ENG1101

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Author:
JonJon2327
ID:
195262
Filename:
ENG1101
Updated:
2013-01-25 13:59:09
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English Type Errors
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Description:
English Type I Errors
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  1. FRAGMENT
    • Incomplete SentenceLacks a subject, verb, or both
    • May be a phrase
    • May be a subordinate clause
    • May have –ing verb alone
  2. PHRASE
    • Group of related words without both a subject and a verb
    • May be a noun phrase--the little old woman
    • May be a verb phrase--dancing wildly to the music
    • May be a prepositional phrase--to the lake, under the dock, in the lake
  3. VERB PHRASE
    • Gerund
    • Participial
    • Infinitive
  4. GERUND
    Verb that functions as a subject of the sentence
  5. PARTICIPAL
    Verb that modifies the whole sentence
  6. INFINITIVE
    to plus the singular present form of the verb
  7. CLAUSES
    • Independent or Main
    • Dependent or Subordiate
  8. INDEPENDENT or MAIN CLAUSE
    • Can stand alone as a sentence
    • Both types have a subject and a verb
  9. DEPENDENT or SUBORDIATE
    • Cannot stand alone
    • Begins with a subordinate conjunction
    • Because it is raining today
    • Both types have a subject and a verb
  10. -ING VERBS
    • Cannot stand alone
    • Must have a main verb with it
    • May be the wrong form of the verb
  11. APPOSITIVE PHRASE
    Renames or re-identifies the noun
  12. RUN-ON or FUSED SENTENCE
    • Two complete sentences put together without any punctuation at all.
    • We went out to eat then we went to the ballgame.
  13. COMMA SPLICE 
    • Two complete sentences joined only by a comma
    • A stronger mark of punctuation is needed.
    • We went out to eat, then we went to the ballgame.
  14. HOW DO YOU CORRECT RUN-ON/COMMA SPLICES?
    • Separate into two sentences
    • Use a semi-colon
    • Use a period and a capital letter
    • Add a coordinating conjunction with a comma
    • Add a conjunctive adverb with a semicolon Add a subordinating conjunction
  15. TYPES OF CONJUCTIONS
    • Coordinating (comma)
    • Conjunctive Adverb (semi-colon)
    • Subordinating (alone or with a comma)
  16. NAME COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS 
    • FANBOYS For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So
    • Use this conjunction between main clauses with a comma before the conjunction
    • It is raining today, so I need my umbrella.
  17. NAME CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS
    • Examples are therefore, however, thus, then, also, consequently, nevertheless, besides
    • Phrases are after all, as a result, by the way, even so, in fact, that is, in contrast
    • Use a semi-colon between the main clauses and a comma after the conjunctive adverb
    • He has political aspirations; after all, his father is a senator.
  18. SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS
    • Examples are because, if, since, when, even though, as, until, unless, while, before, after
    • If a subordinate clause begins a sentence, use a comma at the end of the sentence.
    • Unless the project receives more funding, the research will stop.
    • If a subordinate clause ends a sentence, there is no comma.
    • Everyone likes him because he is helpful.
  19. SUBJECT VERB AGREEMENT MEANS?
    Subject and verb must agree in number
  20. IF THE SUBJECT IS SINGULAR, THE VERB MUST BE...WHAT?
    • Singular - remember the singular verbs end in S!
    • HE - goes, does, is, was, has
  21. IF THE SUBJECT IS PLURAL, THE VERB MUST BE...WHAT?
    • Plural 
    • THEY - go, do, are, were, have
  22. PREPOSITIONAL PHRASE
    A phrase used to show the relationship of a noun or a pronoun to another noun
  23. COMPOUND SUBJECTS
    • Subjects joined by and are plural.
    • Tom and Harry work at McDonald’s.
    • Subjects joined by or are singular.
    • Tom or Harry works the night shift.
  24. CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTION SUBJECTS
    • Subjects joined by either…or, or by neither…nor agree with the closest subject.
    • Neither the students nor the teacher is happy.
    • Neither the student nor the teachers are happy.
  25. INVERTED WORD ORDER
    • Sentences which begin with here, there, or with prepositional phrases will have the subject after the verb.
    • There are three reasons why we should not go.
    • Questions will often have the subject after the verb.
    • Can Harry go with me to the game?
  26. INDEFINITE PRONOUNS
    • Indefinite pronouns take singular verbs.
    • The indefinite pronouns are –one words, -body words, -thing words, and each, either, and neither.
    • Everybody in the class is tired.
    • Something is always wrong with Sam.
    • Everything in the house needs repairing.
  27. COLLECTIVE NOUNS
    • These nouns often cause problems because while they refer to a group or an amount, they take a singular verb.
    • Ten million gallons is a lot of oil.
  28. TITLES
    • Titles of movies, books, songs, and other works take a singular verb.
    • Seven is a horror movie based on a classical piece of literature.
  29. EXCEPTION WORDS
    • Some words (nouns) end in an s but take a singular verb.
    • Such words include economics, electronics, measles, mumps, news, physics.
    • Aerobics is a good exercise to increase the heart rate.

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