Quotes cont.

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DesLee26
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188582
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Quotes cont.
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2012-12-11 02:36:04
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English Final
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  1. 1.     My ship full of forgetful cargo sails
    through rough seas at the midnight of a winter
    between Charybdis and the Scylla reef,
    my master, no, my foe, is at the helm; 
    • o    Sonnet 189 by Francis Petrarch
    • o    It is the poem where he relates his feelings to a ship and how he wants to take the reigns but he's forgetting his power. He lets it happen and convinces himself it'l get better. he mentions that his reason and skill are lost. 
    •  
  2. at each oar sits a quick and insane thought
    that seems to scorn the storm and what it brings;
    the sail, by wet eternal winds of sighs,
    of hopes and of desires blowing, breaks;


    Sonnet 189 by Francis PetrarchIt is the poem where he relates his feelings to a ship and how he wants to take the reigns but he's forgetting his power. He lets it happen and convinces himself it'l get better. he mentions that his reason and skill are lost. 
  3. a rain of tears, a mist of my disdain
    washes and frees those all too weary ropes,
    made up of wrong entwined with ignorance.
    1.     Sonnet 189 by Francis PetrarchIt is the poem where he relates his feelings to a ship and how he wants to take the reigns but he's forgetting his power. He lets it happen and convinces himself it'l get better. he mentions that his reason and skill are lost. 
  4. Hidden are those two trusty signs of mine;
    dead in the waves is reason as is skill,
    and I despair of ever reaching port


    1.     Sonnet 189 by Francis PetrarchIt is the poem where he relates his feelings to a ship and how he wants to take the reigns but he's forgetting his power. He lets it happen and convinces himself it'l get better. he mentions that his reason and skill are lost. 
  5. 1.     A doe of purest white upon green grass
    wearing two horns of gold appeared to me
    between two streams beneath a laurel's shade
    at sunrise in that season not yet ripe
    • o    Sonnet 190 by Francis Petrarch:
    • o    it is a poem about how he sees a doe and stares at it all day. The doe wears the words "No one touch me" on it. He follows it, but she vanishes
  6. The sight of her was so sweetly austere
    that I left all my work to follow her, 
    just like a miser who in search of treasure
    with pleasure makes his effort bitterless.
     Sonnet 190 by Francis Petrarch:o    it is a poem about how he sees a doe and stares at it all day. The doe wears the words "No one touch me" on it. He follows it, but she vanishes
  7. "No one touch me," around her lovely neck
    was written out in diamonds, and in topaz:
    "It pleased my Caesar to create me free."
     Sonnet 190 by Francis Petrarch:o    it is a poem about how he sees a doe and stares at it all day. The doe wears the words "No one touch me" on it. He follows it, but she vanishes
  8. The sun by now had climbed the sky midway,
    my eyes were tired but not full from looking 
    when I feel in the water and she vanished.
     Sonnet 190 by Francis Petrarch:o    it is a poem about how he sees a doe and stares at it all day. The doe wears the words "No one touch me" on it. He follows it, but she vanishes
  9. Clear, fresh, sweet waters, where she who alone seems lady to me rested her lovely body, 
    gentle brach where it pleased her (with sighing I remember) to make a column for her lovely side,
    grass and flowers that her rich garment covered along with her angelic breast, sacred bright air where Love opened my heart
    with her lovely eyes: listen all together to my sorrowful dying words.
    • Petrach Sonnet 126:
    • Poem in which he sees a woman resting in a garden. He says that, although she doesn't know it now, there will come a time when she will desire him and he will be gone. But, because she is so sweet and divine, he will forgive and wipe her tears. Then, he speaks of falling flowers, one of which has Cupid's name on it. She is so beautiful and divine that he thinks he's in heaven. 
  10. If it is indeed my desting and Heaven exerts itself that Love close these eyes while they are still weeping, 
    let some grace bury my poor body among you and let my soul return naked to this its own dwelling;
    death will be less harsh if I bear this hope to the fearful pass, 
    for my weary spirit could never in a more restful port or a more
    tranquil grave flee my laboring flesh and my bones
    Petrach Sonnet 126:Poem in which he sees a woman resting in a garden. He says that, although she doesn't know it now, there will come a time when she will desire him and he will be gone. But, because she is so sweet and divine, he will forgive and wipe her tears. Then, he speaks of falling flowers, one of which has Cupid's name on it. She is so beautiful and divine that he thinks he's in heaven. 
  11. There will come a time perhapes when to her accustomed sojourn the lovely gentle wild one will return 
    and, seeking me, turn her desirous and happy eyes toward where she me ont hat blessed day, 
    and oh the pity! seeing me already dust amid the stones 
    Love will inspire her to sigh so sweetly that she will win mercy 
    for me and force Heaven, drying her eyes with her lovely veil.
    Petrach Sonnet 126:Poem in which he sees a woman resting in a garden. He says that, although she doesn't know it now, there will come a time when she will desire him and he will be gone. But, because she is so sweet and divine, he will forgive and wipe her tears. Then, he speaks of falling flowers, one of which has Cupid's name on it. She is so beautiful and divine that he thinks he's in heaven. 
  12. From the lovely branches was descending (sweet in memory) a rain of flowrs over her bosom, 
    and she was sitting humble in such a glory, alreadyl covered with the loving cloud; 
    this flower was falling on her skity, this one on her blond braids, whichwere burnished gold and pearls to see that day; 
    this one, with a lovely wandering, turning about seemed to say:
    "Here reigns Love."
    Petrach Sonnet 126:Poem in which he sees a woman resting in a garden. He says that, although she doesn't know it now, there will come a time when she will desire him and he will be gone. But, because she is so sweet and divine, he will forgive and wipe her tears. Then, he speaks of falling flowers, one of which has Cupid's name on it. She is so beautiful and divine that he thinks he's in heaven. 
  13. how many times did I say to myself then, full of awe: "She was surely born in paradise!"
    Her divine bearing and her face and her words and her sweet smile had so laden me with forgetfulness
    and so divided me from the true image, that I was sighing:
    :How did I come here and when?" thinking I was in Heaven, not there where I was. From then on this grass has pleased me so that elsewhere I have no peace.
    If you had as many beauties as you have desire, you could boldly leave the wood and go among people.
    Petrach Sonnet 126:Poem in which he sees a woman resting in a garden. He says that, although she doesn't know it now, there will come a time when she will desire him and he will be gone. But, because she is so sweet and divine, he will forgive and wipe her tears. Then, he speaks of falling flowers, one of which has Cupid's name on it. She is so beautiful and divine that he thinks he's in heaven.
  14. Go, grieving rimes of mine, to that hard stone
    Whereunder lies my darling, lies my dear, 
    And cry to her to speak fro heaven's sphere.
    Her mortal part with grass is overgrown.
    • Sonnet 333 by Francis Petrarch:
    • This is the poem where Petrarch grieves the death of Laura and wants nothing else but to die. He basically replaces God with Laura. In this poem, he states how he will immortalize her by writing about her and letting all men know of her. He wants her to draw him to heaven, rather than God. 
  15. Tell her, I'm sick of living; that I'm blown 
    By winds of grief from the course I ought to sterr 
    That praise of her is all my purpose here
    And all my business; that of her alone
    Sonnet 333 by Francis Petrarch:This is the poem where Petrarch grieves the death of Laura and wants nothing else but to die. He basically replaces God with Laura. In this poem, he states how he will immortalize her by writing about her and letting all men know of her. He wants her to draw him to heaven, rather than God. 
  16. Do I go telling, that how she lived adn died
    And lives again in immortality,
    All men may know, adn love my laura's grace
    Sonnet 333 by Francis Petrarch:This is the poem where Petrarch grieves the death of Laura and wants nothing else but to die. He basically replaces God with Laura. In this poem, he states how he will immortalize her by writing about her and letting all men know of her. He wants her to draw him to heaven, rather than God. 
  17. Oh, may she deign to stand at my bedside
    When I come to die; and may she call to me
    And draw me to her in the blessed place!
    Sonnet 333 by Francis Petrarch:This is the poem where Petrarch grieves the death of Laura and wants nothing else but to die. He basically replaces God with Laura. In this poem, he states how he will immortalize her by writing about her and letting all men know of her. He wants her to draw him to heaven, rather than God. 
  18. For there is such a difference between the way men live adn the way they ought to live, that anybody who abandons what is for what ought to be will learn something that will ruin than preserve him, because anyone who determines to act in all circumstances the gpart of a good man must come to ruin among so many who are not good
    • Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince
    • This appears right before Machiavelli states all the traits of a prince and how they are opposites of one another, such as one cruel, one compassionate, one firm, the other unsettled. In this sextion, he states that a prince needs to understand how to avoid getting a bad name from the vices. He must seem virtuous. 
  19. He should select among them the fox and teh lion, because the lion cannot protect himself from traps, and the fox cannot protect himself form the wolves
    • Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince
    • Context: It appears in the topic about a prince's technique of fighting. A prince must learn how to act like a beast and a man. He should be both the fox and the lion because the lion protects himself from wolves and the fox is very slick and can make traps. 
  20. There is nothing more necessary to make a show of possessing than this last quality.
    • Niccolo Machiaveli 
    • Contect: 
    • The prince should be careful not to say anything that will tarnish his reputation. He must give off hte idea of being compassionate and honest. since people judge by their eyes. BEcause people fail to see what things really are, the prince must use his appearance and events to gain success. 
  21. It is not unknown to me that many have been and still are of hte opinion that the affairs fo this world are s under the direction of Fortune
    • Niccolo Machiavel, The Prince
    • First lines of Fortune is a Woman
    • One should let Chance take control ebcause the state of htings changes everyday. Fortune has control of ohalf our lives, but allows us access to the other half
  22. Fortune is arbiter of half of our actions but that she still leaves the control of the other half, or about that, to us
    • Niccolo Machiaveli
    • This is in the context about Fortune and how the world is under the direction of Fortune and so frequently changing. We should let Chance take control
  23. "A way is just to those to whom it is necessary, and arms are holy to him who has no hope save in arms."
    • Niccolo Machiavelli
    • This is near the end where Machiavelli talks about Italy without a man to "heal her wounds" and end the warfare. He says that Italy is praying to god to send someone to save her.
  24. God does not intend to do everything, elst he deprive us of our free will and the share of glory that belongs to us.
    • Niccolo Machiavelli
    • This is near the end where Machiavelli talks about Italy without a man to "heal her wounds" and end the warfare. He says that Italy is praying to god to send someone to save her. 
  25. All this comes from the weakness of the heads, because those who know are not obeyed, and each man thinks he knows.
    • Niccolo Machiavelli
    • This appears near hte end of his essay where he states that Italy needs a savior to end the wars and heal her wounds. He speaks about the exhausted land and the bad military customs. He then says that nothing brings mn honor than when new laws and methods are discsvered. Italy is not lacking in heads. 

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