2nd week Ellen Radiography

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Author:
johndc3476
ID:
133662
Filename:
2nd week Ellen Radiography
Updated:
2012-02-07 23:13:35
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DanJohn
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Description:
Fractures and Trauma situations:
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  1. For the trauma of upper and lower limbs, what should be included in your image? Give an example.
    Both joints should be included for possible secondary fractures away from primary injury.

    • Example:
    • Tibia-fibula area. The proximal and distal joints of the damaged area are required mainly because there might be a secondary fracture from the primary trauma area.

    So if the tibia-fibula bones are affected, x-ray the knee and ankle joints.
  2. For follow-up exams, why should you always include a mimum of one joint nearest the site of injury for all upper and lower limbs?
    Just to be on the safer side to watch out for injuries or fractures from other places other than affected area.
  3. How do you avoid cut off of a body part when doing horizontal beam laterals? Especially in times when no support or pad can be placed between the head and the tabletop?
    Move the patient to the edge of the table or cart, and place the IR below the level of table top.
  4. What is apposition?
    A. The manner in which the fragmented ends of the bone make contact with each other.
    B. End fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are nto making contact with each other.
    C. A fracture where in the fragments overlap and the shafts make contact, but not at fracture ends.
    D. The ends of fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are not making contact with each other.
    The manner in which fragemented ends of the boen make contact with each other.
  5. What is anatomic apposition?
    A. The manner in which the fragmented ends of the bone make contact with each other.
    B. End fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are nto making contact with each other.
    C. A fracture where in the fragments overlap and the shafts make contact, but not at fracture ends.
    D. The ends of fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are not making contact with each other.
    Anatomic alignment of ends of fracture bone fragments, where in the ends of the fragments make end-to-end contact
  6. What is lack of apposition?
    A. The manner in which the fragmented ends of the bone make contact with each other.
    B. End fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are nto making contact with each other.
    C. A fracture where in the fragments overlap and the shafts make contact, but not at fracture ends.
    D. The ends of fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are not making contact with each other.
    The ends of fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are not making contact with each other.
  7. What is bayonet apposition?
    A. The manner in which the fragmented ends of the bone make contact with each other.
    B. End fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are nto making contact with each other.
    C. A fracture where in the fragments overlap and the shafts make contact, but not at fracture ends.
    D. The ends of fragments are alligned but pulled apart and are not making contact with each other.
    A fracture where in teh fragments overlap adn the shafts make contact, but not at the fracture ends.
  8. For a calcenaous, what are the routine projections needed?
    Plantodorsal and mediolateral.
  9. For the view of your calcaneous, how much should you angle your tube and where should your CR be?
    You should angle your tube 40 degrees cephalad at the base of the 3rd MTP
  10. In which way must your foot flex for a Plantodorsal view of the calcaneous?
    Should be where your toes are flexed and pointing towards the direction of your head.
  11. For a mediolateral view of the calceanous, wher should the CR be?
    Should be 1 inch below the medial malleolous.
  12. What does the mediolateral projection of the calcaneous view?
    The Calcaneous and the Talus
  13. What are the routine projections for an ankle?
    AP, Oblique, and Lateral
  14. For an AP ankle, what must you include in your x-ray besides the ankle joint and part of the foot?
    The distal part of the Tibia-Fibula bones.
  15. Where should the central ray be on an AP projection of an Ankle?
    Mid-Malleolous
  16. For an oblique projection of the ankle, which way do you rotate your ankle and how far?
    Medial Rotation and about 45 degrees.
  17. Is the central ray for an AP ankle and an Oblique ankle the same?
    Yes, the central ray is located mid malleolous.
  18. For a lateral ankle, from which side does your light enter? Lateromedially or Mediolaterally?
    The light enters mediolaterally ( From the medial to the lateral side )
  19. For a lateral projection of the ankle, where must the Central Ray be?
    Right on your medial malleolous.
  20. What should you see on an AP ankle projection?
    Yous hould see the medial and upper portion of the joints open
  21. What should you see in an Oblique projection of the Ankle?
    Tibiofibular joints opened.
  22. For a lateral view of the ankle, what should be visualized best?
    Talus and Calcaneous.
  23. For an AP mortise, where should the Central ray be and how should you set the ankle up for this projection?
    The CR should be mid malleolous, and you should rotate the ankle so that the Lateral and Medial Malleolous is equidistant from the IR. ( Parallel to the image receptor )
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