Intro to Ethics

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Author:
roanrodgers
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139309
Filename:
Intro to Ethics
Updated:
2012-03-03 13:56:48
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Categorical Imperative
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Chapter 10
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  1. Chapter 10: The Categorical Imperative
    • Kant argues that the moral worth of an action consists solely in the
    • principle that motivates it and not in any consequences that might
    • follow from it. A morally valid principle is one that can serve as a
    • universal law, applicable to all at any time or in any place, without
    • resulting in a contradiction. Such a principle is "categorical" (as
    • opposed to "hypothetical"); it enjoins an action that is good of itself
    • and not merely as a means to another end. Because humanity, in oneself
    • or in others, is of absolute worth, Kant is able to give the categorical
    • imperative a second formulation: So act that you use humanity,
    • whether in your own person or in the person of any other, always at the
    • same time as an end, never merely as a means.
  2. Moral worth
    • An action's quality of being morally praiseworthy
    • or blameworthy; determined solely by the principle that motivates the
    • action and not by any of the consequences that potentially or actually
    • follow from it.
  3. Hypothetical imperative
    Command of reason that recommends some action as necessary to achieve some desired objective.
  4. First formulation of the categorical imperative
    Act only in accordance with that maxim through which you can at the same time will that it become a universal law.
  5. Second formulation of the categorical imperative
    • Act in such a way that you use humanity, whether in
    • your own person or in the person of any other, always at the same time
    • as an end, never merely as a means.
  6. End in itself
    • Something that has absolute worth, that possesses
    • value in its own right rather than mere usefulness as a means of
    • achieving some goal external to itself.

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