Lifespan Q1

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prestoncas
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174893
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Lifespan Q1
Updated:
2012-10-01 23:13:26
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HSC211
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Baker Flint HSC211 Lifespan Development Q1 F2012
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  1. What is lifespan development?
    - The pattern of change that begins at conception and continues until death
  2. Why study lifespan development?
    We need to know what is considered normal so that we can understand what is abnormal
  3. What are the 6 divisions of lifespan
    • - prenatal
    • - infancy
    • - childhood
    • - adolescence
    • - adulthood
    • - senescence
  4. Nagi Model
    • - PTs use most often
    • - Introduced as an alternative model to the medical model of disease
    • - Describes health as a product of the relationship between health and function
  5. What are the 4 subcategories of the Nagi Model?
    • - Pathology
    • - Imapirment
    • - Functional Limitation
    • - Disability
  6. Pathology
    (Nagi model)
    • - physician's medical diagnosis
    • - cellular level
    • - interruption of normal processes
    • - signs and symptoms
  7. Impairment
    (Nagi Model)
    • - Result of pathology
    • - Organ, tissue and system level
    • - Abnormality of structure or functio
  8. Functional Limitation
    (Nagi Model)
    • - Level of the whole person
    • - Inability to perform usual activities
  9. Disability
    (Nagi Model)
    • - Limitation in performance of socially defined roles and tasks
    • - Extent determined by the patient's social culture and physical environment
    • - Over time, functional limitations have not been overcome enough to maintain normal performance
  10. OT goal is to ....
    reduce activity limitations at both the medical and societal levels
  11. What is occupation?
    the activities that occupy people's tima and give their life a meaning
  12. PT Frame of Reference
    disablement is the key concept and is related to quality of life which is impacted by the level of functional limitation and handicap
  13. Physical function
    sensorimotor skills required to perform ADLs and goal directed movement
  14. Psychological function
    intellectual activities such as motivation, concentration, problem solving and judgement.
  15. Affective Function
    Allows a person to cope with everyday stresses, anxiety, depression, emotional well-being and self-esteem.
  16. Social function
    ability to interact with other people and successfully complete roles and obligations.
  17. Theory of Cognitive Development
    Individuals ultimate goal is to master the environment
  18. Adaptation
    basic need to permit a person to function in a given environment
  19. Assimilation
    • Changing elements of the environment so they can be incorporated into the organism's structure.
    • eg: all 4 legged animals are dogs
  20. Accomodation
    • Changing of function in accordance with the environment.
    • eg: a cow is a big dog
  21. What are the 4 stages of Piaget's
    • - Sensorimotor (birth - 2 years)
    • - Preoperational (2 - 7 years)
    • - Concrete Operatioion (7-10 years)
    • - Formal Operations (12+)
  22. Erikson's Theory
    • - Trust vs. Mistrust
    • - Autonomy vs. Shame
    • - Initiative vs. guilt
    • - Industry vs. Inferiority
    • - Intimacy vs. Isolation
    • - Identity vs. role confusion
    • - Generativity vs. stagnation
    • - Ego vs dispair
  23. Freud's Stages
    • - Oral
    • - Anal
    • - Phallic
    • - Latency
    • - Genital
  24. Mazlow's theory of motivation
    - A person must achieve basic needs before moving to a higher levels of needs
  25. Types of needs for Mazlow's
    • 1) Self-actualization needs - realizing one's full potential as a human being
    • 2) Esteem needs - need to feel good about one's capabilities, be respected by others and receive respect and appreciation.
    • 3) Affiliative needs - need for stability, security and a safe environment.
    • 4) Physiological needs -
  26. 2 theories of learning
    • - Pavlov's
    • - Skinners theory of Operant Conditioning
  27. Skinner's 4 consequences
    • - Positive reinforcement
    • - Negative reinforcement
    • - Extinction
    • - Punishment
  28. Skinner's types of reinforcement
    • - Continuous
    • - Partial
    • - Fixed interval
    • - Variable interval
  29. 3 domains of human performance
    • - Cognitive
    • - Affective
    • - Psychomotor
  30. Guideline's for program design to promote learning
    • - design a program that incorporates patient's past experiences
    • - encourage patient to play active role in their program
    • - demonstrate relevance
    • - Provide opportunities for practive and feedback
    • - recognize improvement in patients performance
  31. Two theories of development
    • - Heirarchial
    • - Dynamic Systems
  32. Heierarchial Theory
    • - Traditional model
    • - CNS is the prime determinant of human motor function
  33. Dynamic Systems Theory
    • - Motor control is a result of many portion of the nervous system
    • - Behavior is the result of variable interaction of a number of complex systems
    • - Emergent/Anticipatory control
  34. Emergent control
    • - present
    • - task is altered in many ways to meet current conditions
  35. Anticipatory control
    • - Future
    • - Task will be altered to meet environment
  36. 4 areas of cultural schemas
    • - Personal: traits exhibited by a person
    • - Self: culturally supported traits that are assigned to self
    • - Role: person's social position within the culture
    • - Event: culturally predicted order and sequence of event
  37. Types of poverty
    • - Absolute: basic needs are a challenge
    • - Relative: can afford basic necesseties but, cannot maintain average lifestyle
  38. Periods of development
    • - Prenatal: conception to birth
    • - Infancy: birth to 18/24 months
    • - Early childhood: infancy to 5/6
    • - Middle/Late childhood: 5/6-11
    • - Adolescence: 10/12-20/22
    • - Early Adulthood: 20/22-39
    • - Middle Adulthood: -60's
    • - Late Adulthood (young-old) 65-74
    • - Late Adulthood (old-old): 75 on
  39. Social Theories of Aging
    • - Disengagement theory: turning inward and distancing one self from family/friends
    • - Activity Theory: Activity is positively correlated with happiness in old age, when activity ceases, we die!
  40. Components of movement that need to be considered in therapy
    • - Flexibility
    • - Balance
    • - Coordination
    • - Power
    • - Endurance

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