L1 Instructor Self Test Part 6 Badges.txt

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L1 Instructor Self Test Part 6 Badges.txt
2012-09-06 08:31:22
Gliding Instructor Badges

L1 Instructor Badges
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  1. What are the barograph requirements for a pilot attempting a Gold C Distance/Diamond Goal?
    A barograph or data recorder must be carried, in order to substantiate that a landing was not made at an intermediate point during the flight
  2. Explain the "1% rule" as applied to distance tasks.
    For distances up to 100 km, the loss of height between the start altitude (at the departure point) and the altitude of the finishing point must not exceed 1% of the distance covered. For distances over 100 km the distance is reduced by 100 times the excess over 1000 metres loss of height
  3. What is meant by "great circle distance".
    The arc of a great circle on the earth's surface joining given points defined by their geographical coordinates
  4. What is the height gain required for the Gold height badge?
    3,000 metres (9,843 feet)
  5. Define the various ways in which a Silver badge distance task may be flown.
    A flight over a straight course of 50 km (subject to 1% rule). Any leg of more than 50 km of a longer predeclared course may qualify, subject to the 1% rule applied over the whole course
  6. Is it possible to claim all three Silver badge requirements on one flight?
  7. If you were asked, as an Official Observer, to sign a pilot's application form for a Diamond height claim and you knew that the pilot had completed the flight without carrying oxygen, what would you do?
    There is no FAI ruling on this, but the pilot has broken the law and it is a debatable point whether an Official Observer should sign the application for a badge.
  8. Is it necessary to hold a Competitor's Licence to fly in the State Comps?
  9. If claiming a distance record, by how much should the old record be exceeded?
    1 km
  10. What are the "in sector" requirements for turning-point photographs for a closed-circuit task?
    The so-called "observation zone" for turn-points is the airspace above a 90-degree sector on the ground with its apex at the turn-point and orientated symmetrically to and remote from the two legs meeting at the turn point