English Composition

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Anonymous
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141061
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English Composition
Updated:
2012-03-11 20:28:20
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English
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English
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  1. Contextualizing
    • Strategy that attempts to see the relationships between a constituent part, other parts and the whole.
    • The text is placed into context before it is read.
  2. Strategy that attempts to see the relationships between a constituent part, other parts, and the whole.
    Contextualizing
  3. The text is placed into context before it is read.
    Contextualizing
  4. Cramming
    Strategy that involves taking in as much information as possible in a limited amount of time.
  5. Strategy that involves taking in as much as possible in a limited amount of time.
    Cramming
  6. Judging
    Considering the title of a work as a clue to its content or message.
  7. Considering the title of a work as a clue to its content or message.
    Judging
  8. X-raying
    Scanning strategy that focuses on the structure of a text.
  9. Scanning strategy that focuses on the structure of a text.
    X-raying
  10. X-ray results of many books:
    Table of contents
  11. X-raying a book can tell you if you want to _.
    take the time to read it.
  12. What can tell you if you want to take the time to read a book?
    X-raying
  13. X-raying can help prepare you for _.
    what you are going to read.
  14. X-raying can help you begin _.
    framing questions about the writing.
  15. What can help you prepare for what you're going to read?
    X-raying
  16. What can help you begin framing questions about the writing?
    X-raying
  17. Annotating
    Process of writing notes as you read.
  18. Process of writing notes as you read.
    Annotating
  19. Coming to terms
    Process of concluding which words the author is using as terms and what precisely those terms mean.
  20. Process of concluding which words the authro is using as terms and what precisely those terms mean.
    Coming to terms
  21. Paraphrasing
    Translating within a single language, or putting a text into your own words.
  22. Translating within a single language, or putting a text into your own words.
    Paraphrasing
  23. Annotating points to the _.
    complex, symbiotic relationship between reading and writing.
  24. A simple concept that points to the complex, symbiotic relationship between reading and writing:
    Annotating
  25. Thought process
    When reading a passage, a series of thoughts, impressions, connections, and questions pass through your mind.
  26. When reading a passage, a whole series of thoughts, impressions, connections, and questions pass through your mind; this is referred to as _.
    thought process
  27. Annotation is an aid to memory, a record of your thought process, a _.
    transcript of your part in an ongoing conversation with the author.
  28. Annotation is an aid to memery, a _, a transcript of your part in an ongoing conversation with the author.
    record of your thought process
  29. Annotation is _, a record of your thought process, a transcript of your part in an ongoing conversation with the author.
    an aid to memory
  30. An aid to memory is _.
    annotation.
  31. A record of your thought process is _.
    annotation
  32. A transcript of your part in an ongoing conversation with the author is _.
    annotation.
  33. Four guidelines for effective annotation are:
    1. Ask questions of the author.
    2. Make reminders for yourself.
    3. Make note of recurring images, arguments, ideas, words, and phrases.
    4. _.
    Starting with the title, keep track of what kinds of expectations the author seems to be creating.
  34. Four guidelines for effective annotation are:
    1. Ask questions of the author.
    2. Make reminders for yourself.
    3. _.
    4. Starting with the title, keep track of what kinds of expectations the author seems to be creating.
    Make note of recurring images, arguments, words, and phrases.
  35. Four guidelines for effective annotation are:
    1. Ask questions of the author.
    2. _.
    3. Make note of recurring images, arguments, ideas, words, and phrases.
    4. Starting with the title, keep track of what kinds of expectations the author seems to be creating.
    Make reminders for yourself.
  36. Four guidelines for effective annotation are:
    1. _.
    2. Make reminders for yourself.
    3. Make note of recurring images, arguments, ideas, words, and phrases.
    4. Starting with the title, keep track of what kinds of expectations the author seems to be creating.
    Ask questions of the author.
  37. Ask questions of the author:
    • What does the author mean by a particular term or phrase?
    • Why has the author structured the writing the way he or she has?
    • What exactly does the author mean when he or she writes x or y?
  38. Make reminders for yourself.
    • What passages do you want to go back and read?
    • What words or phrases do you want to look up?
    • What passages would it help to briefly paraphrase in the margins?
    • Where does the author seem to be making allusions that you want to do further reading on?
  39. Make note of recurring images, arguments, ideas, words, and phrases.
    Such simple cataloguing can help you recognize themes and patterns in the writing that might otherwise go unnoticed.
  40. Starting with the title, keep track of what kinds of expectations the author seems to be creating.
    Keep track of how well your expectations are filled.
  41. Outlining can help writers shape their writing, but it can also give readers a _.
    window into that process.
  42. Outlining can help writers _, but it can also give readers a window into that process.
    shape their writing
  43. What can help writers shape their writing?
    Outlining
  44. Outlines can help readers _ in an author's writing.
    diagnose potential problems
  45. What can help readers diagnose potential problems in an author's writing?
    Outlining
  46. Outlining can be a tool in _.
    creatively assessing a piece of writing.
  47. What can bea tool in creatively assessing a piece of writing?
    Outlining
  48. Words can have _. Terms are words with only one meaning.
    more than one meaning.
  49. Words can have more than one meaning. Terms are _.
    words with only one meaning.
  50. Process of concluding which words an author is using as terms and what precisely those terms mean is known as _.
    coming to terms.
  51. If you were able to translate English into English, you would be _.
    paraphrasing
  52. Paraphrasing is most commonly known by rhe phrases "_" and "_".
    • in other words
    • in your own words
  53. Purpose of putting an author's idea into your own words:
    Help _, rather than _, the author's ideas.
    • internalize
    • memorize
  54. Purpose of putting an author's idea into your own words:
    Force you to _ about the words the author is using and how _.
    • think consciously
    • s/he has put them together
  55. Purpose of putting an author's idea into your own words:
    Make you _ and _ more clearly what the author has attempted to say.
    • understand
    • visualize
  56. Purpose of putting an author's idea into your own words:
    Help you to see the author's writing in _; it can bring to mind _ and _ that extend or anticipate those of the author.
    • a different light
    • ideas
    • connections
  57. What can help you to internalize, rather than simply memorize, the author's ideas?
    Paraphrasing
  58. What forces you to think consciously about the words the author is using and how s/he has put them together?
    Paraphrasing
  59. What can make you understand and visualize more clearly what the author has attempted to say?
    Paraphrasing
  60. What can hlep you to see the author's writing in a different light; and bring to mind ideas and connections that extend or anticipate those of the author.
    Paraphrasing
  61. True paraphrase does not simply rearrange the author's words, but _.
    replaces them to such an extent that the two versions have no significant words or phrases in common.
  62. Summarizing can give you a sense of _.
    what the parts of an essay add up to.
  63. What gives you a sense of what the parts of an essay add up to?
    Summarizing
  64. Summarize it to put into _.
    fewer words.
  65. Summarizing can be useful for condensing complex ideas, arguments, or plots into _.
    more manageable forms.
  66. Summarizing can be useful for condensing complex _, _, or _ into more manageable forms.
    • ideas
    • arguments
    • plots
  67. What can be useful for condensing complex ideas, arguments, or plts into more manageable forms?
    Summarizing
  68. Effectively summarizing an author's writing forces you to _.
    carefully consider which terms and ideas are most important.
  69. What forces you to carefully consider which terms and ideas are most important in an author's writing?
    Summarizing
  70. Contradiction
    Either of two propositions related in such a way that it is impossible for both to be true or both to be false.
  71. Either of two propositions related in such a way that it is impossible for both to be true or both to be false.
    Contradiction
  72. Contradiction in terms
    Occurs when an author defines a term in one way and uses it in another (usually opposite) way.
  73. Occurs when an author defines a term in one way and uses it in another (usually opposite) way.
    Contradiction in terms
  74. Figurative language
    Devices of language that are noliteral; figurative language says one thing but means another.
  75. Devices of language that are nonliteral.
    Figurative language
  76. What says one thing but means another?
    Figurative language
  77. Irony
    Intentional use of contradiction to emphasize or make light of something by saying or doing the opposite of what one intends.
  78. Intentional use of contradiction to emphasize or make light of something by saying or doing the opposite of what one intends:
    Irony
  79. Paradox
    Statement that is seemingly contradictory but which could nevertheless be true.
  80. Statement that is seemingly contradictory but which could nevertheless be true:
    Paradox
  81. Simple contradiction
    Unintentional contradiction
  82. Unintentional contradiction
    Simple contradiction
  83. Revising means literally _.
    "to see again".
  84. Researching is _.
    "to search again where ther is still room for exploration and discovery."
  85. To search again where there is still room for exploration is _.
    researching
  86. To see again is _.
    rereading.
  87. Reading for ambiguity is a process of
    1. identifying ambiguous wording
    2. evaluating the ambiguity
    3. _.
    teasing out the finite or infinite readings of an ambiguous passage.
  88. Reading for ambiguity is a process of
    1. identifying ambiguous wording
    2. _
    3. teasing out the finite or infinite readings of an ambiguous passage.
    evaluating the ambiguity
  89. Reading for ambiguity is a process of
    1. _
    2. evaluating for ambiguity
    3. teasing out the finite and infinite readings of an ambiguous passage
    identifying ambiguous wording
  90. Reading for ambiguity is about looking for where the author has _.
    opened the door to possibility.
  91. Character
    Person in a literary work; sometimes referred to as "flat" or "round".
  92. Person in a literary work; sometimes referred to as "flat" or "round."
    Character
  93. Genre
    Type or mode of writing.
  94. Types or mode of writing:
    Genres
  95. Mimesis
    Refers to the author's means of representing or mirroring reality in fiction.
  96. Refers to the author's means of representing or mirroring reality in fiction:
    Mimesis
  97. Narrator
    In a story, the person speaking to the reader or telling the reader the story.
  98. In a story, the person speaking to the reader or telling the reader the story:
    Narrator
  99. Plot
    The way an author represents a chain of events within a literary work.
  100. The way an author represents a chain of events within a literary work:
    Plot
  101. Point of view
    Perspective or vantage point by which the reader is able to see or experience certain events within a story or poem.
  102. Perspective or vantage point by which the reader is able to see or experience certain evetns within a story or poem.
    Point of view
  103. Setting
    Place where a story occurs.
  104. Place where the story occurs:
    Setting
  105. Symbol
    An object, action or even a person that has acquired meaning beyond itself, anything that represents more than itself or is invested with meaning.
  106. An object, action, or even a person that has acquired meaning beyond itself; anything that represents more than itself or is invested with meaning:
    Symbol
  107. Theme
    Unifying, central subject or idea that provides a literary work with its stance or approach.
  108. Unifying central subject or idea that provides a literary work with its stance or approach:
    Theme
  109. Tone
    Emotional approach or attitude that the writer chooses to use to color his or her work.
  110. Emotional approach or attitude that the writer chooses to use to color his or her work:
    Tone
  111. A short story is a fictional narrative in _.
    prose.
  112. A short story is a _ in prose.
    fictional narrative
  113. What is a fictional narrative in prose?
    A short story
  114. Prose
    Refers to language that is not obviously musical in beat or rhyme and that is printed from the left to the right margin.
  115. Refers to language that is not obviously musical in beat or rhyme and that is printed from the left to the right margin:
    Prose

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