ANSC 100

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Author:
ARM
ID:
189784
Filename:
ANSC 100
Updated:
2012-12-16 14:08:57
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EIGHT Biosecurity
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Description:
Biosecurity
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  1. Define Biosecurity
    • a planned system to prevent the introduction or transmission of communicable disease by cross-contamination within a herd, flock or a population
    • It is all about preventing infection!
  2. Why does biosecurity matter?
    • •Protects investment of time, effort, money and animals.
    • •Like “insurance” for animals (wild and domestic animal populations).
    • •Protects others’ animals.
    • •In laboratory research settings, protects research animals, and investment of time, effort, resources.
  3. What are the three agents in which determine whether an infection wll occur? Which of these does biosecurity stomp?
    • –Pathogenicity of Agent
    • biosecurity can control:
    • –Dose of exposure (can reduce pathogen load in enviro)
    • –Host Immunity
  4. What were the three overarching principals of the video?
    • access management
    • animal health management
    • operational management
  5. How is access management done
    • 1. Designate destinct zones
    • -boundaries, single access point, signs/markers, lockable
    • -restricted access zone: is the area of greates risk where all the animals are housed essentially only equipment and the essential personal only
    • -controlled access zone: buffer, the first level of defense, less restricted access but still limited to necessary people/ movement
    • 2. Control the movement into and between zones
    • wash vehicles and equipment
    • hygiene: shower, hand wash, change
    • visitor log
    • Control people, animal and vehicle traffic on and off farm and between areas on farm.
    • Have feed deliveries to isolated areas away from animals.
  6. How is Animal Health management done?
    • 3. Manage Animal movement
    • purchase from supplier with good animal health programs
    • maintain animal ID for tracability and record keeping
    • isolate animals after arrival to prevent disease spread
    • evaluate before introducing to other animals
    • isolate animals that have been off farm ie fairs, exhibitions, breeding
    • 4. Observe animals for signs of disease
    • record keeping
    • disease prevention programs (ie vaccinations)
    • postmortems of dead
    • look for signs of declining health
    • Be alert and aware of outbreaks in neighbouring areas (communicate with vets)
    • Establish response plans for disease situations
    • ID and know triggers for initiating actions
    • -decline in appetite and growth, large #s of animals showing signs, deaths
    • train employees
    • maintain various contact info
    • know immediate steps to limit movement of animals, byproducts and people and equipment

  7. How is Operational Management done?
    • 6. Properly dispose of dead stock
    • -know and follow regulations
    • -have plans for extraordinary losses
    • -prevent scavanging
    • 7. Safely manage manure
    • -know and obey rules
    • -record keeping of: treatment, sale, movement and where/how used
    • 8. keep premises including buildings, vehicles, and equipment clean
    • designate areas for cleaning equipment and vehicles
    • schedule building cleaning
    • use hot water and disinfectant
    • water lines, troughs, and feeders
    • 9. Maintain Facilities and Equipment in good repair
    • –Aids in cleaning
    • –Prevents injury to animals and people
    • –Helps reduce pests/vermin hiding places.
    • 10. Obtain Production Inputs from reliable Sources
    • –Feed, bedding, etc.
    • –Suppliers follow good manufacturing practices
    • –Delivery people willing to participate in your program
    • –Proper storage on-premises (reduce contamination, reduce pests)
    • –Test water/evaluate source
    • 11. Control Pests
    • –Keep them out of feed, bedding, etc.
    • –Birds, rodents, insects
    • –Cut back vegetation around buildings and equipment
    • –Secure doors
    • –Clean up spills, use vermin-proof containers
    • 12.Plan Biosecurity and Train Staff
    • Consultative process – with staff
    • Ensure everyone understands importance/need and each step
    • Train regularly – SOPs, etc.
    • Inform and supervise visitors.
  8. What are the environmental factors that determine the length of time a pathogen will be a threat?
    • drying forces
    • level of organic matter
    • pH (acidity)
    • oxidation
    • radiation (sunlight)
    • temperature
    • control of vectors
  9. What are some physical and chemical methods of microbial control?
    • •Physical Methods:
    • –Heat–autoclave, boiling, pasteurization
    • –Radiation– ionizing, ultraviolet
    • –Filtration– HEPA for air; fluid filters
    • –Dessication –drying, osmotic pressure (salt or sugar)
    • •Chemical Methods:
    • –Disinfectants
    • –Acid washes, etc.
    • –Antiseptics (for living tissue surfaces)
    • –Disinfectants (incl. Acids)
    • –Sanitizers (for food prep surfaces)
    • –Detergents
  10. What is chemical agent effect determined by?
    • –Optimal concentration
    • –Contact time between microorganism and chemical
    • –Temperature
    • –Absence of interfering materials
    • ****Many are toxic to tissue/cells of animals
  11. What are Sanitizers vs detergents
    • Sanitizer
    • reduces the number of organisms to safe levels as determined by public health officials
    • term used in food saftery and industry service estblishments
    • ie purrell
    • Detergents
    • •Wetting agents, emulsifiers
    • •Includes Quaternary Ammonium compounds.
    • •Effective against bacteria, and some fungi, protozoa, viruses
    • •Oral ingestion is poisonous
    • •May be irritant to skin
    • •Activity reduced by organic matter
  12. What are the principles for disinfection?
    • Select proper products for intended purpose (disinfectant or antiseptic?)
    • select based on properties of pathogens likely present
    • correct dilution is vital
    • avoid mixing with other products
    • avoid (first remove) organic material (soil, feces, blood)
    • observe recommended contact time
    • caution: toxicity enviro impact
  13. What are the steps in sanitizing animal facilities and equipment
    • 1. remove equipment (cover electrical)
    • 2. clean pens and equipment- remove organic material (hot water/ detergent)
    • 3. disinfect (farm-specific product)
    • 4. dry
    • 5. monitor ( quality control testing)
    • 6. deal with other invasive threats ie pests
  14. Why is washing pens important ?
    • •Washing of pens or barns has become a routine part of pig production.
    • •numerous reasons, but the main one is that washing removes bacteria, viruses and parasites left behind from the
    • previous batch of pigs.
    • •Most diseases are dose dependant; this means the higher the dose a pig is exposed to the sicker they'll get.
    • • Washing the pens reduces the number of disease causing organisms (bacterial or viral load)  and so the animals grow better and are healthier.
    • •The use of a soap is recommended because it will help remove the greasy film of organic matter that sticks firmly to the pen floor or wall. This biofilm can shelter bacteria and viruses from removal and disinfection.
    • •Disinfectants are essential to kill whatever bacteria or viruses remain after washing.
    • •Disinfection is not effective without a thorough wash first. Organic matter such as manure or bedding needs to be removed before a disinfectant will be effective.
  15. Why is washing pens important
    • •Most diseases are dose dependant; this means the higher the dose a pig is exposed to the sicker they'll get
    • • Washing the pens reduces the number of disease causing organisms (bacterial or viral load)  and so the animals grow better and are healthier.
    • •The use of a soap is recommended because it will help remove the greasy film of organic matter that sticks firmly to the pen floor or wall. This biofilm can shelter bacteria and viruses from removal and disinfection.
    • •Disinfectants are essential to kill whatever bacteria or viruses remain after washing.
    • •Disinfection is not effective without a thorough wash first. Organic matter such as manure or bedding needs to be removed before a disinfectant will be effective.
    • •Presoaking pens with water to loosen manure can cut washing time almost in half.
    • •Overall, the use of hot water speeds up washing time about 22%, except in the case of presoaking where the use of hot
    • water didn't decrease wash time when compared with cold water.
    • •The use of soap speeds up washing about 8
    • minutes per pen (about 12%)
  16. How are routes of contamination minimized?
    • vermin control- rodents
    • bird proofing barns and feed
    • flies- reduce breeding ares, foot puddles,
    • humans- use foot dips, clothing changes, shower, clean equipment and vehicles

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