Card Set Information

2012-09-12 22:50:18

Show Answers:

  1. What organism is the cause of canine anaplasmosis?
    Anaplasma phagocytophilum
  2. What organism is the cause of Feline Infectious Anemia?
    Mycoplasma haemofelis
  3. Are cats able to completely clear a Mycoplasma haemofelis infection?
    • No, (organisms remain in macrophages)
    • Remain carriers
  4. What is the best drug to treat a Mycoplasma haemofelis infection?
  5. What percent of seropositive dogs for Borrelia burgdorferi are asymptomatic?
  6. How long must a tick be attached to a dog for transmission of Borrelia infection?
    48 hours
  7. Does ELISA or IFA differentiate b/t dogs with lyme disease and dogs with earlier exposure or vaccine?
  8. What disease is difficult to distinguish from Lyme disease?
    Immune-mediated polyarthritis
  9. What antibody test distinguishes b/t natural exposure and vaccine induced antibodies for Lyme disease?
    C6 antibody test (SNAP 3Dx)
  10. What two leptospira organisms usually attribute to canine leptospirosis?
    • L. pomona
    • L. grippotyphosa
  11. What types of dogs are most commonly affected by Leptospirosis?
    • Male, large breed outdoor dogs
    • (German Shepherd or mix)
  12. What can increase infection rates of Leptospirosis?
    Wet periods of rainfall or flooding
  13. What organs are the main targets of Leptospira organisms?
    • Kidneys
    • Liver
  14. What disease is the most common cause of Acute Renal Failure/Nephritis?
  15. If a dog has acute renal failure what should always be considered?
    Serology for Leptospirosis
  16. What monoclonal antibody titer is suggestive of Leptospirosis? Highly Indicative?
    • Suggestive - 1:400 or greater
    • Highly Indicative - 1:800 or greater
  17. What treatment will reduce or eliminate leptospires being transmitted through urine of infected dog?
    Penicillin treatment
  18. What clinical signs are associated with Brucellosis?
    • Generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly
    • Reproductive failure
    • Diskospondylitis
    • Uveitis
  19. What enables Feline Coronavirus to cause FIP?
    Mutation during intestinal replication enables it to infect macrophages and cause FIP
  20. What is the deadliest infectious disease of cats?
  21. What is the defining event in FIP?
    replication of FCoV in macrophages
  22. What are some factors that increase FCoV replication in intestines (increasing chance of FIP)?
    • Viral load
    • Stress
    • Immune impairment
    • Corticosteroids
    • Sx
  23. Is FIP directly contagious?
    No, cats with FIP shed avirulent nonmutated FCoV
  24. What is a classic lesion of FIP?
    • Pyogranulomatous hepatitis
    • Pyogranulomatous encephalomyelitis
  25. What are the two most common FIP lab findings?
    • Increased TP
    • Increased Globulin (A/G ratio <0.8(0.45)
  26. What is the best confirmatory test for FIP? What other tests should it be combined with?
    • HISTOPATH is gold standard
    • Combined w/ Immunohistochemistry and Immunofluorescence
  27. What treatment is best for FIP?
    No proven effective treatment
  28. Is the FIP vaccine recommended?
  29. How is FeLV transmitted?
    Prolonged close contact with infected cats
  30. What is the most important factor of FeLV to non-infected cats?
    Age-related resistance in cats over 4 months of age
  31. True or False? The majority of FeLV-infected cats are asymptomatic at time of diagnosis
  32. What is the preferred screening test (high sensitivity) for FeLV?
    SNAP and Elisa tests (detects antigen)
  33. What is the preferred confirmatory test (high specificity) for FeLV?
    IFA Test (detects antigen)
  34. What treatment is effective for treatment of FeLV?
    No treatment
  35. What is the main route of transmission of FIV?
    Bite wounds
  36. What is the most common secondary infection of FIV (and most common clinical sign)?
    Stomatitis (oral disease)
  37. What is the preferred screening test for FIV?
    SNAP test or Immunoassay (ELISA) (detects antibodies)
  38. What is the preferred confirmatory test for FIV?
    Western Blot or IFA (detects antibodies)