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DesLee26
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Quotes
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2012-12-10 19:25:47
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  1. Where war and wrack and wonder
    By shifts have sojourned there, 
    And bliss by turns with blunder
    In that land's lot had share
    • It is the first wheel in Sir Gawain
    • It opens the play after giving an outline of hte history of Rome
  2. But Arthur would not eat till allw ere served; so light was his lordly heart, adn a little boyish. His life he liked lively--the less he cared To be lying for long, or long to sit, So busy his young blood, his brain so wild. And also a point of pride pricked him in heart.
    This is in the beginning and it shows up in the context of the description of Arthur's New Year celebrations where hte people would come together for a feast. 
  3. For he nobly had willed, he would never eat on so high a holiday, till he had heard first of some fair feat or fray, some far-borne tale, of some marvel of might, that he might trust, by champions of chivalry achieved in arms, or some suppliant came seeking some single knight to join with him in jousting, in jeopardy each to lay life for life, and leave it to fortune to afford him on field fair hap or otehr
    This is in the beginning and it shows up in the context of the description of Arthur's New Year celebrations where hte people would come together for a feast. 
  4. Of the service itself I need say no more, 
    For well you will know no tittle was wanting.
    Another noise and a new was well-nigh at hand
    That the lord might have leave his life to nourish;
    For scarce were the sweet strains still in the hall, 
    And the first course come to that company fair,
    There hurtles in at the hall-door an unknown rider,
    One the greatest on ground in growth of his frame;
    From borad neck to buttocks so bulky and thick,
    And his loins and his legs so long and so great, 
    Half a giant on earth I hold him to be,
    But believe him no less than the largest of men, 
    And that the seemliest in his stature to see, as he reides,
    For in back and in breast though his body was grim,
    His waist in its width was worthily small, 
    And formed with every feature in fair accord was he. 
    • This appears in the context of the Green Knight. It appears wiht the description of hte king taking before the table.
    • Gawain sits by Guenevere. 
    • It is a description of the feast, the tables, the noises, etc. 
  5. Great wonder grew in hall At his hue most strange to see, For man and gear and all were green as green could be.
    this appears in the context of the green knight entering the dining hall ; They describe him as a very large man with broad neck. He made a noise, causing hte hall to look to the door at him. 
  6. For had I come to this court on combat bent, 
    I have a hauberk at home, and a helm beside
    A shield and a sharp spear, shining bright, 
    And other weapons to wield, I ween well, to boot, 
    But as I willed no war, I wore no metal.
    But if you be so bold as all men believe
    You will graciously grant the game that I ask by right
    • Context: 
    • This appears when the Green Knight enters and Arthur addresses him (welcomes him). 
    • The Green Knight states his challenge. He first acknowledges the  praise of Arthur and his Round Table
  7. If any in this house such hardihood claims, 
    Be so bold in his blood, his brain so wild. 
    As stoutly to strike one stroke for another
    I shall give him as my gift this gisarme noble,
    This ax, that is heavy enough, to handle as he likes,
    And I shall bide the first blow, as bare as I sit. 
    If there be one so wilful my words to assay,
    Let him leap hither lightly, lay hold of this weapon;
    I quitclaim it forever, keep it as his own,
    And I shall stand him a stroke, steady on this floor,
    So you grant me the guerdon to give him another,
    sans blame.
    In a twelvemonth and a day
    He shall have of me the same; 
    Now be it seen straightway
    Who dares take up the game
    Context: The Green Knight comes in, is welcomed by Arthur. He states that he has come here strickly for combat. He wore no metal and wants to be granted the game. Arthur says he will find a fight here. But, he says, it's far from his thought. He calls a Christmas Game. THe Green Knight gets the first blow; a year and a day from now;
  8. With rage his face flushed red, 
    And so did all beside.
    Then the king as bold man bred
    Toward the stranger took a stride.
    The Green knight states his challenge and the whole hall goes silent. Noone rose to the challenge. The Green Knight questions whether it is Arthur's house whose fame is so fair in far realms and wide. They don't seem to be since they are not rising up. Arthur is embarrassed
  9. For I find it not fit, as in faith it is known
    Gawain rises up to the challenge taking Arthur's place. He doesn't want the king to do it because it is not a challenge fit for a king. 
  10. And the loss of my life would be least of any
    ...this folly befits not a king
    Gawain rises up to the challenge, taking ARthur's place. He doesn't want the king to do it because it not a challenge fit for a king. 
  11. And release the king outright
    This occurs after Gawain took the king's place in the challenge, saving the king from embarrassment
  12. Though high-born Arthur at heart had wonder,
    He let no sign be seen, but said aloud
    TO the comely queen, with courteous speech
    :Dear dame, on this day dismay you no whit;
    Such crafts are becoming at Christmastide,
    Lauging at interludes, light songs and mirth,
    Amid dancing of damsels with doughty knights.
    Nevertheless of my meat now let me partake, 
    For I have met with a marvel, I may not deny."
    He glanced at Sir Gawain, and gaily he said,
    "Now, sir, hang up your ax, that has hewn enough."
    And over the high dais it was hung on the wall
    Than men in amazement might on it look, 
    And tell in true terms the tale of the wonder.
    Then they turned toward the table, these two together, 
    The good king and Gawain, and made great feast, 
    With all dainties double dishes rare,
    With all manner of meat and minstrelsy both,
    Such happiness wholly had they that day in hold. 
    • After the challenge with the Green Knight:
    • Gawain loses. He deals his blow to the Green Knight and, alhtough his head is cut off, he simply picks it up and tells Gawain to seek him in a year. Go to the Green Chapel and it will be his turn on New Year's morn. 
  13. Now take care, Sir Gawain, 
    That your courage wax not cold
    When you must turn again 
    To your enterprise foretold
    • This is a grim warning that occurs after the Green Knight's challenge. 
    • After the challenge with the Green Knight:Gawain loses. He deals his blow to the Green Knight and, alhtough his head is cut off, he simply picks it up and tells Gawain to seek him in a year. Go to the Green Chapel and it will be his turn on New Year's morn. 
    • Arthur allows them to all eat because he has seen his marvel of hte evening. Everyone was amazed, but tehy made good feast
  14. Then they showed forth the shield, that shone allr ed, 
    With the pentangle portrayed in purest gold.
    About his broad neck by the baldric he casets it, 
    That was meet for the man, and matched him well.
    And why the pentangle is proper to that peerless prince
    I intend now to tell, though detain me it must
    It is a sign by Solomon sagely devised
    To be a token of truth, by its title of old, 
    For it is a figure formed of five points, 
    And each line is linked and locked with the next
    For ever and ever, and hence it is called
    In all England, as I hear, the endless knot. And well may he wear it on his worthy arms, 
    For ever faithful five-fold in five-fold fashion
    Was Gawain in good works as gold unalloyed 
    Devoid of all vilainy, with virtues adorned in sight
    • Context: 
    • Gawain is preparing to leave. A description of his outfit is mentioned. Gold, fur, steel rings, above the best cloth are described. The diadem is described as well.
  15. And first, he was faultless in his five sense,
    Nor ofund ever to fail in his five fingers,
    And all his fealty was fixed upon the five wounds
    That Christ got on the cross, as the creed tells;
    And wherever this man in melee took part, 
    His one thought was of this, past all things else, 
    That all his force was founded on the five joys,
    That the high Queen of heaven had in her child
    And hterefore, as I find, he fittingly had
    On the inner part of his shield her image portrayed
    That when his look on it lighted, he never lost heart.
    The fifth of the five fives followed by this knight were beneficence boundless and brotherly love
    And pure mind and manners, that none might impeach,
    And compassion most precioius--these peerless five 
    were forged and made fast in him, foremost of men.
    Now all these five fives were confirmed in this knight,
    And each linked in other, that end there was none
    And fixed to five points, whose force never failed,
    Nor assembled all on a side, nor asunder either,
    Nor anywhere at an end, but whole and entire
    However the pattern proceeded or played out its course.
    And so on his shining shield shaped was the knot
    Royally in red gold against red gules,
    That is the peerless pentangle, prized of old in lore.
    Now armed is Gawain gay, and bears his lance before, 
    And soberly said good day 
    He thoiugh forevermore
    Gawain is preparing to leave. They mention a detailed description of his shield, which contains a pentangle in purest gold and why its proper to the prince because it is a sign by Solomon to be a token of truth. It is an endless knot. The inside is Mary.
  16. Many a cliff he must climb in country wild; 
    Far off from all his friends, forlorn must he ride;
    At each strand or stream where the stalwart passed
    'Twere a marvel if he met not some monstrous foe,
    And that so fierce and forbidding that fight he must.
    So many were hte wonders he wandered among
    That to tell but the tenth part would tax my wits.
    Now with serpents he wars, now with savage wolves,
    Now with wild men of the woods, that watched from the rocks,
    Both with bulls and with bears, and with boars besides, 
    And giants that came gibbering from the jagged steeps.
    Had he not borne himself bravely, and been on God's side, 
    He had met with many mishaps and mortal harms.
    Gawain sets out on his journey. Everyone is sad that he's leaving and believe it be ill fortune. They say he was a "great leader of lords to  become, beheaded by an elf-man, for empty pride. Gawain rides sad, where he has no mate, but his horse on his journey. He goes around asking where the Green Knight lives. 
  17. Whatever I win in the woods I will give you at eve,
    And all you have earned you must offer to me
    Gawain reaches the house of a lord. The lord asks him what brought him here. Gawain tell shim that he is in search of hte Green Chapel. He tells him of hte challenge and how he has three days left to find him. He says he will follow the laws of the lord. The lord poses this wager.
  18. Against his heavy hand
    Your power cannot prevail
    Context: Gawain is being guided to the Green Chapel. A man who is leading him tells him that it is very dangerous to go against hte Green Knight. He tells hiim that he is rushing into risks that are dangerous. None passes by him with his deadly blows. He then says that if Gawain chooses to run awaay, he won't tell anyone about it. Gawain says that he cannot turn back but he must go to the Chapel to chance his luck. He has the girdle.
  19. And so, good Sir Gawain, let the grim man be;
    Go off by some other road, in God's own name!
    Leave by some other land, for the love of Christ,
    And I shall get me home again, and give you my word
    That I shall swear by God's self and the saints aboveBy heaven and by my halidom and other oaths more,
    To conceal this day's deed, nor say to a soul
    That ever you fled for fear from any that I knew."
    "Many thanks!" said the other man--and demurring he speaks--
    "Fair fortune befall you for your friendly words!
    And conceal this day's deed I doubt not you would, 
    But though you never told the tale, if I turned back now, 
    Forsook this place for fear, and fled, as you say,
    I were a caitiff coward; I could not be excused.
    But I must to the Chapel to chance my luck 
    And say to that same man such words as I please,
    Befall what may befall through Fortune's will or whim.
    Though he be a quarrelsome knave
    With a cudgel great and grim, the Lord is strong to save:
    His servants trust in Him
    Context: Gawain is being guided to the Green Chapel. A man who is leading him tells him that it is very dangerous to go against hte Green Knight. He tells hiim that he is rushing into risks that are dangerous. None passes by him with his deadly blows. He then says that if Gawain chooses to run awaay, he won't tell anyone about it. Gawain will not turn back. He has the girdle.
  20. Yet, you lacked, sir, a little in loyalty there, 
    But the cause was not cunning, nor courtship either,
    But that you loved your own life; the less, then, to blame.
    This is after hte encounter with the Green Knight. He attempts to strike him the first time, but Gawain flinches. He questions his courage and states that he did not flinch when Gawain was dealing the blow. Then, he gives him a nick on the neck. He then reveals himself to be the lord of hte house and how he employed his wife to seduce Gawain. He knew of Gawain's disobedience and the girdle that is actually his. He then tells him that he lacked in honesty towards his fellow man. This causes Gawain to become very upset and curses hsi vice. He becomes embarrassed.
  21. Behold there my falsehood, ill hap betide it!
    Your cut taught me cowardice, care for my life, And coveting came after, contrary both
    To largesse and loyalty belonging to knights.
    Now am I faulty and false, that fearful was ever
    of disloyalty and lies, bad luck to them both and greed. 
    I confess, knight, in this place,
    Most dire is my misdeed; 
    Let me gain back your good grace
    and thereafter I shall take heed.
    Context: After the encounter with the Green Knight and Gawain, the Green Knight reveals himself to be the lord and how he knew that Gawain was being dishonest by not giving him the girdle despite their covenant. He then tells him that he employed his wife to do that and knew what she gave him. He says he lacked in loyalty. gawain becomes extremely upset and curses his vices.
  22. Then hte other laughed aloud, and lightly he said
    "Such harm as I have had, I hold it quite healed. 
    You are so fully confessed, your failings made known,
    And bear the plain penance of the point of my blade,
    I hold you polished as a pearl, as pure and as bright,
    As you had lived free of fault since first you were born.
    And green as my garments, that, Gawain, you may
    Be mindful of this meeting when you mingle in throng
    With nobles of renown--and known by this token
    How it chanced at the Green Chapel to chivalrous knights
    Context: After the encounter with the Green Knight and Gawain, the Green Knight reveals himself to be the lord and how he knew that Gawain was being dishonest by not giving him the girdle despite their covenant. He then tells him that he employed his wife to do that and knew what she gave him. He says he lacked in loyalty. gawain becomes extremely upset and curses his vices. He says that his cut taught him cowardice and how he is faulty and false. He then asks to get back into the Green Knight's good grace
  23. Behold, sir" said he, and handles hte belt,
    "This is hte blazon of the blemish that I bear on my necl;
    This is the sign of sore loss that I have suffered there
    For the cowardice and coveting that I came to there;
    This is the badge of false faith that I was found in there,
    And I must bear it on my body till I breathe my last. 
    For one may keep a deed dark, but undo it no whit,
    For where a fault is made fast, it is fixed evermore."
    The king comforts the knight, and the court all together
    Agree with gay laughter and gracious intent
    THat the lords and the ladies belonging to the Table,
    Each borther of that band, a baldric should have,
    A belt borne oblique, of a bright green,
    To be worn with one accord for that worthy's sake.
    So that was taken as a token by the Table Round, 
    And he honored that had it, evermore after.
    THis is the end of the story, where Gawain returns and tries to take responsibility for his vices. Society disregards it and takes the girdle as a token of honor. Before this, the lord reveals that the idea was Morgan le Fay's who wanted to shock Guinevere to death and test hte pride of King Arthur's court
  24. To take pity on people in distress is a human quality which every man and woman should possess, but it is especially requisite in those who have once needed comfort, and found it in ohters. I number myself as one of these, because if ever anyone required or appreciated comfort, or indeed derived pleasure therefrom, I was that person. For from my earliest youth until the present day, I have been inflamed beyond measure with a most lofty and noble love, far loftier and noblier than might perhaps be thought prooper, were I to describe it, in a person of my humble condition.
    This is the opening scene of the Decameron. It is where he begins to lay out why exactly he is writing the Decameron. He sets himself up as a lover and begins to talk about how the problem isnt with the lady love but with the immoderate passion.
  25. And although people of good judgment, to whose notice it had come, praised me for it and rated me much higher in their esteem, nevertheless it was exceedingly difficult for me to endure. The reason, I hasten to add, was not the curelty of my lady-love, but the immoderate passion engendered within my mind by a craving that was ill-restrained. This, since it would allow me no proper respite, often caused me an inordinate amount of distress. But in my anguish I have on occasion derived much relief from hte agreeable conversation and the admirable expressions of sympathy offered by friends, without which I am firmly convinced that I should have perished.
    This is the opening of the Decameron where he says that to take pity on people in disterss is natural. He them begins to talk about how he was inflamed with a love that was difficult for him to endure.
  26. However, the One who is infinite decreed by immutable law that all earthly things should come to an end. And it pleased Him that this love of mine, whose warmth exceeded all others, and which had stood firm and unyielding against all the pressures of good intention, helpful advice, and the risk of danger and open scandal, should in the course of time diminish of its own accord. So that now, all that is left of it in my mind is the delectable feeling which Love habitually reserves for those who refrain from venturing too far upon its deepest waters. And thus what was once a source of pain has now become, having shed all discomfort, an abiding sensation of pleasure.
    The prologue of the Decameron where he sets himself up as a lover who was so involved with love that it was too much to endure. It was an immoderate passion that he couldn't control. His friend soffered sympathy, which withoiut it, he  would have perished. 
  27. But though the pain has ceased, I still preserve a clear recollection of the kindnesses I received in the past from people who, prompted by feelings of goodwill towards me, showed a conern for my sufferings. This memory will never, I think, fade for as long as I live. And since it is my conviction that gratitude, of all the virtues, is most highly to be commeded and its opposite condemned. I have resolved, in order not to appear ungrateful, to emply what modest talents I possess in making restitution for what I have received.
    The prologue where he says that all earthly things should come to an end. His love should idminish and all that's left in his mind is the delectable feeling with Love reserves for those who refrain from venturing in its deepest waters. If you don't look into it, it'll die. He says that love will die; what is strong is the community that supprts him.
  28. Thus, ow that I can claim to have achieved my freedom, I intend to offer some solace, if not to those who assisted me (since their good sense or good fortune will perhaps render such a gift superfluous), at least to htose who stand in need of it.
    This is where he speaks about love being a feeling that, by nature, will die. He says that the community supports you. This book provides a resolution for what he has recived. He is "giving back." He is writing for those who need support.
  29. And who will deny that such encouragement, however small, should much rather be offered to the charming ladies than to the men?
    After Boccaccio lays out his purpose of hte book he is writing to serve as a resolution to love adn for those who need support, he addresses women, saying that women have to hide their love and a hidden love is more dangerous than one that is expressed. He says they have no escape because they are forced to conform in society. 
  30. Moreover, they are forced to follow the whims, fancies and dictates of their fathers, mothers, brothers and husbands, so that they spend most of their time cooped up within the narrow confines of their rooms, where they sit in apparent idleness, wishing one thing adn at the same time wishing its opposite and reflecting on various matters which cannot possibly always be pleasant to contemplate. 
    Prologue: He speaks of love in terms of women and how they conceal the flames of love, which makes it more dangerous than love that is expressed. 
  31. And if, in the course of their meditations, their minds should be invaded by melancholy arising out of the flames of longing, it will inevitably take root there and make them suffer greatly, unless it be dislodged by new interests. 
    Prologue: He speaks of love in terms of women and how they conceal the flames of love, which makes it more dangerous than love that is expressed. He also states that what makes it worse is teh fact that they must conform in society and take husbands. Their lives are practically determined. They need new interests and a distraction, but they cannot have it. 
  32. Besides which, their powers of endurance are consideraby weaker than those that men possess.
    Prologue: He speaks of love in terms of women and how they conceal the flames of love, which makes it more dangerous than love that is expressed. He also states that what makes it worse is teh fact that they must conform in society and take husbands. Their lives are practically determined. They need new interests and a distraction, but they cannot have it. 
  33. When men are in love, they are not affected in this way, as we can see quite plainly. They, whenever they are weighed down be melancholy or ponderous thoughts, have many ways of relieving or expelling them. For if they wish, they can always walk abroad, see and hear many things, go fowling, hunting, fishing, riding, and gambling, or attend to their business affairs. Each of these pursuits ahs the power of engaging men's minds, either wholly or in part, adn divertin them from their gloomy meditations, at least for a certain period: after which, some form f consolatioin will ensue, or the affliction will grow less intense.
    After talking about how women cannot escape their lives, he talks about love in terms of men and how they are able to escape their lives and get away from love. He is trying to "repair the omissions of Fortune" (help women escape)
  34. I intend to provide succor and diversion for the ladies, but only for those who are in love, since hte others can mkae do with their needles, their reels and tehir spindles. 
    he is using the book as a solace for women. Because they can't escape love and men can, Boccaccio wants to provide them with an escape. Prologue
  35. For they will elarn to recognize what should be avoided and likewise what should be pursued, adn these things can only lead, in my opinion to the removal of their affliction.
    He says that his tales will be an escape for women and their predetermined lives. It occurs after he mentions how women must hide their love and men don't have to
  36. The fame of his saintliness, adn of the veneration in which he was held, grew to such proportions that there was hardly anyone who did not pray for his assistance in time of trouble, and they called him, and call him still, Saint Ciappelletto. MOreover it is claimed that through him God has wrought many miracles, and that He continues to work them on behalf of whoever commends himself devoutly to this particular Saint.
    • Context: First Story of the First Day (Boccaccio)
    • It appears after Ciapelleto has died. After he speaks to the friar about his sins, lying about how he was a good man when in reality, he was very evil who would lie (false testimony) and stir up discord. During his confession, he makes it seem as if his only sins were rebuking men for their terrible ways. The friar spreads the word to everyone about how he was an amazing man, causing them to want to honor him in sainthood. They believe praying to him will help them in their lives with miracles. 
  37. It was thus, then, that Ser Cepparello of Prato lived and died, becoming a Saint in the way you have heard. Nor would I wish to deny that perhaps God has blessed and admitted him to His presence. For albeit he led a wicked, sinful life, it is possible that at the eleventh hour he was so sincerely repentant that God had mercy upon him and received him into His kingodom.
    Context: First Story of the First Day (Boccaccio)It appears after Ciapelleto has died. After he speaks to the friar about his sins, lying about how he was a good man when in reality, he was very evil who would lie (false testimony) and stir up discord. During his confession, he makes it seem as if his only sins were rebuking men for their terrible ways. The friar spreads the word to everyone about how he was an amazing man, causing them to want to honor him in sainthood. They believe praying to him will help them in their lives with miracles. 
  38. But since this is hidden from up, I speak only with regard to the outward appearance, and I say that the fellow should rather be in Hell, in the hands of the devil, than in Paradise. And if this is the case, we may recognize how very great is God's loving-kindness towards us, in that it takes account, not of our error, but of the purity of our faith, and grants our prayers even when we appoint, as our emissary one who is His enemy, thinking him to be His friend, as though we were appealing gto one who was truly holy as our intercessor for his Favor.
    Context: First Story of the First Day (Boccaccio)It appears after Ciapelleto has died. After he speaks to the friar about his sins, lying about how he was a good man when in reality, he was very evil who would lie (false testimony) and stir up discord. During his confession, he makes it seem as if his only sins were rebuking men for their terrible ways. The friar spreads the word to everyone about how he was an amazing man, causing them to want to honor him in sainthood. They believe praying to him will help them in their lives with miracles. 
  39. but her pride adn cruelty led me to such a pass that, one day, I killed myself in sheer despair with this rapier that you see in my hand, and thus I am condemned to eternal punishment. My death pleased her beyond measure, but shortly thereafter she too died, and because she had sinned by her cruelty and by gloating over my sufferings, and was quite unrepentant, being convinced that she was more of a saint than a sinner, she too was condemned to the pains of hell.
    • Context: Eighth Story of the Fifth Day (Decameron)
    • This appears in hte context of the Decammeron when Nastagio degli Onesti is wandering in the woods. He loves a woman but is not loved in return. When he walks in the woods, he first hears a woman screaming. Then, he sees a naked woman running from a knight and dogs. Although he tries to save her, the knight says to stay out of this and tells him the story of his unrequited love for the woman. He then kills the woman by stabbing her and taking out her heart, hurling it to the dogs. Nastagio sees that this is a perfect advantage to get the young lady to marry him since it happens every Friday. So, he brings them to the spot and allows them to witness it.
  40. Their marriage was by no means the only good effect to be produced by this horrible apparation, for from that day forth the ladies of Ravenna in general were so frightened by it that they became much more tractable to men's pleasures than they had ever been in the past. 
    • Context: Eighth Story of the Fifth Day
    • Last lines of the story. Nastagio marries the woman, who submits to his requests after witnessing the horror in the woods of the knight killing the woman, to escape that same faith. Furthermore, more women do this and they all live happily ever after. 
  41. Everyone being delighted with the turn that events had taken, the feasting and the merrymaking were redoubled, and continued unabated for the next few days. gualtieri was acknowledged to be very wise, though the trials to which he had subjected his lady were regarded as harsh and intolerable, whilst Griselda was accounted the wisest of them all.
    • Context: The Tenth Story of the Tenth Day
    • After Gualtieri puts Griselda through all the tests by taking away her children and later saying that he is marrying someone else, he brings in her daughter to pose as his wife adn makes Griselda serve them at the feast. When Griselda shows no hint of resentment, Gualtieri reveals what he had been doing, and honors her for her great patience and not showing resentment. He then honors her by clothing her in new clothes and letting her rejoice with her children adn rejoin him as his wife.
  42. As for Gualtieri himself, having married off his daughter to a gentleman of renown, he lived long and contentedly with Griselda, never failing to honr her to hte best of his ability.
    Context: Everyone is extremely happy for Griselda but very upset about the trials that Gualtieri put her through. They deem her the wisest.
  43. What more needs to be said, except that celestial spirits may sonetimes descend even in the houses of the poor, whilst there are those in royal palaces who would be better employed as swineherds than as rulers of men? Who else but Griselda could have endured so cheerfully the cruel and unheard of trials that gualtieri imposed upon her without shedding a tear? For perhaps it would have served him right if he had chanced upon a wife, who, being driven from the house in her shift, had found some other man to shake her skin-coat for her, earning herself a fine new dress.
    • Context: First Story of the First Day (Boccaccio)It appears after Ciapelleto has died. After he speaks to the friar about his sins, lying about how he was a good man when in reality, he was very evil who would lie (false testimony) and stir up discord. During his confession, he makes it seem as if his only sins were rebuking men for their terrible ways. The friar spreads the word to everyone about how he was an amazing man, causing them to want to honor him in sainthood. They believe praying to him will help them in their lives with miracles. Everyone is extremely happy for Griselda but very upset about the trials that Gualtieri put her through. They deem her the wisest. 
    • Last lines of the story, where they question celestial spirits being better in the house of the poor rather than hte rich (some people don't desreve inflated position)
    • Also, a shift in the view of woman, who they said Griselda should have found another man.
  44. As a matter of fact, the two ladies I've mentioned, along with other people at the court, made up their minds to do the same as Boccaccio. There was to be one difference--that they should not write any story that was not truthful.
    Parlamente says this as they look for a pastime to occupy themselves.
  45. At each strand or stream where the stalwart passed
    Twere a marvel if he met not some monstrous foe 
    And that so fierce and forbidding that fight he must
    So many were the wonders he wandered among
    That to tell but the tenth part would tax my wits
    Now with serpents he wars, now with savage wolves,
    Now with wild men of the woods, that watched from the rocks
    Both with bulls and with bears, and with boars besides
    And giants that came gibbering from the jagged steeps
    Had he not borne himself bravely, and been on God's side,
    He had met with many mishaps and mortal harms
    This appears after Gawain sets out on his journey. It recounts how hard hte journey will be. Gawain does not want to do. He is lonely, has no mate but his horse. he constantly asks people if he ever heard of the knight, but tehy say no. He must change courses until finding the Chapel
  46. "By God" said Gawain then, 
    "I shall not give way to weeping;
    God's will be done, amen!
    I commend me to His keeping."
    This appears after Gawain is being guided to the Chapel of the knight and his guide implores him to go by some other route--basically, to run away because the Green Knight is very dangerous. He tells him he won't tell anyone, but Gawain is reluctant. Of course, by this time, he has the girdle
  47. "Accursed be a cowardly and covetous heart!
    In you is villainy and vice, and virtue laid low!"
    this occurs after the Green Knight reveals himself to be the Lord. He tells him that he knows of the girdle, which is his, and he employed his wife to do all of that. Gawaiin is upset at his failure.
  48. His mind was made up. He would love her.
    Amador when he first lays eyes on Florida. He was amazed at her grace adnd beauty adn wanted her to look with favor upon him. That would give him more happiness htan anything.
  49. I am rather afraid that there is some evil intent hidden away underneath all these fine words, and that you're trying to beguile me because I'm young and innocent. It makes me very uncertain as to how I should reply to you. 
    This appears after Amador confesses his love for her. He tells her that he consecrated himself to her service when he first laid eyes on her. He married her best friend to get to her, but he wants no favor, nor pleasure. All he wants is that she'll never cast him away.
  50. At these words Florida was filled with delight beyond bounds. Beep within her heart she began to feel stirrings that she had never felt before. 
    After Amador confesses his love for her, he says that he is so happy with the love she has already shown that he desires nothing else. Florida says that hshe placed more trust in him than in any other man. He says he'll remain always by her.
  51. "Madame," replied Saffredent, "when our ladies are holding court and sit in state like judges, then we men bend our knees before them, we timidly invite them to dance, we serve them so devlotedy that we anticipate their every wish. Indeed, we have the appearance of being so terrified of offending them, so anxious to serve their every whim, that anybody else observing us would think we must be either out of our minds, or struck dumb, so idiotic is our animal- like devotion.:
    • Heptameron
    • After Saffredent tells his story and says that he honors Amador, Parlamente and Hircan have a bit of a debate about the behavior of Florida, where Hircan says that screaming is the least resistence a woman could offer. He says that he applauds Amador for partly fulfilling his duty. Oisille asks what duty and this is what Saffredent replies.
  52. Then allt he credit goes to teh ladies because they put on such haughty expressions and adopt such refined ways of speaking, that people who see nothing but their external appearance go in awe of them, and feel obliged to admire and love them. However, in private it is quite another matter. Then Love is the only judge of the way we bejave, and we soon find out that they are just women, and we are just men. The title 'lady' is soon exchanged for 'mistress.' and her 'devoted servant' soon becomes her 'lover.' HEnce the well-known proverb: 'loyal service makes the servant master.'
    HeptameronAfter Saffredent tells his story and says that he honors Amador, Parlamente and Hircan have a bit of a debate about the behavior of Florida, where Hircan says that screaming is the least resistence a woman could offer. He says that he applauds Amador for partly fulfilling his duty. Oisille asks what duty and this is what Saffredent replies.
  53. They have honor, just as men, who can give it to them or take it away, have honor; and they see the things we patiently endure; but it is therefore only right that our long-suffering should be rewarded when honor cannot be injured.
    • HeptameronAfter Saffredent tells his story and says that he honors Amador, Parlamente and Hircan have a bit of a debate about the behavior of Florida, where Hircan says that screaming is the least resistence a woman could offer. He says that he applauds Amador for partly fulfilling his duty. Oisille asks what duty and Saffredent replies that men serve ladies, giving off the appearance of being scared of offending them. Then all the credit goes to the ladies. Love, he says, is the only judge of hte way they all behave. Oisille replies this. 
    • Oisille
  54. "I do not know what barbarians these are" (for so the Greeks called all foreign nations), "but the formation of this army that I see is not at all barbarous."
    • Opening lines of Michel de Montaigne's Essay of Cannibals
    • He says that King Pyrrhus says this as he passes into Italy and saw the fomration of the army of the Romans. Because he is from Greece, he considers them barbarous. They were only going to meet him.
  55. But rivers are subject to change
    Montaigne describes movements and talks about the Dordogne River and how it so frequently changed, stealing away the foundations of several buildings and how much of a disturbance it is
  56. And sailing a long time, at last discovered a great fertile island, all clothed in woods and watered by great deep rivers, far remote from any mainland
    • Michel de Montaigne, Of Cannibals
    • This appears in the context that Montaigne speaks about antiquity, especially through the discovery in Aristotle. He talks about how Aristotle relates taht certain Carthaginians began to settle on hte great fertile island, bringing their families with them. After this, he adds that hte lords of Cathage forbade anyone from going to this place because they were experiencing depopulation
  57. Each man calls barbarism whatever is not his own practice
    • Montaigne, Of Cannibals
    • Context: Montaigne says that there is actually nothing barbarous in that nation. BEcause we only have developed truths and reason and opinions from the country we live in, we are close-minded to anything new and regard it as barbarous
  58. For clever peopel observe more htings and more curiously, but they interpret htem
    • Montaigne, Of Cannibals
    • Context: Montaigne speaks of a man he met who was simple and crude--a character fit to bear true witness. He then contrasts this man with the clever man, who never shows you things as they are, but bends and disguises them according to their way of seeing it nad judging it based on that. They also add something to their matter. This brings about his statement about needing a very honest man, which was the man he met
  59. This is a nation, I should say to Plato, in which there is no sort of traffic, no knowledge of letters, no science of numbers, no name for a magistrate or for political superiority, no custom of servitude, no riches or poverty, no contracts, no successions, no partitions, no occupations, but leisure ones, no care forany but common kinship, no clothes, no agriculture, no metal, no use of wine or wheat
    • Montaigne, Of Cannibals
    • Context: Montaigne is describing hte nations he encounters and describes that the only way they are barbarous to him is that they have been fashioned very little by the human mind, and are more natural. The laws of nature still rule them. HTey are not corrupted, but pure. They surpass all the pictures in which poets have idealized the gold age and inventions and conceptions and desire of philosophy
  60. After that, someone asked their opinion, and wanted to know what they had found most amazing. They mentioned three things, of which I have forgotten the third, and I am very sorry for it; but I still remember two of them. They said that in the first place they thought it very strange that so many grown men, bearded, strong, and armed, who were around the king (it is likely htat they wre talking about hte Swiss of his guard) should submit to obey a child and that one of htem was not chosen to command instead. Second (they have a way in their language of speaking of men as halves of one another), they had noticed that there were among us men full and gorged with all sorts of good things and their their other halves were beggars at their doors, emaciated with hunger and poverty; and they thought it strange that these needy halves could endure such an injustice, and did not take the others by the throuat, or set fire to their houses
    • Montaigne, Of Cannibals
    • Context: He speaks about three men ignorant of their ruin, which will come about by their being tricked by desire for new things. The king talked to these men fro a long time adn tehy were asked their opinion to which they repied this. 
  61. All this is not too bad--but what's the use? They don't wear breeches.
    • Montaigne, Of Cannibals
    • Context: Very last line that serves to say, "Well, we only consider people who wear clothes civilized, despite their complete superiority over us. They are not barbarous, but since they aren't like us, we consider them to be"
  62. methins he hath no drowning mark upon him; his complexion is perfect gallows. Stand fast, good Fate, to his hanging! Make the rope of his destiny our cable, for our own doth little advantage. If he be nt born to be hanged, our case is miserable.
    • Shakespeare, The Tempest
    • Opening scene of hte Tempest. The men, Antonio, Gonzalo, Sebastian, etc. are in the boatswain's way and he's being very rude to them, saying that just because they are important on land, they are of no use to him there. 
  63. those being all my study, Hte government I cast upon my brother And to my state grew stranger, being transported and rapt in secret studies
    • Shakespeare, the tempest
    • he's telling Miranda how they came on that island adn how he used to be Duke of Milan until he was replaced very violently by his brother
  64. I fear, forever. Milan and Naples have moe widows in them of this business' making than we bring men to comfort them: The fault's your own.
    • Shakespeare, the tempest
    • Said by Sebastian in relation to King Alonso's daughter, Claribel, who married an African King of Tunis. He likens her to Dido in a negative sort of way. 
  65. Yet he would be king on't.
    The latter end of his commonwealth forgets the beginning. 
    • Shakespeare, The Tempest
    • Said by Sebastian and Antonio. Gonzalo is talking about his ideal society where there will be no rulers or any negative things, such as riches. However, he contradicts himself by saying he will be king of it. Sebastian and Antonio mock him for it.
  66. Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. 
    • Shakespeare, the Tempest
    • Trinculo says this when he comes to the area where Caliban is sleeping adn hididng, thinking that Trinculo is a spirit and that he will be punished for bringing hte wood late. 
  67. Travelers never did lie, though fools at home condemn 'em.
    • Shakespeare, the Tempest
    • Antonio says this after they see the banquet and dancing scene. They are amazed and begin to believe the unbelievable, such as Sebastian saying he believes there are unicorns. Antonio concurs with this line.
  68. You and your ways; whose wraths to guard you from, Which here, in this most desolate isle, else falls upon your heads, is nothing but heart's sorrow and a clear life ensuing.
    Ariels ays this after the banquet vanishses and he chastises them, calling them three men of sin. THey draw their sword, but he says it can do nothing for them. He then tells them of Prospero and what they did to him and how he wants their repentence now. 
  69. All three of them are desperate; their great guilt, Like poison given to work a great time after, Now 'gins to bite the spirits.
    Gonzalo; he does not see what Arial says and is confused, thinking it is just guilt that eats away at hte men. He asks the king why he looks so strange.
  70. The cloud capped tow'rs, the gorgeous palaces, the solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yes, all which it inherit, shall dssolve, And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, leave not a rack behind.
    • Shakespeare, the Tempest
    • Prospero utters this after hte marriage of Ferdinant and Miranda, who notice him in a distraught state during a happy time. It is because he remembers Caliban's conspiracy against him and must go. But, he tells them this.
  71. We are such stuff as dreams are made on.
    • Shakespeare, the Tempest
    • Prospero utters this after hte marriage of Ferdinant and Miranda, who notice him in a distraught state during a happy time. It is because he remembers Caliban's conspiracy against him and must go. But, he tells them this.
  72. The rarer action is in virtue than in vengeance. They being penitent, the sole drift of my purpose doth extend not a frown further.
    • Shakespeare, the tempest
    • Prospero says this to Ariel after he tells him that thy are all sad and distracted. Gonzalo, too, is crying. He says that his charms worked and he should become tender. Ariel expresses that if he were human, he would pity them and Prospero tells him that he does and all he wants is their repentence.
  73. But htis rough magic I hear abjure; and when I have required some heavenly music (which even now I do) to work mine end upon their senses that this airy charm is for, I'll break my staff, Bury it certain fathoms in the earth, and deeper than did ever plummet sound I'll drown my book.
    • Shakespeare, the Tempest
    • Prospero says this after he's done all his magic on the island. For example, the banquet scene has already occurred, Ferdinand and Miranda are already married. The three contrivers are discovered. He makes makes a circle to which the men stand in it charmed.

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