Clinical Prac Midterm

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Author:
kris10leejmu
ID:
136192
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Clinical Prac Midterm
Updated:
2012-02-20 09:19:16
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Clinical Practice
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Clinical Practice
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  1. What kind of drug is Tramadol?
    senthetic opioid
  2. What kind of drug is Glycopyrrolate?
    anticholinergic
  3. What drugs do we combine to make Telazol?
    tilemine and zolazepam
  4. What is Tramadol used for?
    relief of pain
  5. What are the side effects of Tramadol?
    • upset stomach
    • pupil constriction
    • panting
    • suppress coughing
    • decreased heart rate
    • constipation
  6. How is Tramadol metabolized and excreted?
    • metabolized by liver
    • excreted by kidneys
  7. What does glycopyrrolate do?
    controls secretions and reduces intestinal motility.
  8. Should meloxicam - Metacam have repeated doses? Why?
    no because it could cause acute renal failure and death


  9. What position is this?
    thorax DV


  10. What position is this?
    thorax VD

  11. What position is this?
    abdomen VD


  12. What position is this?
    abdomen lateral


  13. What position is this?
    thorax lateral
  14. What position do you put the patient in for a lung radiograph?
    VD
  15. What position do you put the patient in for a heart radiograph?
    DV
  16. What should be the center beam for the thorax?
    heart
  17. What scale of contrast is the abdomen?
    long
  18. What scale of contrast is the thorax?
    short
  19. When should the radiograph be taken during a thorax radiograph?
    peak of inspiration
  20. When should a radiograph be taken during a abdomenal radiograph?
    peak expiration
  21. What should be included in a thorax radiograph?
    manubrium to halfway between last rib and xiphoid
  22. What should be included in an abdominal radiograph?
    three rib spaces cranial to the xiphoid and the greater trochanter of the femur
  23. How do you double the density?
    • increase kVp by 20%
    • double the mAs
  24. How do you reduce the density by half?
    • decrease kVp by 16%
    • half the mAs
  25. What is Sante's Rule?
    (2 x measured thickness) + 40 = kVp
  26. When do you change the kVp?
    if the radiograph is underpenetrated and does not have adequate contrast
  27. When do you change the mAs?
    if there is adequate penetration


  28. What dental instrument is this?
    scaler (makes a triangle)

  29. What dental instrument is this?
    curette (rounded point)


  30. What dental instrument is this?
    • probe
    • 2 - 3mm for dogs
    • 0 - 1mm for cats


  31. What dental instrument is this?
    explorer


  32. What dental instrument is this?
    ultra sonic universal tip


  33. What instrument is this?
    ultra sonic beaver tail tip

  34. What dental instrument is this?
    ultra sonic perio tip (fine tip)
  35. Which drug(s) used in lab caused an anesthetic effect?
    Telazol
  36. Which drug(s) used in lab caused sedataion/tranquilization?
    Dexdomitor
  37. Which drug(s) used in lab caused analgesia?
    Meloxicam, Tramadol, butorphanol, dextomitor (some analgesia)
  38. Which drug(s) used in lab were used to prevent bradycardia?
    glycopyrrolate (anitcholinergics)
  39. What 2 drugs are in Telazol?
    • tiletamine
    • zolazepam
  40. What type of drug is tiletamine?
    a cyclohexamine
  41. What type of drug is meloxicam?
    an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug)
  42. What type of drug is zolazepam?
    a benzodiazepine
  43. Is Tramadol an opioid?
    no
  44. What type of drug is Tramadol?
    an opioid (synthetic opioid)
  45. What are the main side effects of tramadol?
    decreased heart rates and respiratory rates
  46. Where is Tramadol secreted from?
    the kidneys (30%) and liver (70%)
  47. What drug(s) used in lab were opioid(s)?
    butorphanol
  48. What type of drug is dexdomitor?
    a thiazine derivative - alpha 2 agonist
  49. What is the reverser of dexdomitor (which was used in some labs)?
    atipamezole (Antisedan)
  50. How should Dexdomitor be handled? Why?
    with gloves. it can be directly absorbed through skin, causing the same effects in humans
  51. If glyco is going to be given with dexdomitor, when should it be given? Why?
    at least 10 minutes before. if not it may lead to adverse cardiovascular effects such as tachycardia, hypertension, and cardiac arrhythmias
  52. After administration, when does glycopyrrolate hit peak effects?
    at about 15 minutes
  53. After administration, when does butorphanol begin to take effect and for how long do the effects last?
    takes effect after about 20 minutes and lasts for 3 - 6 hours
  54. What should be done after administration of dexdomitor?
    keep quiet and let the animal rest for 10 - 15 minutes
  55. After administration, when does dexdomitor hit peak effect?
    at about 30 minutes
  56. After administration, when does meloxicam hit peak effect and for how long do the effects last?
    hits peak effect at about 15 minutes and stays in circulation for over 24 hours because the drug has a 15 hour terminal half-life
  57. After administration, when does Telazol begin to have an anesthetic effect?
    within 5 - 10 minutes

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