Vocabularies 5

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Vocabularies 5
2013-01-03 18:01:57
MCAT English

MCAT Vocabularies 5
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  1. Caustic
    Capable of destroying or eating away by chemical action 

    • The chemical was so caustic that it ate through the pipes.
    • (Of remarks) bitter or sarcastic 

    She wrote a caustic report about the decisions that led to the crisis. 
  2. Recess
    A part of a room set back from the main part

    We can put the dining-table in that recess. 

    The time during which parliment or the law-courts do not work.

    Parliment is in recess. 
  3. Egocentric
    Concerned with the individual rather than society 

    Limited in outlook or concern to one's own activities or needs

    The cult attracts egocentric people who are pre occupied with reaching their potential as individual. 
  4. Chronometer
    An accurate clock (esp used in navigation)
  5. circumnavigate
    To proceed completely around ("circumnavigating the earth")

    To sail around (especially the earth)
  6. circuitous
    Being or taking roundabout, lengthy course

    Took a circuitous route to avoid the accident site. 

    Not being direct in language or action. (a circuitous explanation)
  7. Proclaim
    To announce or state publicly 

    He was proclaimed the winner. 
  8. Acclaim
    To applaud or welcome enthusiastically 

    To declare (someone) ruler, winer etc by enthusiastic approval. (The footballer was acclaimed by the fans.) 

    • A noisy demonstration of applause, aggreement, approval.
    • (They acclaimed him king.) 
  9. Clamor
    Noisy shouting

    • A loud continuous noise 
    • A clamor outside woke them in the night. 

    Insistent public expression (as of support or protest) 

    • A public clamor for an arrest in the case
    • The representatives clamored their disapproval. 
  10. Recline
    To lean or incline backwards

    She was reclining on the sofa, watching TV. 

    The theater has reclining seats. 

    He reclined his seat so that he could nap more comfortably. 
  11. Proclivity
    A natural propensity or inclination; predisposition 

    Showed artistic proclivity at an early age. 
  12. Cohesive
    Tendency to cohere or stick together

    Their tribe is a small but cohesive group. 

    Religion can be used as a cohesive social force. 
  13. Bureaucracy
    A system of government by officials working for government. 

    A government characterized by specialization of function, adherence to fixed rules and a hierarchy of authority. 

    Both candidates pledges to simplify the state's bloated bureaucracy. 
  14. Aristocracy
    Government by the best individuals or by a small privileged class

    A government in which power is vested in a minority consisting of those believed to be best qualified 

    At one time in China only the aristocracy could own land. 
  15. Crescendo
    A gradual and continuous increase in loudness (esp in music) 

    The noise rose to a crescendo. 

    Their divorce was merely the formal crescendo of a long period of marital stress and estrangement. 
  16. Credentials
    Testimonials or certified documents showing that a person is entitled to credit or has a right to exercise official pwer 

    My experiance as a manager is my strongest credential. 
  17. Cryptic
    Having or seeming to have a hidden or ambiguous meaning 

    "cryptic message"
  18. Cryptography
    The science or study of secret writing, especially codes and ciphers. 

    Companies often use cryptography to protect private information. 
  19. Succumb
    To submit to an overpowering force or yield to an overwhelming desire. 

    She succumbed to temptation and ate the chocolate. 

    They will pressure you ad you must try not to succumb. 
  20. Recumbent
    lying down; in a position of comfort or rest.
  21. Culprit
    One guilty of a crime or a fault 

    The police eventually located the culprits.

    As soon as he saw the broken window he began to look for the culprit. 
  22. Culpable
    Deserving blame; guilty

    They held her culpable for the accident. 

    He's more culpable than the others because he's old enough to know better. 
  23. Demographics
    The characteristics of human populations and population segments, especially when used to identify consumer markets

    The demographics of the southwest indicates a growing population of older consumers. 
  24. Dilate
    To speak or write at great lenght on a subject; expatiate 

    To become wider or larger; expand 

    The sudden darkness made the puppils of his eyes dilate.

    The drug causes the blood vessels to dilate. 
  25. Digress
    To turn aside expecially from the main subject of attention or course of argument. 

    He digressed so often that it was hard to follow what he was saying. 

    If I can digress for a moment, I'd like to briefly mention her earlier films. 
  26. Dictate
    • To say or read for someone else to write down 
    • He always dictates his letter to his secretary. 

    • To state officially or with authority 
    • He dictates the terms of our offer. 

    • To give orders to; to command
    • I certainly won't be dictated by you. 
  27. Dignify
    To confer dignity or honor; give distinction to 

    She felt that formal clothing would help dignify the occasion. 

    He said he wouldn't dignify his opponent's accusations by responding to them. 
  28. Indignant
    Angry, usually because of some wrong that has been done to oneslef or others. 

    I feel most indignant at the rude way I've been treated. 

    He was very indignant about the changes. 

    She wrote an indignant letter to the editor. 
  29. Dissipate
    • To break up and scatter or vanish 
    • The clouds soon dissipated. 
    • The team's early momentum has dissipated. 

    • To spend or use up wastefully or foolishly 
    • Dissipated the family fortune in reckless business ventures. 
  30. Paradox
    A seemingly contradictory statement that may nonetheless be true. 

    It is a paradox that computers need maintenance so often, since they are meant to save people time. 

    As an actor, he's a paradox-- he loves being in the public eye but also deeply values and protects his privacy.