Sociology - Religion

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Sociology - Religion
2010-05-02 21:30:13

Sociology part 2
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  1. Functional Illiterate
    A high school graduate who has difficulty with basic reading and math.
  2. Hidden Curriculum
    The unwritten goals of schools, such as teaching obedience to authority and conformity to cultural norms.
  3. Manifest Functions
    The intended beneficial consequences of people's actions.
  4. Protestant Ethic
    Weber's term to describe the ideal of a self-denying, highly moral life accompanied by hard work and frugality.
  5. Rituals
    Ceremonies or repetitive practices; in this context, religious observances or rites, often intended to evoke a sense of awe of the sacred.
  6. Secularization of Religion
    The replacement of a religion's spiritual or "other worldly" concerns with concerns about "this world".
  7. Cosmology
    Teachings or ideas that provide a unified picture of the world.
  8. Cultural Transmission of Values
    In refernce to education, the ways in which schools transmit a society's culture, especially its core values.
  9. Gatekeeping
    The process by which education opens and closes doors of opportunity; another term for the social placement function of education.
  10. Latent Functions
    Unintended beneficial consequences of people's actions.
  11. Social Placement
    A function of education - funneling people into a society's various positions.
  12. Tracking
    The sorting of students into different educational programs on the basis of real or perceived abilities.
  13. Credential Society
    The use of diplomas and degrees to determine who is eligible for jobs, even though the diploma or degree may be irrelevant to the actual work.
  14. Mainstreaming
    Helping people to become part of the mainstream of society.
  15. Profane
    Durkheim's term for common elemnts of everyday life.
  16. Sect
    A religious group larger than a cult that still feels substantial hostility from and toward society.
  17. Social Promotion
    Passing students on to the next level even though they have not mastered the basic materials.