Chapter 1

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Author:
leighton369
ID:
16647
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Chapter 1
Updated:
2010-05-27 15:43:38
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Providing Food Safety
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Overview
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  1. Define a foodborne illness:
    A foodborne illness is an incident in which two or more people get the same illness after eating the same food.
  2. List the costs of foodborne illness:
    • 1. Loss of sales & customers
    • 2. Loss of reputation
    • 3. Negative media exposure
    • 4. Lawsuits & legal fees
    • 5. Lowered employee morale
    • 6. Employee absenteeism
    • 7. Increased insurance premiums
    • 8. Staff retraining
  3. What population are high risk?
    • 1. Infants & pre-schoolers
    • 2. Pregnant women
    • 3. Elderly
    • 4. People with compromised immune systems
  4. What are the 3 potential hazards to food safety (& give example):
    • 1. Biological: microorganisms, toxins
    • 2. Chemical: cleaners, lubricants
    • 3. Physical: foreign objects (bandage), naturally occuring hazards (bones)
  5. List the five most common risk factors that cause foodborne illness:
    • 1. Purchasing food from unsafe sources
    • 2. Failing to cook food properly
    • 3. Holding food at incorrect temperatures
    • 4. Using contaminated equipment
    • 5. Poor personal hygiene
  6. Time-temperature abuse can happen three ways:
    • 1. If food is not held/stored at proper temperatures
    • 2. If food is not cooked or reheated to temperatures that kill microorganisms
    • 3. If food is not cooled properly
  7. Five ways cross-contamination can occur
    • 1. Contaminated ingredients are added to food that receives no further cooking
    • 2. Contaminated food touches or drips into ready-to eat food
    • 3. A food handler touches contaminated food and then touches ready-to-eat food.
    • 4. Ready-to-eat food touches contaminated surfaces
    • 5. Contaminated cleaning towels touch food-contact surfaces
  8. What are the key practices for ensuring food safety?
    • 1. Controlling time & temperature
    • 2. Preventing cross-contamination
    • 3. Practicing good personal hygiene
    • 4. Purchasing food from approved, reputable suppliers
    • 5. Cleaning & sanitizing properly
  9. Why are the elderly at a higher risk for foodborne ilnesses?

    A. Their immune systems have weakened with age
    B. They are more likely to spend time in a hospital
    C. They are more likely to suffer allergic reactions
    D. Their appetites have decreased with age
    A
  10. The three categories of food safety hazards are biological, physical and...

    A. Temporal
    B. practical
    C. chemical
    D. thermal
    C
  11. For a foodborne illness to be considered an "outbreak" a minimum of how many people must experience the same illness after eating the same food?
    A. 1
    B. 2
    C. 10
    D. 20
    B
  12. According to the CDC, the five most common risk factors that cause foodborne illnesses are failing to cook food adequately, holding food at incorrect temperatures, using contaminated equipment, practicing poor personal hygiene, and...

    A. reheating leftover food
    B. serving ready-to-eat food
    C. using single-use disposable gloves
    D. purchasing food from unsafe sources
    D
  13. T or F:
    A foodhandler's hands can transfer pathogens from one food to another
    T
  14. T or F:
    Foodhandler's who don't wash their handsthe right way can cause a foodborne illness.
    T
  15. T or F:
    A foodborne-illness outbreak is when two or more people get sick after eating at the same restaurant or foodservice operation.
    • F
    • (They have to have eaten the same food)
  16. T or F:
    Adults are more likely than preschool-age children to become ill from contaminated food.
    F
  17. How did this become unsafe?
    Leftover Soup is cooled on the counter

    A. Cross-contamination
    B. Poor personal Hygiene
    C. Time-temperature abuse
    C
  18. How did this become unsafe?
    A foodhandler wearing gloves places a hamburger on the grill and then places lettuce and tomato on a bun.

    A. Cross-contamination
    B. Poor personal hygiene
    C. Time-temperature abuse
    A
  19. How did this become unsafe?
    A foodhandler prepping a salad stops to scratch an itch on her arm and then returns to making the salad.

    A. Cross-contamination
    B. Poor personal hygiene
    C. Time-temperature abuse
    B
  20. How did this become unsafe?
    A server setting tables touches the food-contact surfaces of the utensils when placing them on the table.

    A. Cross-contamination
    B. Poor personal hygiene
    C. Time-temperature abuse
    A
  21. What are the potential costs associated with foodborne-illness outbreaks?
    • 1. Loss of customers & sales
    • 2. Loss of reputation
    • 3. Negative media exposure
    • 4. Lawsuits and legal fees
    • 5. Increased insurance premiums
    • 6. Need to retrain employees
  22. T or F:

    A foodborne-illness outbreak has occurred when two or more people get the same illness after eating the same food
    T
  23. T or F:

    People on chemotherpy have a higher risk of conracting a foodborne illness
    T
  24. T or F:

    Adults are more likely than preschool-age children to become ill from contaminated food.
    F
  25. T or F:

    A foodborne-illness outbreak can raise an establishment's insurance premium
    T
  26. T or F:

    A foodborne illness can occur if food is not cooled properly
    T
  27. Why are the elderly at higher risk for getting foodborne illnesses?
    As people age, their immune system weakens.
  28. What are the 3 major types of hazards to food safety
    • 1. Biological
    • 2. Chemical
    • 3. Physical

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