Quotes cont.

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Anonymous
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188292
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Quotes cont.
Updated:
2012-12-09 21:58:20
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English Final
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  1. O you who hear within these scattered verses
    the sound of sighs with which I fed my heart
    in my first errant youthful days when I 
    in part was not the man I am today;
    • Sonnet 1 by Francis Petrarch:
    • It's the poem in which he addresses the reader about his trials with love in his youth when he was foolish, not wise as he is todady. He wants them to pity him and forgive him for his past love since he's so embarrassed and ashamed. Yet, he's putting it out there for all to read. 
  2. for all the ways in which I weep and speak
    between vain hopes, between vain suffering, 
    in anyone who knows love through its trials,
    in them, may I find pity and forgiveness
    • Sonnet 1 by Francis Petrarch:
    • It's the poem in which he addresses the reader about his trials with love in his youth when he was foolish, not wise as he is todady. He wants them to pity him and forgive him for his past love since he's so embarrassed and ashamed. Yet, he's putting it out there for all to read. 
  3. But now I see how I've become the talk
    so long a time of people all around
    (it often makes me feel so full of shame),
    Sonnet 1 by Francis Petrarch:It's the poem in which he addresses the reader about his trials with love in his youth when he was foolish, not wise as he is todady. He wants them to pity him and forgive him for his past love since he's so embarrassed and ashamed. Yet, he's putting it out there for all to read. 
  4. and from my vanities there comes shame's fruit, 
    and my repentance, and the clear awareness
    that worldly joy is just a fleeting dream.
    • Sonnet 1 by Francis Petrarch:
    • It's the poem in which he addresses the reader about his trials with love in his youth when he was foolish, not wise as he is todady. He wants them to pity him and forgive him for his past love since he's so embarrassed and ashamed. Yet, he's putting it out there for all to read. 
  5. It was the day the sun's ray had turned pale 
    with pity for the suffering of his Maker
    when I was caught (and I put up no fight), 
    my lady, for your lovely eyes had bound me. 
    • Sonnet 3 by Francis Petrarch:
    • The poem that talkes about how Petrarch fell in love with a woman, most likely Laura, on the day of Good Friday, when he was in church, when he should have been paying attention. His actions are inappropriate.At the end, he blames it all on Cupid. 
  6. It seemed no time to be on guard against
    Love's blows; therefore, I went my way
    secure and fearless--so, all my misfortunes 
    began in midst of universal woe.
    Sonnet 3 by Francis Petrarch:The poem that talkes about how Petrarch fell in love with a woman, most likely Laura, on the day of Good Friday, when he was in church, when he should have been paying attention. His actions are inappropriate.At the end, he blames it all on Cupid. 
  7. Love found me all disarmed and saw the way
    was clear to reach my heart down through the eyes,
    which have become the halls and doors of tears.
    Sonnet 3 by Francis Petrarch:The poem that talkes about how Petrarch fell in love with a woman, most likely Laura, on the day of Good Friday, when he was in church, when he should have been paying attention. His actions are inappropriate.At the end, he blames it all on Cupid. 
  8. It seems to me it did him little honor 
    to womnd me with his arrow in my state
    and to you, armed, not show his bow at all.
    Sonnet 3 by Francis Petrarch:The poem that talkes about how Petrarch fell in love with a woman, most likely Laura, on the day of Good Friday, when he was in church, when he should have been paying attention. His actions are inappropriate.At the end, he blames it all on Cupid. 
  9. Blest be the day, and blest the month and year
    SEason and hour and very moment blest,
    The lovely land and place where first possessed
    By two pure eyes I found me prisoner; 
    • Sonnet 61 by Francis Petrarch:
    • A man regards a woman as the same level as God. He defers the blame in this sonnet on his being held prisoner by her love. He honors her and and only wants to honor her. 
  10. And blest the first sweet pain, the first most dear, 
    Which burnt my heart when Lvoe came in as guest;
    And blest the bow, the shafts which shoook my breast,
    And even the wonds which Love delivered there. 
    Sonnet 61 by Francis Petrarch:A man regards a woman as the same level as God. He defers the blame in this sonnet on his being held prisoner by her love. He honors her and and only wants to honor her. 
  11. Blest be the words and voices which filled grove 
    And glen with echoes of my lady's name;
    The sighs, the tears, the fierce despair of love;
    Sonnet 61 by Francis Petrarch:A man regards a woman as the same level as God. He defers the blame in this sonnet on his being held prisoner by her love. He honors her and and only wants to honor her. 
  12. And blest the sonnet-sources of my fame; 
    And blest that thought of thoughts which is her own,
    Of her, her only, of herself alone
    Sonnet 61 by Francis Petrarch:A man regards a woman as the same level as God. He defers the blame in this sonnet on his being held prisoner by her love. He honors her and and only wants to honor her. 
  13. Father in heaven, after each lost day, 
    Each night spent raving with that fierce desire
    Which in my heart has kindled into fire
    Seeing your acts adorned for my dismay;
    • Sonnet 62 by Francis Petrarch:
    • This poem directly succeeds Sonnet 61. After practically making Laura a god in 61, this poem represents repentence in sonnet 62. He takes responsibility for his actions and wants to turn to God. He wants God to take pity on him.
  14. Grant henceforth that I turn, within your light
    To another life and deeds more truly fair,
    So having spread to no avail the snare
    My bitter foe might hold it in despite
    Sonnet 62 by Francis Petrarch:This poem directly succeeds Sonnet 61. After practically making Laura a god in 61, this poem represents repentence in sonnet 62. He takes responsibility for his actions and wants to turn to God. He wants God to take pity on him.
  15. The eleventh year, my Lord, has now come round
    Since I was yoked beneath the heavy trace 
    That on the meekest weighs most cruelly
    Sonnet 62 by Francis Petrarch:This poem directly succeeds Sonnet 61. After practically making Laura a god in 61, this poem represents repentence in sonnet 62. He takes responsibility for his actions and wants to turn to God. He wants God to take pity on him.
  16. Pity the abject plight where I am found;
    Return my straying thoughts to a nobler place;
    Show them this day you were on Calvary.
    Sonnet 62 by Francis Petrarch:This poem directly succeeds Sonnet 61. After practically making Laura a god in 61, this poem represents repentence in sonnet 62. He takes responsibility for his actions and wants to turn to God. He wants God to take pity on him.
  17. My ship full of forgetful cargo sails
    through rough seas at the midnight of a winter
    between Charybdis and the Scylla reef,
    my master, no, my foe, is at the helm;

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