Speech Science Test 2 part 2

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oceaneyes8
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140273
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Speech Science Test 2 part 2
Updated:
2012-03-07 14:03:04
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Speech Science
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Last 40 Questions of Speech Science Test 2
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  1. How do the FO,intensity, and duration of stressed syllables differ from unstressed syllables?
    A stressed syllable has a higher FO, higher intensity, and longer duration than an unstressed syllable, and it typically is the vowel that carries the increased stress.
  2. Which structures make up the vocal tract?
    Lips, tongue, velum, larynx (labial,lingual,velopharyngeal, laryngeal)
  3. Which type of occlusion occurs when the mandible is protruded? (Prognathic jaw)
    Mesiocclusion (class III)
  4. Which type of occlusion occurs when the mandible is retracted? (overject)
    Distocclusion (Class II)
  5. Which type of occlusion is the normal occlusion relationship in which the upper arch overlaps the lower one in front?
    Neutrocclusion (Class I)
  6. When there are problems in upper and lower dental arch position and tooth relationships, what is this called?
    Malocclusions
  7. A band of connective tissue joining the inferior tongue and the mandible is called what?
    Lingual frenulum (or frenum)
  8. What are the various part/sections of the tongue?
    The Apex (tip), The blade (posterior to the apex), front (part below the hard palate), back (part below the soft palate, dorsum (broad superior surface), body (major mass), Root (attaches to hyoid extends along pharynx). The median fibrous septum divides tongue in left/right portions.
  9. The velum at rest ____ _____ into the pharynx.
    During production of consanants the velum is _______.
    During production of nasals the velum is ______.
    • hangs down
    • raised
    • lowered
  10. Interacting in a complex fashion to produce the rapid, delicate articluations of speech and non speech activity is the role of which muscles of the tongue?
    Intrinsic muscles
  11. Moving the tongue as a unit and getting the tongue into position for articulation is the role of which muscles of the tongue?
    Extrinsic muscles
  12. Describe how the four valves (lingual,labial,velar,laryngeal) act as valves of the oral cavity?
    • Labial (the lips open and close)
    • Lingual (tongue comes in contact with other structures)
    • Velopharyngeal valve (velopharyngeal port opens/closes)
    • Laryngeal valve (vocal folds open and close)
  13. Pairs of consonants that differ only in voicing are called what?
    Cognates
  14. Are all vowels voiced?
    Yes
  15. Which language has more vowels, English or Spanish?
    English
  16. The vocal tract of chimps is ___ than the vocal tract of humans.
    A. shorter
    B. longer
    C. pinker
    D. hairier
    A. shorter
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  17. Compared to our ancestral species, the length of the vocal tract in modern humans has _______.
    A. become shorter
    B. become longer
    C. not changed
    D. all of the above
    B. become longer
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  18. The length of the vocal tract in men is _____ than the length of the vocal tract in women.
    A. pinker
    B. longer
    C. hairier
    D. shorter
    B. longer
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  19. Compared to adults, a child's vocal tract is _____.
    A. shorter
    B. pinker
    C. hairier
    D. longer
    A. Shorter
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  20. Vowel durations in dysarthric speakers are ______ than normal speakers.
    Longer
  21. These pathways transmit information from sensory receptors towards the CNS.
    Afferent (Sensory)
  22. These pathways transmit information from the CNS towards muscles and glands.
    Efferent (Motor)
  23. The ___ the nerve, the more heavily it is myelinated. (larger or smaller).
    Larger
  24. The conduction rate in myelinated nerves is _____ than non-myelinated nerves. (faster or slower)
    faster
  25. This structure consists of four cavities of the brain which produce cerebrospinal fluid.
    Ventricles
  26. Cerebrospinal fluid reduces the weight of the brain. True or False.
    True
  27. Does grey matter form the outer covering of the brain?
    Yes. The outermost layer of the brain (cortex) is grey matter.
  28. Does grey matter form the outer covering of the spinal cord?
    No. The spinal cord has white matter on the outside and grey matter on the inside.
  29. Which brain lobe contains Broca's area?
    Frontal Lobe: 1/3 of cortex; language and speech; most motor functions.
  30. Which brain lobe contains Wernicke's area?
    Temporal Lobe: important for understanding; receives info from ear and auditory nerve.
  31. The cranial nerves originate from the ____.
    • Brainstem; the site of many reflexes involved in respiration, body temp, heartrate, swallowing, digestion.
    • Made up of the Midbrain, Pons, and Medulla.
  32. The spinal nerves originate from the ______.
    Spinal Cord
  33. The cerebral cortex exerts ________ control of movement. (contralateral or ipsilateral)
    Contralateral
  34. The cerebellum exerts ________ control of movement.
    (contralateral or ipsilateral)
    ipsilateral
  35. This structure governs balance, posture, background muscle tone, and the coordination of voluntary movements.
    Cerebellum
  36. This structure controls many high level reflexes such as respiration and swallowing.
    Brainstem
  37. This section of the brainstem mediates many reflexes such as coughing, sneezing, and vomiting.
    Medulla
  38. How has brain imaging helped our understanding of stuttering?
    • May be some kind of neurological dysfunction.
    • Cerebral dominance
    • Complex network of neural structures malfunction
    • Dopamine levels
  39. How has brain imaging helpe our understanding of Parkinson's Disease?
    The loss of dopamine in the substantia nigra of the basal nuclei can be detected with brain imaging.
  40. How has brain imaging helped our understanding of multiple sclerosis?
    Continued MRI imaging can detect degrees of demyelinization of upper and lower motor neurons.
  41. How has brain imaging helped our understanding of Alzheimer's disease?
    fMRI is an important tool in diagnosing Alzheimer's before the onset of severe symptoms. fMRI can also be used to measure the effects of medication on memory.

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