UTSD Dental Anatomy Exam 4 Terms

Card Set Information

Author:
Anonymous
ID:
178215
Filename:
UTSD Dental Anatomy Exam 4 Terms
Updated:
2012-10-18 17:16:32
Tags:
UTSD Dental Anatomy Occlusion Exam
Folders:

Description:
UTSD Dental Anatomy Occlusion Exam Frey
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user Anonymous on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. Anterior Guidance
    the functional relationship of the maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth which control mandibular movement.
  2. Articulator
    a mechanical device which represents the temporomandibular joints, the mandible and the maxillae to which diagnostic casts may be attached to simulate manidbular movements.
  3. Centric Occlusion
    - the occlusion of the teeth when the jaws are closed together in the normal position. Synonyms for centric occlusion are (1) maximum intercuspation, (2) habitual centric, (3) acquired centric and (4) the intercuspal position. Centric occlusion is a "tooth to tooth" relationship and may easily be affected by dental treatment.
  4. Centric Relation
    the most superior position of the condyles in the glenoid fossae with the discs in place. Centric relation is a mandible to cranium relationship, nQ1 a tooth to tooth relationship. Centric relation is reproducible and can be used as a starting point for many restorative procedures.
  5. Condylar Guidance
    the functional relationship of the hard and soft tissues of the temporomandibular joints which control mandibular movement
  6. Cuspid Rise
    (cuspid protected occlusion) cuspid on working side is the only tooth contacting in a working side movement. All other posterior teeth are not in occlusal contact.
  7. Deglutition
    the act or process of swallowing of food. During swallOWing in the adult, the mandible is stabilized by bringing the teeth into centric occlusion and the like are brought together in order to seal the oral cavity.
  8. Diagnostic Casts
    a positive likeness of a part or parts of the oral cavity for the purpose of study and treatment planning.
  9. Dynamic Occlusion
    there is a movement and/or force involved when one chews, bites, holds object or clenches the teeth. This movement or application of force between the arches is dynamic occlusion. (see "Static Occlusion")
  10. Facebow
    an instrument which records the relation of the maxillary dental arch to the cranium for transfer of the maxillary cast to the articulator.
  11. Freeway Space
    the distance between the occluding surfaces of the maxillary and mandibular teeth when the mandible is in its physiologic rest position. The normal amount of freeway space is 2-4 millimeters.
  12. Group Function
    Cuspid and posterior teeth on the working side contact evenly as a unit in working side movement.
  13. Hinge Opening
    In the initial phase of opening from centric relation, the condyles hinge or rotate around a fixed transverse axis. This phase of opening is called hinge opening and occurs for the first 20-25 millimeters of opening. (See "Translatory Opening.)
  14. Intercuspation
    deals with the centric occlusion relationship of the multicusped posterior teeth. As these teeth occlude, some of the cusps contact the opposing tooth or teeth. Other cusps do not contact the opposing tooth or teeth; they overlap the buccal or lingual surfaces of the opposing teeth.
  15. Interdigitation
    It is during the static phase of occlusion that tooth positions in the arch and their relations to opposing teeth are noted. In general each tooth occludes or functions with two opposing teeth. This relationship is known as interdigitation and the pattern is an established one.
  16. Exceptions to Interdigitation
    The two exceptions to the concept of interdigitation are the mandibular central incisors and the maxillary third molars. These teeth typically interdigitate with only one opposing tooth. A mandibular central incisor interdigitates with the opposingmaxillary central incisor. A maxillary third molar interdigitates with the opposing mandibular molar.
  17. Malocclusion
    the condition which exists when opposing teeth do not occlude in accordance with an acceptable standard.
  18. Occlusal Adjustment/Equilibration
    a reshaping of the teeth to result in a more physiologic relation of the teeth, their supporting structures, the muscles of mastication and/or the temporomandibular joints.
  19. Occlusal Interference
    an occlusal contact which alters or restricts mandibular movement.
  20. Occlusal Prematurity
    an occlusal contact where opposing teeth touch prior to the other teeth.
  21. Occlusal Splint
    an artificial occlusal appliance used to modify the occlusion on a temporary or trial basis.
  22. Physiologic Rest Position
    the postural position of the mandible when the head is in an upright position and the associated muscles are in a state of minimal contraction. The physiologic rest position has also been referred to as the postural rest position and the clinical rest position.
  23. Static Occlusion
    when the teeth touch lightly together in centric occlusion with the jaws relaxed so that there is neither force nor movement.
  24. Translatory Opening
    the second phase of opening in which the condyles glide or translate down the articular eminences. This phase of opening is preceded by hinge opening.
  25. Supporting/Centric Cusps
    crush food into the opposing fossae and/or between the marginal ridges (occlusal embrasures).
  26. Non-Supporting/Non-Centric Cusps
    overlap and in some instances gUide the centric cusps into occlusion. The opposing inclined surfaces of the centric and non-centric cusps provide the shearing action for food comminution.
  27. Maxillary Centric Cusps
    all the lingual cusps of the maxillary premolars and molars. The lingual cusps of the maxillary premolars and the distolingual cusps of maxillary molars make contact on the distal marginal ridges of opposing mandibular teeth. The alternate centric stops for these cusps are the opposing mesial marginal ridges. The mesiolingual cusps of the maxillary molars contact the central fossae of the opposing mandibular molars.
  28. Mandibular Centric Cusps
    the buccal cusps of the mandibular premolars and molars. The buccal cusps of the mandibular premolars and the mesiobuccal cusps of the mandibular molars make contact on the mesial marginal ridges of opposing maxillary teeth.
  29. Cusp-Marginal Ridge Occlusion
    The alternate centric stops for these cusps are the opposing distal marginal ridges.
  30. Cusp-Fossae Occlusion
    The distobuccal cusps of the mandibular molars contact the central fossae of the opposing maxillary molars.
  31. Tooth providing the basis for morphological classification of occlusion
    Mandibular First Molar
  32. Class I Ideal Occlusion
    When the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar opposes the mesiobuccal developmental groove of the mandibular first molar
  33. Requirements of Class I Ideal Occlusion
    • 1. ideal interdigitation
    • 2. ideal skeletal relationship
    • 3. ideal overjet
    • 4. ideal overbite
    • 5. no impactions
    • 6. no missing teeth
    • 7. no supernumerary teeth
  34. Class I Malocclusion
    If one or more of the seven requirements of Class 1 Ideal Occlusion is not met and the MB cusp of the Max 1st opposes the MB Dev Groove
  35. Class II Malocclusion
    the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first permanent • molar is anterior to the mesiobuccal developmental groove of the mandibular first there are division 1 and 2. Division 1 is if there is excessive overjet of anterior teeth. Division 2 if there is excessive lingual inclination of the maxillary central incisors and an excessive labial inclination of the maxillary lateral incisors
  36. Class III Malocclusion
    the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillarv first permanent molar is posterior to the mesiobuccal developmental groove of the mandibular first permanent molar. The anterior teeth may or may not be in cross bite
  37. Positions of Mandible To Consider in Restorations
    Centric Occlusion and Protrustive Movement
  38. Incisal Guide Table
    is the mechanical equivalent on the articulator to the anterior guidance of the patient
  39. 3 uses of incisal guide table
    • 1. it protects the anterior teeth on mounted stone models from wear during excursive movements
    • 2. it may reproduce and maintain existing anterior guidance during the fabrication of anterior restorations
    • 3. it may reproduce and maintain provisional anterior guidance during the fabrication of temporary crowns and final restorations
  40. Posselt's Diagram
    •   represents border movements in the  mid-sagittal  plane
    • they are: 
    • 1. maximum protrusion
    • 2. incisal edge-to-edge position
    • 3. centric occlusion
    • 4. centric relation
    • 5. masticatory cycle
    • 6. hinge opening
    • 7. normal opening
    • 8. maximum opening
    • • postural rest position

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview