english

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Author:
Keletho
ID:
172315
Filename:
english
Updated:
2012-09-20 22:30:59
Tags:
fallacies
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Description:
fallcys
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The flashcards below were created by user Keletho on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. 1.    Making
    assumptions about a whole group or range of cases

    Based
    on a sample that is inadequate or with little evidence (usually because it is
    atypical or too small).
    Hasty Generalization 
  2. Offering a solution or an explanation that is too
    simple for the problem or issue being argued. This fault overlooks the
    complexity of an issue.
    . Oversimplification 
  3. A form of generalization or oversimplification in
    which an entire group is narrowly labeled or perceived on the basis of a few in
    the group.
    . Stereotyping 
  4. – falsely claiming that, because something resembles
    something else in one way, it resembles is in all ways.
    False analogy 
  5. Drawing inferences or conclusions that do not follow
    logically from available evidence.
    Non sequitur 
  6. Attacking
    the character of the arguer rather than the argument itself. 
    . Ad hominem 
  7. - A complicated fallacy, an argument that begs the
    question asks the reader to simply accept the conclusion without providing real
    evidence.



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    Attacking
    the character of the arguer rather than the argument itself. 
    . Begging the Question
  8. Partway
    through an argument, the arguer goes off on a tangent,  raising a side issue that distracts the
    audience from what's really at stake. Often, the arguer never returns to the
    original issue.
    Red Herring - 
  9. ) - Assuming
    that because B comes after A, A caused B.
    Post Hoc (false cause) 
  10. - The premises of an argument do support a particular
    conclusion – but                  not
    the conclusion that the arguer actually draws.
    Missing the Point 
  11. the arguer claims that a sort of chain reaction,
    usually ending in some      dire
    consequence, will take place, but there's really not enough evidence for that
    assumption
    Slippery Slope 
  12. Many arguments rely on an analogy between two or more
    objects ideas, or situations. If the two things that are being compared aren't really
    alike in the relevant respects, the analogy is a weak one
    Weak Analogy - 
  13. Often, we add strength to our arguments by referring
    to respected sources or authorities & explaining their positions on issues
    we're discussing
    Appeal to Authority 
  14. It takes place when an arguer tries to get people to accept
    a conclusion by making them feel sorry for someone.
    Appeal to Pity – 
  15. In this one, the arguer basically says, "Look,
    there's no conclusive evidence on the issue at hand. Therefore, you should
    accept my conclusion on this issue."
    Appeal to Ignorance 
  16. One way of making our own arguments stronger is to
    anticipate and respond in advance to the arguments that an opponent might
    make.  The arguer sets up a wimpy version
    of the opponent’s position and tries to score point by knocking it down. 
    Straw Man - 
  17. – In this one, the arguer sets up situation so it
    looks like there are only two choices. The arguer then eliminates one of the
    choices, so it seems that we are left with only one option: the one the arguer
    wanted us to pick in the first place.
    False Dichotomy 
  18. Sliding
    between two or more different meanings of a single word or phrase that is
    important to the argument.
    Equivocation 

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