DEOMITest6

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Deleon
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DEOMITest6
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2012-11-26 22:49:09
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EOAC DEOMI Test6
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Prep for Test 6 @ DEOMI EO Advisor's course
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  1. Goal of the EO Program
    facilitates an environment free from personal, social, or institutional barriers that prevent Service members from rising to the highest level of responsibility possible.
  2. Identify specific roles and responsibilities that contribute or factor into a successful EO Program
    • Commanders and leaders are responsible for unit EO
    • Commanders and leaders must promote harmony
    • Commanders and leaders must support individual and cultural diversity
    • Commanders and leaders must ensure that discipline is maintained
    • Commanders and leaders must provide fair and equal treatment of unit members and employees
  3. State expected role behaviors for EOA tasks
    • Advisor
    • Trainer and Educator
    • Assessor
    • Change Agent
  4. Identify proficiency levels associated with EO duties
    • Knowledge
    • Skills
    • Abilities
    • Other
  5. What proficiency level must the EOA have in the following areas:
    -Mission and unit.
    -Policies, procedures, and regulations.
    -Organizational and socialization systems.
    -Problem-solving methodology and organizational assessment.
    -Background on topics relating to human relations (past and present).
    -Self and others.
    Knowledge
  6. What proficiency level should the EOA have in the following areas
    -Communication.
    -Observation.
    -Instruction and persuasion.
    -Team building and teamwork.
    -Assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating (APIE).
    -Problem solving.
    Skill
  7. What proficiency level should the EOA have in the following areas
    -Flexibility.
    -Expression, both written and oral.
    -Problem sensitivity.
    -Concentration.
    Ability
  8. In what other characteristics or work styles should the EOA show proficiency
    • Professionalism.
    • Objectivity.
    • Maturity.
    • Sensitivity.
    • Open-mindedness.
  9. When an EOA provides guidance and assistance to commanders, unit leaders, Servicemembers, subordinate commands, and civilian employees, what role is the EOA playing?
    Advisor
  10. In what role does the EOA make commanders, leaders, and Service members aware of the EO program, policies, procedures, and issues that impact the EO climate and unit readiness.
    Trainer & Educator
  11. In what role does the EOA determining whether the climate is healthy and positive and recommend actions to improve unhealthy or negative climates.
    Assessor
  12. In what role does the EOA implementing recommendations to the EO program and other related areas that affect the command climate of the organization.
    change agent
  13. Who complies with the EO program and ensures that the unit members and civilian employees know the policy and what is expected from them. Who enforces compliance with the EO policies as established.
    Commanders and leaders
  14. Who is responsible for correcting deficiencies and using reasonable and consistent standards for everyone by interacting with subordinates thereby spotting inappropriate behavior and taking immediate corrective action.
    Commanders and leaders
  15. Who is responsible for being aware of, and showing respect for, the religious, cultural, and gender differences of other personnel and ensuring everyone is be capable of living and working in a common environment.
    Commanders and leaders
  16. An environment free from personal, social, or institutional barriers that prevent Service members from rising to the highest level of responsibility possible.
    The EO program
  17. Define values
    conceptions of what is good or bad, desirable or not, and proper or improper.
  18. Define morals
    beliefs about right and wrong conduct, about what we should do in light of our values.
  19. Define ethics
    standards of conduct governing an individual or an organization and developed through continual reflection of right and wrong
  20. Identify moral theory
    Considering those actions to be the most ethical that will bring the greatest benefit to the greatest number, or that enable the unit to fulfill the mission.
  21. When choosing between options, what process considers the right conduct for yourself and others.
    The ethical decision making process
  22. the creation of an equitable and inclusive environment that enhances the contribution of all members to fulfill the organization’s mission; where differences are recognized, understood, and valued; and is accomplished through communication, education, policies, programs, selection, retention, mentoring, leadership, and individual accountability
    Diversity management
  23. In what process are differences recognized, understood, and valued in order to create an inclusive environment
    Diversity Management
  24. What process involves the creation of an equitable environment through communication, education, policies, programs, selection, retention, mentoring, leadership, and individual accountability
    Diversity Management
  25. What focuses on preventing and/or correcting discriminatory practices; is an attempt to rectify past discrimination; but does not set goals or require that individuals be hired.
    Affirmative Action
  26. List primary dimensions of diversity (internal dimensions)
    • Age
    • Ethnicity
    • Gender
    • Mental/physical abilities and characteristics
    • Race
    • Sexual orientation.
  27. List Secondary Dimensions (External Dimensions)
    • Communication style
    • Education
    • Family status
    • Military experience
    • Religion
    • First language
    • Income
    • Work experience
    • Work style.
  28. Which dimension of diversity includes characteristics which are more immediately obvious to others and ones over which we have little to no control.
    Primary
  29. Which statement does NOT describes the characteristics in the primary dimension of diversity:

    A. the immutability and sustained power they exert throughout life separate them from those in other dimensions.
    B. life experiences are filtered through them.
    C. includes elements which may be quite permanent, changing over time, or variable in the degree of influence exerted on one's life.
    D. they shape our basic self image and fundamental world view.
    C. includes elements which may be quite permanent, changing over time, or variable in the degree of influence exerted on one's life.
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  30. List the characteristics of the structural or organizational dimension of diversity.
    • Military/civilian/contractor status
    • Position in organization
    • Department
    • Status
    • Rank
    • Work function
    • Tenure
    • Physical location
    • Deployment Status.
  31. List Leadership Competencies
    • Applying Cultural Knowledge
    • Organizational Awareness
    • Cultural Perspective Taking
    • Communication
    • Interpersonal Skills
    • Cultural Adaptability
    • Leading Others
  32. What is included in the leadership competency of Applying Cultural Knowledge
    Applies knowledge of factual information about the history of the racial, ethnic, and gender groups in the United States, as well as the past and current (a) social, (b) political, (c) cultural, and (d) economic situation

    Recognizes the impact of the historical development of civil rights and diversity in the United States

    Differentiates between representational diversity, inclusion, diversity climate, and employee engagement.
  33. Organizational Awareness
    Understands the mission and functions of one’s own organization, and how diversity connects to the mission

    Comprehends the regulatory requirements of EEO/EO and distinguishes both the differences and linkages with diversity

    Operates effectively within the organization by applying knowledge of how the organization’s programs, policies, procedures, rules, and regulations may either enhance or create barriers for representational diversity and inclusion.
  34. Cultural Perspective Taking
    Demonstrates an awareness of one’s own cultural assumptions, values, preferences, and biases, and understands how one’s own identity group is viewed by members of other identity groups.

    Applies perspective-taking skills to detect, analyze, and consider the point-of-view of others and recognizes how others will interpret his/her actions.

    Understands the formation of social identity, privilege, and bias structures, and can identify when they may be at play in organizational processes.

    Analyzes the cultural context when interpreting environmental cues.
  35. What is involved in the leadership competency of Communication
    Recognizes and manages both verbal and non-verbal cues about personal attitudes toward diversity in general and racial, ethnic, and gender groups specifically.

    Distinguishes the impact of racial, ethnic, and gender culture on communication behaviors, and can identify when they may create conflict or misunderstanding among work groups.

    Listens carefully to others, paying close attention to the speaker’s point-of-view.

    Communicates thoughts and ideas in a way that is relevant to the listener.

    Adjusts communication style to meet expectations of audience.

    Seeks additional clarifying information when necessary.
  36. What is involved in the leadership competency of Interpersonal Skills
    Develops and maintains positive rapport by showing respect, courtesy, and tact with others.

    Interacts effectively with a variety of people.

    Relates and adjusts well to people from varied backgrounds in different situations.

    Engages in self-management when personal biases are activated or present.
  37. What is involved in the leadership competency of Cultural Adaptability
    Understands the implications of one’s actions and adjusts approach to maintain positive and bias-free relationships with individuals or groups of other racial, ethnic, or gender cultures.

    Gathers and interprets information about people and surroundings to increase awareness about how to interact with others.

    Integrates well into situations in which people have different values, customs, and cultures.

    Shows respect for others’ values and customs.
  38. What is involved in the leadership competency of Leading Others
    Creates an inclusive environment.

    Takes a multicultural, versus colorblind, approach when interacting with others.

    Sets, communicates, and maintains standards for all.

    Seeks and accepts feedback on diversity-related issues.

    Creates focus on super-ordinate identity (team) and task.

    Recognizes the diversity issues present in cross-dyad mentoring.

    Focuses on performance results, not performance style.

    Ensures decisions and behaviors reflect fairness.

    Develops direct reports and fosters talent throughout organization.
  39. Leadership Competencies
    • 1. Applying Cultural Knowledge:
    • Applies knowledge of factual information about the history of the racial, ethnic, and gender groups in the United States, as well as the past and current (a) social, (b) political, (c) cultural, and (d) economic situation.
    • Recognizes the impact of the historical development of civil rights and diversity in the United States.
    • Differentiates between representational diversity, inclusion, diversity climate, and employee engagement.

    • 2. Organizational Awareness:
    • Understands the mission and functions of one’s own organization, and how diversity connects to the mission.
    • Comprehends the regulatory requirements of EEO/EO and distinguishes both the differences and linkages with diversity.
    • Operates effectively within the organization by applying knowledge of how the organization’s programs, policies, procedures, rules, and regulations may either enhance or create barriers for representational diversity and inclusion.

    • 3. Cultural Perspective Taking:
    • Demonstrates an awareness of one’s own cultural assumptions, values, preferences, and biases, and understands how one’s own identity group is viewed by members of other identity groups.
    • Applies perspective-taking skills to detect, analyze, and consider the point-of-view of others and recognizes how others will interpret his/her actions.
    • Understands the formation of social identity, privilege, and bias structures, and can identify when they may be at play in organizational processes.
    • Analyzes the cultural context when interpreting environmental cues.

    • 4. Communication:
    • Recognizes and manages both verbal and non-verbal cues about personal attitudes toward diversity in general and racial, ethnic, and gender groups specifically.
    • Distinguishes the impact of racial, ethnic, and gender culture on communication behaviors, and can identify when they may create conflict or misunderstanding among work groups.
    • Listens carefully to others, paying close attention to the speaker’s point-of-view.
    • Communicates thoughts and ideas in a way that is relevant to the listener.
    • Adjusts communication style to meet expectations of audience.
    • Seeks additional clarifying information when necessary.

    • 5. Interpersonal Skills:
    • Develops and maintains positive rapport by showing respect, courtesy, and tact with others.
    • Interacts effectively with a variety of people.
    • Relates and adjusts well to people from varied backgrounds in different situations.
    • Engages in self-management when personal biases are activated or present.

    • 6. Cultural Adaptability:
    • Understands the implications of one’s actions and adjusts approach to maintain positive and bias-free relationships with individuals or groups of other racial, ethnic,or gender cultures.
    • Gathers and interprets information about people and surroundings to increase awareness about how to interact with others.
    • Integrates well into situations in which people have different values, customs, and cultures.
    • Shows respect for others’ values and customs.

    • 7. Leading Others:
    • Creates an inclusive environment.
    • Takes a multicultural, versus color blind, approach when interacting with others.
    • Sets, communicates, and maintains standards for all. 
    • Seeks and accepts feedback on diversity-related issues.
    • Creates focus on super-ordinate identity (team) and task.
    • Recognizes the diversity issues present in cross-dyad mentoring.
    • Focuses on performance results, not performance style.
    • Ensures decisions and behaviors reflect fairness.
    • Develops direct reports and fosters talent throughout organization.
  40. What are structural barrier to diversity management
    Policies or practices within the organization that impede full inclusion.
  41. Strategies for Implementing Diversity Management
    1. Commitment to Change: “Perhaps the single most important element of successfulmanagement improvement initiatives is the demonstrated commitment of top leaders tochange”

    2. Leadership Responsibility: Leaders and managers within organizations are primarilyresponsible for the success of diversity management

    3. Resources: They must provide the visibility and commit the time and necessary resources

    4. Communication: Communicate the organization’s support for diversity in newsletters, policy statements, speeches, meetings, and websites
  42. Name the 9 special observances and the months they are celebrated
    • Martin Luther King Birthday: January
    • African-American/Black History Month: February
    • Women's History Month: March
    • Days of Remebrance of the Victims of the Holocaust: April/May
    • Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage: May
    • Women's Equality Day: August
    • National Hispanic Heritage Month: 15 September-15 October
    • National Disability Employment Awareness Month: October
    • National American Indian Heritage Month: November
  43. Duties and Responsibilities of Organizing Personnel and Committees for Special Observances
    Project Officer: Oversees the overall planning, coordination, and execution of the event. This may or may not be the EOA. Utilizes the coordination checklist in the execution of these duties. Refer to Guidance for Organizing Observances.

    Observance Scheduling Committee:  Suggests the timeline and prepares a schedule for the special observance.

    Planning Committee: Develops a proposed agenda of events and activities that includes estimated costs.

    Finance Committee: Determines the dollar amount available from the Resource Management office.

    Publicity Committee: Plans, develops, and implements publicity programs to increase awareness of activities and events scheduled in support of the observance.

    Education Committee: Plans, develops, and implements educational programs to increase awareness of historical and cultural accomplishments and achievements.

    Luncheon/Banquet Subcommittee: Coordinates dates and obtains reservations for the luncheon or banquet.

    Protocol Subcommittee: Responsible for the guest speaker(s).
  44. An allegation of unlawful discrimination or sexual harassment, made either orally or in writing, which is not addressed through formal channels.
    informal complaint
  45. An allegation of unlawful discrimination or sexual harassment that is submitted in writing to the authority designated for receipt of such complaints in Services implementing regulations.
    Formal complaint
  46. Difference between formal and informal complaints
    Informal complaint: made either orally or in writing; not addressed throughformal channels.

    Formal complaint: submitted in writing to the authority designated for receipt of such complaints in Services implementing regulations.
  47. Role of EOA in complaint processing
    Processing and resolving complaints of unlawful discrimination and sexual harassment

    ensures human relations and EO matters pertaining to equal opportunity and treatment are taken seriously and acted upon, as necessary.
  48. Steps of the intake interview process
    • 1. Open interview:
    • a. Greet the interviewee promptly and cordially.
    • b. Establish a rapport with the interviewee.
    • c. Establish procedures of the interview.
    • d. Explain the limits of anonymity/confidentiality.
    • e. Acknowledge the time limitations.
    • f. Explain the purpose of note-taking.
    • g. Explain resolution avenues, if applicable.

    • 2. Body
    • a. Allow the interviewee to tell his/her story.
    • b. Ask open-ended questions.
    • c. Maintain control of the interview.
    • d. Maintain strict impartiality.
    • e. Maintain appropriate eye contact.
    • f. Paraphrase the interviewee at times.
    • g. Listen attentively.
    • h. Accept/acknowledge interviewee’s feelings.
    • i. Use selective and flexible techniques.
    • j. Maintain positive nonverbal communications.

    • 3. Closing the interview
    • a. Summarize the information gathered.
    • b. Ask if interviewee has anything to add.
    • c. Explain the procedures of the complaint process.
    • d. Discuss reprisal.
    • e. Discuss future follow-up.
    • f. Extend appreciation to interviewee.

    • 4. Follow up on the interview
    • a. You would follow-up on the interview only if needed (i.e. witnesses, supervisors). However, it is considered a best practice to follow-up with the complainant.
  49. Purpose of an Organizational Assessment
    Assist commanders at all levels in determining their command’s climate; identifies and measures those factors, both positive and negative, that may affect mission readiness, such as unit morale, equal opportunity and treatment, interpersonal relationships, and communication; provides a snap-shot in time.
  50. Assist commanders at all levels in determining their command’s climate; identifies and measures those factors, both positive and negative, that may affect mission readiness, such as unit morale, equal opportunity and treatment, interpersonal relationships, and communication; provides a snap-shot in time.
    Organizational Assessment
  51. When is an OA not appropriate
    In place of a complaint/incident clarification/investigation.

    To determine the competency level of an individual.

    As a mechanism to terminate employment.
  52. What are the two assessment options in the scope of an OA
    Informal: out-and-about or daily observations.

    Formal – pre-prepared assessment tools, strict guidelines; includes the DEOCS, unit climate assessments, command climate surveys, and interviews.
  53. Types of an OA
    • out-and-about
    • daily observations.
    • DEOCS
    • unit climate assessments
    • command climate surveys
    • interviews
  54. Assessment consideration factors
    Time - Set realistic time limits which create as little interference as possible with the regular work of the elements assessed. What is the time required to achieve the desired results? The time necessary to conduct a thorough assessment will vary depending on its scope. Generally, thirty days is a reasonable time limit. Conducting an assessment over a longer period might jeopardize the quality of the information. However, in some circumstances and dependent on unit mission, OPTEMPO, deployment ops, etc., a longer or shorter assessment period may be necessary. How much time can the commander give for the assessment?

    Space - Do we have private interview rooms? Is there a large enough space to do focus groups? Can you get interviewees to a central location, or do you have to go to multiple off-sites?

    Personnel (e.g., military and civilian members, contractors, host national employees) - Does your unit consist of military members, civilians, and contractors? Do agreements or contracts allow for their participation? Will trust and anonymity effect participation?

    Current OPTEMPO and the availability of personnel - What is currently on the unit’s short term schedule? Are people preparing for deployment/redeployment, field exercises, in garrison, on-station? Are they on block leave or in the unit?

    Unit location - Are we in port or at sea? Are we in a remote location or in CONUS? Are all units collocated or in numerous distant areas?

    Accessibility - Does the EOA have an appropriate security clearance/badge? Can the EOA get into secure areas/secure spaces to observe people? Does the EOA have to coordinate with security to get out of operating bases to outlying areas?

    Paper versus online - Are computers available? Where? How many? Does the unit have Internet accessibility? Is bandwidth sufficient for survey document administration/processing?

    Survey team size - Is a single EOA conducting the assessment, or is a team available? The EOA describes the specific capabilities of the OA team when selecting a strategy.

    Other factors might also impact the assessment process, including the EOA’s experience and/or training, commander/leadership commitment, and unit members’ perceptions of the EO system.
  55. Courses of action after identifying OA climate factors
    • Validate with other tools: records & reports, interviews, observations
    • Prepare presentation & schedule outbrief
  56. Purpose and advantages of surveys
    • provide a diagnosis of potential organizational issues
    • represent a critical first step in obtaining information provide a substantial amount of information about an organization’s climate
    • individuals can answer anonymously
    • Anonymity leads to openness. If you eliminate the fear of attribution/ retribution,people will be more open.
    • Provides perceptions about major organizational issues.
    • Monitors effectiveness of new interventions.
    • Involvement leads to ownership/commitment to decisions. Let individuals know that their input is important and used in the decision-making process.
  57. Breakdown of the DEOCS core 66 questions
    • The first 13 questions collect demographic data (e.g., sex, race, ethnicity, organizational affiliation, military rank/civilian step. Deployment status is also included for research purposes (e.g., less than six months or never deployed, more than six months, non-combat zone, or more than six months, combat zone).
    • Approximately half of the items address EO/EEO issues.
    • The remaining questions measure perceptions of organizational effectiveness.
  58. Forms of interviews
    • Personal
    • Focus Group
  59. Advantages of focus group interviews
    • Time: Can be more time effective because more than one person is being interviewed; more information may be gathered in the same amount of time devoted to one individual interview.
    • Commonality of perception: Can test commonality of perceptions of a number of people. If several people validate a particular statement or response, the statement may have more validity in the overall analysis or diagnosis.
    • Group interaction: Encourage individuals to form opinions about the designated topic through interaction with others.
    • Valuable information: Group interaction will often produce elaboration on responses and the sharing of ideas. One comment may be a building block to other comments or information critical to the assessment. The group format offers support for individual participants and encourages greater openness in their responses.
    • Formal communication check: Can provide a check on the information channels and patterns in a unit. The EOA gains insight through listening to participants, who use their words and expressions to communicate their experiences. The format encourages interaction, not only between the facilitator and the participants, but also among the participants themselves.
  60. disadvantages of focus group interviews:
    • o Anonymity: Focus groups cannot offer the level of anonymity that personalinterviews or surveys provide.
    • Trust: If there is no trust between the group and the facilitator, between the group members themselves, or within the organization, the interview will not produce valuable information.
    • Expectations: Some members of the group may want immediate results or may expect prompt changes.
    • Commonality of perception: Group perceptions sometimes lead to group think. One person initiates an idea and others group members adopt it without reflection or true validation. Interviewees may believe that because the EOA is here to ask questions and listen to our concerns, the EOA is going to fix all our problems.
    • Threat: The senior person may perceive a group interview as a threat to his/her position or program.
    • Genuine: The focus group methodology is not a reliable technique for determining an individual’s genuine point of view. Social norms can also get in the way. For example, during a focus group, a participant may affirm another participant by saying, ―Right, couldn’t have said it better; however, the EOA must not assume that the individual has provided his or her final opinion on the matter. It is plausible that the individual was only being supportive rather than honest.
    • Skills of facilitator(s): The success of a group facilitator is highly dependent upon the facilitator’s skills in handling group situations and dynamics. Focus groups are more difficult than one-on-one interviews to control, as they are larger and multiple opinions may vie for attention.
    • Subjective bias: Individuals within the group may be biased and try to establish an agenda.
  61. advantages of the personal interview
    • Flexibility: A skilled facilitator can search out relevant issues that emerge as theinterview progresses.
    • Involvement: One-on-one interviews may produce a greater sense of involvement and commitment among interviewees, and lead to more direct and honest answers.
    • Clarity: Since the facilitator takes an active role in helping the respondent understand questions, there is less chance the questions will be misunderstood.
    • Intimacy: One-on-one interviews are intimate; therefore, they may lead to more direct and honest answers. Interviews are often thought to be stimulators for both the person interviewed and the facilitator. The informality of an interview may cause people to give information which would not otherwise occur to them or which they would hesitate to submit in written form.
    • Time: May or may not be an advantage depending on facilitator skills, number of persons to be interviewed, and depth of the interview itself. It depends on the circumstances.
  62. disadvantages of the personal interview
    Time: Conducting numerous individual interviews can take a great deal of time and elicit a great deal of information that may be difficult to decipher and often obtains conflicting responses. The facilitator must strive to keep a complete record of the interview. This record must often be hastily written, and errors may result.

    Sample size: Time makes it difficult to interview a large number people, which may reduce the sample size.

    • Validity: Such things as the facilitator’s lack of experience, improperly used techniques, questionable interpretation, and small sample size may provide invalid data.
    • The person interviewed is often asked to give information without having had an opportunity to thoroughly check the facts or think through what he is saying. The interviewee may give information that is not precisely accurate; or she may be so cautious that she withholds valuable information because she is not absolutely positive of its accuracy.
    • When people are interviewed, they often feel that they should know the answers to all questions asked. They may, therefore, answer questions with guesses rather than admit their ignorance.
    • Some people unconsciously try to answer questions the way they believe the facilitator wants them answered, instead of stating their true beliefs.

    Training: It is easier to teach a person to administer a survey than to be an effective one-on-one facilitator.
  63. Advantages of observations
    Provides data about behavior itself, rather than reports of behavior. While people in the organization may doubt the validity of questionnaire responses and may attempt to deny the validity of interview data by arguing that people did not answer truthfully, well-documented observational data possess a great deal of strength and believability because you are collecting data as the behavior occurs.

    Furnishes real-time data collection, not information on past events. Observation deals with behavior that is occurring now. People tend to reinterpret earlier events in the light of what occurred later, which can affect how these are reported.
  64. Disadvantages of observations
    May never observe relevant behaviors. The observer may miss the opportunity to validate perceptions identified from the sources (e.g. surveys and interviews).

    Interpretation/coding required to use data. As with interviews, interpretation and coding take time and skill.

    • The EOA has to determine what to observe (e.g., sampling). Observation takes time, and observing an entire unit’s operation may not be practical. A cross-section to be examined has to be determined. The following are critical questions of sampling:
    • What events should be observed?
    • What locations within the organization should be given the most attention?
    • What types of behavior should be recorded?
    • When should observations be conducted?

    Training - Just like facilitators, observers must be adequately trained so that different observers will see the same things when viewing an event.

    Location - EOAs need to decide when observation will be used in the OA process and when and where it will occur.
  65. Purpose of records and reports
    • Records and reports are used to identify ―hard or unchangeable data about the command. These data are used to prove or disprove, support or oppose, or quantify perceptions from other data sources
    • Some EOAs consistently consolidate and review report data quarterly. Others may only look at data prior to beginning an OA or to compare it to other assessment areas.
    • Some data will be qualitative (e.g, unit logs, policy, regulations), while others are numerically based (e.g., awards, discipline, promotions).
    • Records reviews can be conducted before or after surveys.
    • EOAs are not Inspectors General (IG). EOAs assess the HR climate. You are not going to look at every possible record or report. Rather, based on indicators you’ve seen in the survey or during interviews and observations, you will select certain areas to explore.
  66. Which of the following is a reason for looking at record and reports?

    A. They provide anonymous data
    B. a lot of info can be gathered in a short amount of time
    C. they provide hard data that is difficult to change
    D. they provide the most accurate representation of the command's EO state
    C. they provide hard data that is difficult to change
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)
  67. During what month or months is Women's history observed?

    A. March
    B. parts of August and September
    C. February
    D. July
    A. March
    (this multiple choice question has been scrambled)

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