Terms

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Author:
jonbenne
ID:
185207
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Terms
Updated:
2012-11-24 19:17:53
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Commercial Key words
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  1. Absolute Altitude
    actual distance between an aircraft and the terrain over which is flying. AGL
  2. Accerlerate-stop distance
  3. The distance required to accelerate
    to V1 with all engines at takeoff power, experience an enginefailure at V1, and abort the takeoff and bring the airplane toa stop using braking action only (use of thrust reversing isnot considered). 
  4. Adiabatic Cooling
  5. A process of cooling the air through
    • expansion. For example, as air moves up slope it expands
    • with the reduction of atmospheric pressure and cools as it
    • expands. 
  6. Advection fog
  7. A process of cooling the air through
    • expansion. For example, as air moves up slope it expands
    • with the reduction of atmospheric pressure and cools as it
    • expands. 
  8. Adiabatic Heating
  9. A process of heating dry air through
    • compression. For example, as air moves down a slope it is
    • compressed, which results in an increase in temperature. 
  10. A process of cooling the air through
    • expansion. For example, as air moves up slope it expands
    • with the reduction of atmospheric pressure and cools as it
    • expands. 
  11. Aerodynamics
    A process of heating dry air throughcompression. For example, as air moves down a slope it iscompressed, which results in an increase in temperature. 
  12. AIRMET
    Inflight weather advisory issued as an amendment to the area forecast, concerning weather phenomena of operational interest to all aircraft and that is potentiallyhazardous to aircraft with limited capability due to lack ofequipment, instrumentation, or pilot qualifications. 
  13. Constant Speed propeller
    A controllable-pitch propellerwhose pitch is automatically varied in flight by a governorto maintain a constant rpm in spite of varying air loads. 
  14. Continuous flow oxygen system.  
  15. System that supplies
    • a constant supply of pure oxygen to a rebreather bag that
    • dilutes the pure oxygen with exhaled gases and thus supplies a
    • healthy mix of oxygen and ambient air to the mask. Primarily
    • used in passenger cabins of commercial airliners. 
  16. Controllability. 
    A measure of the response of an aircraftrelative to the pilot’s flight control inputs. 
  17. Controlled Airspace
  18. An airspace of defined dimensions
    • within which A TC service is provided to IFR and VFR flights
    • in accordance with the airspace classification. It includes
    • Class A, Class B, Class C, Class D, and Class E airspace. 
  19. Control pressures 
  20. The amount of physical exertion on the
    control column necessary to achieve the desired attitude. 
  21. Convective Weather
  22. Unstable, rising air found in
    cumiliform clouds. 
  23. Convective SIGMET 
    Weather advisory concerning convective weather significant to the safety of all aircraft,including thunderstorms, hail, and tornadoes. 
  24. Corrdinated Flight
  25. Flight with a minimum disturbance of
    • the forces maintaining equilibrium, established via effective
    • control use. 
  26.  

    Coriolis illusion. 
  27. The illusion of rotation or movement in an
    • entirely different axis, caused by an abrupt head movement,
    • while in a prolonged constant-rate turn that has ceased to
    • stimulate the brain’s motion sensing system. 
  28. Coupled ailerons and rudder 
  29. Rudder and ailerons are
    • connected with interconnected springs in order to counteract
    • adverse yaw. Can be overridden if it becomes necessary to
    • slip the aircraft. 
  30. Course
  31. The intended direction of flight in the horizontal
    plane measured in degrees from north. 
  32. Crew resource management  
  33. The application of
    • team management concepts in the flight deck environment.
    • It was initially known as cockpit resource management,
    • but as CRM programs evolved to include cabin crews,
    • maintenance personnel, and others, the phrase “crew
    • resource management” was adopted. This includes single
    • pilots, as in most general aviation aircraft. Pilots of small
    • aircraft, as well as crews of larger aircraft, must make
    • effective use of all available resources; human resources,
    • hardware, and information. A current definition includes
    • all groups routinely working with the flight crew who
    • are involved in decisions required to operate a flight
    • safely. These groups include, but are not limited to pilots,
    • dispatchers, cabin crewmembers, maintenance personnel,
    • and air traffic controllers. CRM is one way of addressing
    • the challenge of optimizing the human/machine interface
    • and accompanying interpersonal activities. 

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