Dendro Week 9

Card Set Information

Author:
Dorky48
ID:
185624
Filename:
Dendro Week 9
Updated:
2012-11-27 11:27:08
Tags:
Anacardiaceae Similaceace
Folders:

Description:
Anacardiaceae-Similaceace
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user Dorky48 on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. Monadelphous
    • stamens that have their filaments united in single group around the pistil 
    • Meliaceae
  2. Hesperidium
    a partitioned berry with a leathery, removable rind; e.g., Rutaceae
  3. Schizocarp
    • a dry dehiscent fruit that at maturity splits into two or more parts each with a
    • single seed; e.g., Araliaceae
  4. Infructescence
    the arrangement of fruits on a branch system; e.g: Aralia spinosa
  5. Genus and Species?
    sparsely-branched large shrub/small tree, eastern U.S. (including throughout
    NJ, even Pine Barrens), mostly wet/moist woods, swamps; not that common;
    leaves-
    pinnately
    compound, 7-13 entire leaflets; *petiole, rachis and petiolules
    usually reddish*, fall color orange to scarlet; *fruit-
    ivory-white in open, pendent panicles*; twigs-
    stout, yellowish brown, and usually mottled
    • Vernix
    • Toxicodendron
    • Anacardiaeae

    Poision Sumacs!
  6. Genus and species?
    poison-oak:
    leaflets more conspicuously 3-7-lobed and pubescent than above; a suberect,
    sparingly-branched shrub, rarely reaching 3’,
    never climbs or forms aerial rootlets; dry woodlands in SE; uncommon; in dry,
    sandy woods in NJ on Coastal Plain, rarely in the Pine Barrens
    • Pubenscens
    • Toxicodendron
    • Anacardiaceae
    • (posion oak)
  7. Genus and Species? 
    deciduous
    vine or small shrub, trifolialate
    leaves,
    turn red in fall; yellowish-white
    fruit;
    twigs
    brownish, conspicuous lenticils
    • Radicans
    • Toxicodendron
    • Anacardiaceae
  8. Family?

    Habit:
    Trees, shrubs

    Leaves:
    Alternate, pinnately
    compound, unifoliolate,
    or simple, stipulate or estipulate

    Flowers:
    small, in large panicles, regular, 3- to 8-parted; pistils 2 to 5 separate,
    ovaries superior; plants dioecious
    or polygmous;
    entomophilous
    or ornithophilous

    Fruit:
    a capsule, drupe, berry or samara
    • Simaroubaceae (Bitterwood family)
    • Used commerically in insecticides and medicenes
  9. Genus and Species?

    Leaves:
    deciduous, alternate, pinnately
    compound, 1-2’, 13-25+ ovate-lanceolate
    leaflets w/unequal or subcordate
    bases, entire margins except for 1-5 rounded, basal teeth, each with a
    prominent dark green gland beneath near the tooth apex

    Flowers:
    small, yellowish, in large, terminal panicles, late spring/summer, trees
    usually dioecious

    Fruit:
    oblong, twisted samara, seed cavity in center

    Naturalized throughout temperate N. America
    • altissima
    • Ailanthus
    • Simaroubaceae
  10. Habit:
    Trees, shrubs

    Leaves:
    Deciduous or persistent; alternate; simple, unifoliolate,
    pinnately
    or bipinnately
    compound, leaflets often oblique; estipulate

    Flowers:
    perfect or imperfect, regular, 4 to 5-parted, stamens 8 to 10 monadelphous;
    pistil 1, superior; entomophilous

    Fruit:
    a capsule or drupe

    Fine cabinet and furniture woods
    Meliaceae (Mahogony Family)
  11. Name a plant in the Meliaceae Family
    Chinaberry
  12. Family?
    Leaves:
    Deciduous or persistent; alternate or some opposite, mostly compound or unifoliolate,
    with glandular-punctate dots, estipulate, aromatic with lemon-like odor when
    crushed

    Flowers:
    usually regular, white or greenish, bixexual
    or unisexual, 4 to 5-parted, stamens 8 to 10, pistil 1, superior; entomophilous

    Fruit:
    a drupe, follicle, samara, or hesperidium; pulp in citrus fruit derived from
    enlarged hairs

    Bittertasting, aromatic volatile oil
    Horticulturally important
    Rutaceae (Rue Family)
  13. Genus and Species?
    Habit:
    Usually tall shrub (5-15’) can be small tree (30-40’);
    all parts bitter and aromatic; purported to have medicinal qualities
    (toothache, rheumatism, ulcers, colic); yellowish-brown wood, hence generic
    name

    Leaves:
    Altn.,
    pinnately
    comp., tardily deciduous or evergreen; 6-8”,
    with 5-11 leaflets, 1.5-2.5”in
    length, ovate to oval; lustrous to waxy-shiny dark green above, lighter,
    pubescent below; petiole prickly below, rachis sometimes w/prickles at node;
    fall: scarlet and yellow-tinged

    Flowers:
    dioecious;
    small, yellowish-green, many-branched racemes borne before the leaves
    (April/May) from axils of previous year’s
    growth

    Fruit:
    small, fleshy follicle produced in clusters; black, surface-pitted, 2-valved, dihescent;
    enclosing shiny, reddish-brown to black seed, sometimes hanging from fruit by a
    thread; July to Sept.

    Twig:
    stout; green, turning gray-green; sharp, scattered single spines; shield-shaped
    leaf scars; rounded green to rusty red or brown, hairy terminal bud

    Bark:
    unique gray-brown, smooth w/large, spine-tipped corky pyrimidal
    projections, losing spines w/age
    • Americana
    • Zanthozylum
    • Rutaceae

    Common Prickly Ash
  14. Genus and Species?

    Habit:
    small, aromatic tree to 20’
    and 6” dia.; widespread, divided into
    several subspecies and varieties

    Leaves:
    deciduous, palmately
    trifoliolate,
    4 to 7”, leaflets 2-4”,
    ¼-2” wide, ovate, acuminate, entire or serrulate,
    small punctate dots

    Flowers:
    greenish-white terminal panicles appearing with leaves, foul-smelling, carrion
    flies pollinate

    Fruit:
    7/8” dia. yellow-brown round,
    wafer-like samara in drooping clusters
    • trifoliata
    • Ptelea
    • Rutaceae
    • Common hoptree
  15. Family? 
    Leaves:
    alternate, rarely opposite or whorled, simple or pinnately
    or palmately
    compound and often very large; with and without stipules

    Flowers:
    perfect or imperfect, in a head, umbel, or panicle; 5-parted, ovary inferior; entomophilous

    Fruit:
    a berry, drupe or schizocarp

    herbs, shrubs, trees and woody vines, widely distributed in temperate and tropical regions

    Ornamental and medicinal importance
    Araliaceae (Ginseng family)
  16. Genus and Species?
    Habit:
    shrub, small tree to 30’, 8”dia.;
    trunk unbranched
    or few branches w/straight, slender, sharp prickles; large, compound leaves
    clustered near top; New England to FL, TX to WI, Ontario

    Leaves:
    alternate, mostly bipinnate
    (3x), 24-60”; many ovate, serrulate
    leaflets 1 ¼-4”, often with prickles beneath along
    midrib

    Flowers:
    small, white, in large terminal panicles to 40”,
    late summer

    Fruit:
    ¼” dia. purplish-black berry, red
    pedicels, infructescence
    branches, persisting into winter
    • Spinosa
    • Aralia
    • Araliaceae

    Prickly ash
  17. What genus and species is super important in the Araliaceae family?
    Araliaceae Panax quinquefolius (ginseng)
  18. 2 genrea used for timbnrer and one cultivated in the Mediterrranian basin
    Oleaceae (the Olive Family)
  19. Genus?
    Interspecific hybridization does occur

    Leaves:
    deciduous, opposite, odd-pinnately
    compound, leaflets serrate or entire

    Flowers:
    perfect and/or imperfect, appearing in early spring before or with leaves;
    calyx 4-lobed or lacking, corolla usually lacking; stamens 2-4, pistils 1; anemophilous

    Fruit:
    a 1-seeded samara w/an elongated wing; seed narrow, elongated

    Twig:
    slender to stout, glabrous to pubescent, terete
    between nodes; terminal buds 1-3 pairs of scales; laterals smaller; leaf scars suborbicular
    to semicircular, sometimes with upper edge notched; bundle scars numerous in an
    open ‘u’-
    or ‘v’-shaped
    line
    • Fraxinus
    • Oleaceae

    White Ash
  20. Family?

    Habit:
    arboresent,
    medium-sized trees;

    Leaves:
    large, deciduous, usually opposite, rarely in whorls of 3; estipulate; entire
    to dentate; underside pubescent

    Flowers:
    in large, terminal cymes; bilaterally symmetric; tubular corolla

    Fruits:
    dehiscent capsules, seed small, brown, ellipsoid with winged margins, either
    brown or clear

    Wood highly valued in Japan
    Paulowniaceae
  21. Family?
    Economic and medicinal importance
    Mostly herbs, some shrubs and few trees, mainly temperate
    Used to contain Pauulownia
    Scrophulariaceae (figwort family)
  22. Genus and Species?

    Habit:
    medium-sized tree, 50-60’, to 24”
    dia.

    Leaves:
    large, deciduous, opposite, heart-shaped; lower surface pubescent; soft to
    touch

    Flowers:
    long, tubular with 5 unequal lobes, pale violet and fragrant, in erect
    panicles, early spring before leaves

    Fruit:
    ovoid, dehiscent, 2-valved capsule w/small winged seeds; sticky, greenish,
    turns dark brown/black and persists through winter

    Vegetatively/superficially
    resembles catalpa
    • tomentose
    • Paulownia
    • Paulowniaceae
  23. Family? 

    Leaves:
    mostly deciduous, opposite or whorled, rarely alternate, simple or compound,
    estipulate

    Flowers:
    perfect, usually large and showy, tubular, zygomorphic, 5-parted, ovary
    superior; entomophilous
    and ornithophilous

    Fruit:
    a capsule, or rarely berry-like, seeds usually winged

    used ornamentally; fish bait, decay-resistant wood for fence posts, ties
    Bignoniaceae (the trumpet-creeper family)
  24. Genus?

    Habit:
    small- to medium-sized tree, 50-60’,
    to 24” dia.

    Leaves:
    large, deciduous, opposite or whorled in threes, simple, long-petioled,  heart-shaped, sometimes palmately
    lobed, pubescent below

    Flowers:
    long and showy in many-flowered panicles or corymbs; corolla tubular, 2-lipped;
    white, w/two yellow-orange stripes and purple to purple-brown spots and stripes
    in throat, lobe; appearing after the leaves

    Fruit:
    long, slender, terete,
    pendent, persistent, capsule, w/many flat, 2-winged seeds, fringed or tufted at
    ends of opposing wings
    • Catalpa
    • Bignoniaceae
  25. Family?
    Habit:
    mostly trees and shrubs; vines and herbs

    Leaves:
    nearly always opposite and decussate, or whorled; petiolate
    to sessile; gland-dotted or not; entire or serrate

    Flowers:
    small to medium, mostly 4- or 5-parted, borne mostly in cymes, panicles, heads

    Fruit:
    fleshy or non-fleshy, dehiscent or indehiscent, achene, nutlet,
    drupelets, or a capsule, berry or drupe; seeds rarely winged
    Rubiaceae (coffee or madder family)
  26. Genus and Species?

    Habit:
    small shrub to 15’, densely-branched

    Leaves:
    opposite or in whorls of 3, oblong, entire, shiny bright to dark green, veins
    lighter on underside, reddish petiole

    Flowers:
    perfect, white, tubular, in dense globose
    heads at ends of branches in groups of 3-4; fragrant; mid- to late-summer

    Fruit:
    dense heads of small, angular, reddish-brown nutlets,
    persisting through winter

    Stems:
    twigs roundish, glossy reddish to olive, or dull gray-brown; often corky
    lenticels; terminal buds lacking; mature stems, gray-brown, shaggy and
    exfoliating
    • Occidentalis
    • Cephalanthus
    • Rubiaceae

    Buttonbush
  27. Family?
    Habit:
    Most shrubs and small trees, vines, rarely herbs

    Leaves:
    evergreen or deciduous, usually opposite, or whorled, petiolate,
    simple, lamina dissected or entire; stipulate or estipulate

    Flowers:
    Irregular, slightly zygomorphic, usually bracteolate, fragrant; solitary,
    axillary, or aggregated in cymes, spikes or heads, terminal or axillary; polygamomonoecious;
    entomophilous
    and ornithophilous

    Fruit:
    fleshy or non-fleshy, dehiscent, indehiscent; capsule, or achene-like, berry,
    or drupe
    Caprifoliaceae (Honeysuckle Family)
  28. What are the Monocot families?
    • Poaceae
    • Agavaceae
    • Smilacaceae
    • Arecaceae
  29. Liliopsida?
    Monocots
  30. What defines monocots?
    -One cotyledon

    • _
    • Mostly parallel leaf venation

    • _
    • Flower parts typically in 3’s,
    • seldom in 4’s, rarely in 5’s

    • _
    • Vascular bundles scattered throughout the stem
  31. Family?

    Evergreen
    trees, shrubs and woody vines

    Palms
    usually unbranched
    trunks, formed only by primary growth w/many scattered vascular bundles;
    therefore no true wood or bark

    Palm
    family one of three most important, w/legumes and grasses: shelter,
    construction materials, furniture, food, fiber, wax and oil
    Arecaceae (The palm family)
  32. Family?

    Leaves:
    persistent, alternate, often quite large, forming dense terminal rosettes,
    long-petiolate
    w/broad to tubular sheath that often splits into either pinnate, palmate, or
    somewhat intermediate costa-palmate, or bipinnate
    forms; petiole may or may not be prickly

    Flowers:
    small, fragrant, perfect or imperfect, regular, perianth
    3- to 6-parted; panicle enclosed at first by large spathe;
    entomophilous,
    rarely anemophilous

    Fruit:
    a fleshy or fibrous drupe, usually 1-seeded
    Arecaceae (The palm family)
  33. Family?
    perennial,
    tree size (to 100’, 12”dia),
    ‘woody’,
    but without secondary growth; stems
    hollow in the internodes and green, yellow, brown, black or red; leaves:
    alternate, sheathing at the base, flat, long, strap-like blades, mostly
    distichous, often narrowed and jointed between the blade and sheath, deciduous
    from this point; flowers:
    lacking a perianth,
    inconspicuous, but enclosed in bracts forming a conspicuous spikelet, which
    forms a larger secondary inflorescence; anemophilous;
    fruit:
    a grain with a single seed
    • Poaceae (Grass Family)
    • Contains the bamboos
  34. Family?

    Uses:
    papermaking, handicrafts, engineering, pipes, construction, walking sticks,
    furniture, flooring, fishing poles, tools, mats, baskets, food (edible young
    shoots); food, shelter for wildlife

    9
    genera cultivated in U.S. for ornamentals

    Two
    types: ‘clumping’
    and ‘running’;
    the latter can spread rapidly by rhizomes and can be difficult to contain  
    • Poaceae (Grass family )
    • Contains the bamboos
  35. Family?
    Short-stemmed
    herbs w/basal rosette or sparsely and irregularly branched trees with terminal
    rosettes; leaves often stiff and succulent

    Leaves:
    alternate, forming a close spiral, simple, basal or apical in rosettes,
    sheathing, usually fibrous, often succulent, stiff and sharp-pointed, narrow,
    tapered and dagger- or sword-like, entire or prickly margined

    Flowers:
    perfect or imperfect, plants dioecious, mostly regular, 3-parted, ovary
    superior or inferior; inflorescence usually a panicle; entomophilous,
    ornithophilous
    and/or bats

    Fruit:
    a capsule or berry
    Agavaceae (the Century Plant family)
  36. Family?
    Habit:
    shrubs, vines, herbs; perennial, rhizomatous or tuberous; tendrils from petiole
    bases

    Leaves:
    simple, evergreen, mostly alternate, or opposite; usually leathery; petiolate;
    rarely sheathing, may be fetid or not; entire, lanceolate
    or ovate; one-veined or palmately
    veined
    Flower:
    solitary or in cymes, racemes, spikes or umbels; regular, 3-parted; plants dioecious;
    entomophilous

    Fruit:
    fleshy, usually 3-seeded berry
    Smilacaceae ( The Catbrier Family)

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview