Music Industry

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Anonymous
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103443
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Music Industry
Updated:
2011-09-21 20:24:49
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music 309
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Music Industry
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  1. Art and Commerce
    • $40 Billion/year worldwide
    • • Three basic elements:
    • • Musicians
    • • Merchants
    • • Audience
  2. The Helpers
    • • Many musicians avoid confrontation with the real world
    • • The "helpers" out number the composers and performers
    • •Agents
    • • Managers
    • • Promoters
    • • Producers
    • • Engineers
    • • Broadcasters
    • • Merchants
    • • Attorneys
    • • Business advisors
    • • Accountants
  3. More than Rock
    • • The American Symphony League
    • • 34,000 symphony concerts per year
    • • Orchestra revenue totaled $1.77 billion
    • • Opera
    • • 300 professional and semiprofessional companies
    • • Ballet
    • • Increased audience of 15 times since 1950
    • • Record sales of classical is 1.9% of all music purchasesto 1.1% for jazz
  4. Finding a Paying Audience
    First professional musicians in western civilization werethe mimes of Greek and Roman theatre
  5. Finding a Paying Audience: Middle Ages
    • • Minstrels of Germany
    • • Jongleurs of France
    • • Vaudevillians
  6. Finding a Paying Audience: Church
    •To this day musicians are unpaid or paid belowprofessional rates
  7. Finding a Paying Audience: 15th and 16th centuries
    • • Music guilds - Germany
    • • Composers and performers were on the royal payroll
  8. Finding a Paying Audience: P.T. Barnum
    • • 1850
    • • Jenny Lind (opera star)
  9. Finding a Paying Audience: Minstrel show
    • Mid-19th century
  10. Finding a Paying Audience: 1890s
    • • Piano standard in the home
    • • Stephen Foster and a hymnal
    • • 1892 "After the Ball" was the first song to sell amillion (in a 12 month period) - Charles Harris
  11. Radio and records - 1920s
    • • Radio Corporation of America (RCA) formedNational Broadcasting Corporation (NBC) in 1926
    • • RCA bought out Victor at the end of the 1920s
  12. Records
    • *Format Wars
    • -Columbia L.P. 33 . RPM (1948) and RCA 45RPM (1949)

    • *New distribution and merchandising methods
    • - Supermarkets, variety stores, dept. stores, etc.

    • Philips Compact Cassette
    • CD
    • Apple iPod
  13. The industry
    • 75% of worldwide market of recorded music is sold byfive countries:
    • -United States, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany,and France

    • United States does about 1/3 of the worldmarket sales
    • In 1980 U.S. represented 2/3 of world sales
  14. Major Labels
    There are four major labels that account for 74% of theglobal market

    Universal, Sony-BMG, Warner Music, and EMI

    Independent labels account for 26%
  15. Industry Percentage Control
    Infinity and Clear Channels control 80% of radio’s aswell as dominate arenas in the U.S.

    13 retail entities in the U.S. sell 80% of CD’s

    iTunes controls 70% of digital sales

    -Sales

    -The international phase
  16. Business Entities
    • Sole Proprietor
    • Partnership• Corporation
    • Limited Liability Company
    • (LLC)
    • S Corporation
    • Contract Employment or Self-Employment
  17. American Federation of Musicians (AFM)
    • Membership includes:
    • Instrumentalists
    • Conductors
    • Arrangers
    • Orchestrators
    • Copyists
    • Music librarians
    • Proofreaders
  18. Connected with the AFL-CIO.
    • Two levels:
    • -Local (. 400).
    • -National:

    • Recording.
    • Network broadcasting.
    • Theatrical film.
    • Home video.
    • Television film and tape.
    • Live on tape network television.
    • Syndicated programs and services.
    • Pay TV.
    • Commercial announcements.
    • Taped music for traveling productions
  19. Issues in the music induestry team
    • Wages
    • Hours
    • Overtime
    • Working conditions
    • Orchestra size and minimums
    • Instrument doubling
    • Cartage
    • Rehearsal fees
    • Pay for leaders and contractors
    • Tracking scale
    • Reuse and new use
  20. What does AFTRA stand for?
    American Federation of Television and Radio Artists(AFTRA)
  21. Professional singers
    • Live and taped television
    • Radio
    • Transcriptions
    • Phonograph records
    • Non-broadcast material
  22. American Federation of Television and Radio Artists(AFTRA)
    Dues are based on annual gross incomes

    Also includes actors, dancers, announcers, newsreporters, sportscasters, sound effects people, andspecialty artists

    A singer may accept a first job, within a jurisdiction,without joining the union

    Must join within 30 days to continue acceptingAFTRA jobs
  23. Classification of artists
    • Soloists
    • Duos
    • Group singers
  24. Other music Associations
    • American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA)
    • American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA)
    • Actors Equity Union ("Equity")
    • Screen Actors Guild (SAG)
    • International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees(IATSE)
  25. Taxes:
    • Contract Employee:
    • Employer is responsible for deducting taxes fromthe paycheck

    • Income Taxes:
    • Federal
    • State

    • Local
    • Social Security
    • Medicare
    • State Unemployment Taxes
    • State Disability Insurance
    • In several states including California

    Employee receives a W-2 at the end of the year
  26. Self-Employed
    Income Tax• Estimated payments made quarterly• April 15, June 15, September 15, andJanuary 15• Self-employment tax (15.3% net)• Year end accounting a series of tax form 1099 Misc.

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