Quotes cont.

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DesLee26
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188752
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Quotes cont.
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2012-12-11 14:16:08
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English Final
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  1. From fairest creatures we desire increase, 
    That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
    But as the riper should by time decease,
    His tender heir might bear his moemory;
    • Sonnet 1 by Shakespeare:
    • He speaks about a person who is so beautiful that they need to create more of themselves. However, this person is very stingy and only loves himself. He is depriving the world of his beauty. He is hoarding.. Both death and hte man will destroy himself. He is his own enemy. 
  2. But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, 
    Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
    Making a famine where abundance lies,
    Tyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.
    Sonnet 1 by Shakespeare:He speaks about a person who is so beautiful that they need to create more of themselves. However, this person is very stingy and only loves himself. He is depriving the world of his beauty. He is hoarding.. Both death and hte man will destroy himself. He is his own enemy. 
  3. Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament
    And only herald to the gaudy spring,
    Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
    And, tender churl, m mak'st waste in niggarding. 
    Sonnet 1 by Shakespeare:He speaks about a person who is so beautiful that they need to create more of themselves. However, this person is very stingy and only loves himself. He is depriving the world of his beauty. He is hoarding.. Both death and hte man will destroy himself. He is his own enemy. 
  4. Pity the world, or else this glutton be: 
    To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee
    Sonnet 1 by Shakespeare:He speaks about a person who is so beautiful that they need to create more of themselves. However, this person is very stingy and only loves himself. He is depriving the world of his beauty. He is hoarding.. Both death and hte man will destroy himself. He is his own enemy. 
  5. When night's black mantle could most darkness prove,
    And sleep death's image did my senses hire
    From knowledge of myself, then thoughts did move
    Swifter than those most swiftness need require:
    • from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus by Mary Wroth
    • Poem about a woman who is pulled awy from herself when she sleeps. She encounters Venus and Cupid, who provide the fuel of love for several hearts. However, they grab her heart and place it in her body, killing her own heart, and replacing it with the heart of Venus. She then laments her love and is not happy. It's a forced love.
  6. In sleep, a chariot drawn by winged desire
    I saw, where sat bright Venus, Queen of love,
    And at her feet her son, still adding fire
    To burning hearts which she did hold above,
    from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus by Mary WrothPoem about a woman who is pulled awy from herself when she sleeps. She encounters Venus and Cupid, who provide the fuel of love for several hearts. However, they grab her heart and place it in her body, killing her own heart, and replacing it with the heart of Venus. She then laments her love and is not happy. It's a forced love.
  7. But one heart flaming more than all the rest
    The goddess held, and put it to my breast. 
    "Dear son, now shut?" said she, "thus must we win."
    He her obeyed, and martyred my poor heart,
    from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus by Mary WrothPoem about a woman who is pulled awy from herself when she sleeps. She encounters Venus and Cupid, who provide the fuel of love for several hearts. However, they grab her heart and place it in her body, killing her own heart, and replacing it with the heart of Venus. She then laments her love and is not happy. It's a forced love.
  8. I, waking, hoped as dreams it would depart,
    Yet since, O me, a lover I have been
    from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus by Mary WrothPoem about a woman who is pulled awy from herself when she sleeps. She encounters Venus and Cupid, who provide the fuel of love for several hearts. However, they grab her heart and place it in her body, killing her own heart, and replacing it with the heart of Venus. She then laments her love and is not happy. It's a forced love.
  9. Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show, 
    That the dear she might take some pleasure of my pain,
    Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make hr know
    Knowledge might pity win and pity grace obtain
    • Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney:
    • Poem about a man who not just says he loves her to create sonnets. He is loving truly and he wants her to know. His love is painful. She gets pleasure from reading his sonnets with lead to a knowledge of his love. The woman will feel bad and he will get what he wants. However, the means of producing this work is wrong. He is looking at past works to create something new, but his 'muses' tell him to look in his heart, where the real and true ideas are. Study is the wicked step-mother of invention. 
  10. I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe:
    Studying inventions fine, her wits to entertain, 
    Oft turning others' leaves, to see if thence would flow
    Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sunburned brain
    Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney:Poem about a man who not just says he loves her to create sonnets. He is loving truly and he wants her to know. His love is painful. She gets pleasure from reading his sonnets with lead to a knowledge of his love. The woman will feel bad and he will get what he wants. However, the means of producing this work is wrong. He is looking at past works to create something new, but his 'muses' tell him to look in his heart, where the real and true ideas are. Study is the wicked step-mother of invention. 
  11. But words came halting forth, wanting Invention's stay
    Invention, Nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows,
    And others' feet still seemed but strangers in my way
    Thus great with child to speak , and helpless in my throes
    Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney:Poem about a man who not just says he loves her to create sonnets. He is loving truly and he wants her to know. His love is painful. She gets pleasure from reading his sonnets with lead to a knowledge of his love. The woman will feel bad and he will get what he wants. However, the means of producing this work is wrong. He is looking at past works to create something new, but his 'muses' tell him to look in his heart, where the real and true ideas are. Study is the wicked step-mother of invention. 
  12. Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite,
    "Fool," said my Muse to me, "look in thy heart and write."
    Sonnet 1 by Sir Philip Sidney:Poem about a man who not just says he loves her to create sonnets. He is loving truly and he wants her to know. His love is painful. She gets pleasure from reading his sonnets with lead to a knowledge of his love. The woman will feel bad and he will get what he wants. However, the means of producing this work is wrong. He is looking at past works to create something new, but his 'muses' tell him to look in his heart, where the real and true ideas are. Study is the wicked step-mother of invention. 
  13. Happy ye leaves when as those lilly hands,
    Which hold my lfie in their dead doing might
    Shall handle you and hold in loves soft badns
    Lyke captives trembling at the victors sight
    • Edmund Spencer:
    • Poem about a man who writes to please a woman, but is not worried about particularly attaining her. There is a portrayal of hte anxiety of love through death and lilies (death). The women is the victor and has control over him. In essence, this poem is about a man who has gotten hte girl, but now needs to please. 
  14. And happy lines on which with starry light, 
    Those lamping eyes will deigne sometimes to look
    And reade the sorrowes of my dying spright,
    Written with teares in harts close bleeding book.
    Edmund Spencer:Poem about a man who writes to please a woman, but is not worried about particularly attaining her. There is a portrayal of hte anxiety of love through death and lilies (death). The women is the victor and has control over him. In essence, this poem is about a man who has gotten hte girl, but now needs to please. 
  15. And hapy rymes bathed in the sacred brooke 
    Of Helicon whence she derived is, 
    When ye behold that Angels blessed looke, 
    my soules long lacked foode, my heavens blis.
    Edmund Spencer:Poem about a man who writes to please a woman, but is not worried about particularly attaining her. There is a portrayal of hte anxiety of love through death and lilies (death). The women is the victor and has control over him. In essence, this poem is about a man who has gotten hte girl, but now needs to please. 
  16. Leaves, lines, and rymes, seeke her to please alone,
    Whom if ye please, I care for other none
    Edmund Spencer:Poem about a man who writes to please a woman, but is not worried about particularly attaining her. There is a portrayal of hte anxiety of love through death and lilies (death). The women is the victor and has control over him. In essence, this poem is about a man who has gotten hte girl, but now needs to please. 
  17. One day I wrote her name upon a strand, 
    But came the waves and washed it away:
    Agayne I wrote it with a second hand, 
    But came the tyde adn made my paynes his pray.
    • Edmund Spencer
    • Poem about a man who attempts to write his love's name in the sand, but the waves keep clearing it. Although he keeps trying, she tells him that all things are perishable.He says no, because 'you shall live by fame:' He will use his verses to immortalize her
  18. "Vayne man," sayd she "that doest in vaine assay
    A mortall thing so to immortalize, 
    For I my selve shall lyke to this decay 
    And eek my name bee wyped out lykewize."
    Edmund SpencerPoem about a man who attempts to write his love's name in the sand, but the waves keep clearing it. Although he keeps trying, she tells him that all things are perishable.He says no, because 'you shall live by fame:' He will use his verses to immortalize her
  19. "Not so," quod I, "let baser things devize
    To dy in dust, but you shall live by fame: 
    My verse your virtues rare shall eternalize
    And in the heavens wryte your glorious name
    Edmund SpencerPoem about a man who attempts to write his love's name in the sand, but the waves keep clearing it. Although he keeps trying, she tells him that all things are perishable.He says no, because 'you shall live by fame:' He will use his verses to immortalize her
  20. Where whenas death shall all the world subdew, 
    Our love shall live, and later life renew
    Edmund SpencerPoem about a man who attempts to write his love's name in the sand, but the waves keep clearing it. Although he keeps trying, she tells him that all things are perishable.He says no, because 'you shall live by fame:' He will use his verses to immortalize her

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