Lit Exam: Oroonoko

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DesLee26
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203640
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Lit Exam: Oroonoko
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2013-02-26 19:32:17
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Lit Midterm
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  1. I do not pretend, in giving you the history of this Royal Slave, to entertain my reader with adventures of a feigned hero, whose life and fortunes fancy may manage at the poet’s pleasure; nor in relating the truth, design to adorn it with any accidents but such as arrived in earnest to him: and it shall come simply into the world, recommended by its own proper merits and natural intrigues; there being enough of reality to support it, and to render it diverting, without the addition of invention.
    The very beginning of Oroonoko where Aphra Behn states out her purpose for writing. She says that she is not putting invention to make her story good. She states there will be no happy ending. However, she lies aloo about this. Because its nt really true
  2. I was myself an eye-witness to a great part of what you will find here set down; and what I could not be witness of, I received from the mouth of the chief actor in this history, the hero himself, who gave us the whole transactions of his youth: and though I shall omit, for brevity’s sake, a thousand little accidents of his life, which, however pleasant to us, where history was scarce and adventures very rare, yet might prove tedious and heavy to my reader, in a world where he finds diversions for every minute, new and strange. But we who were perfectly charmed with the character of this great man were curious to gather every circumstance of his life.
    The very beginning of Oroonko when she states out her purpose for writing. She sets herself up as a character in this.
  3. He came into the room, and addressed himself to me and some other women with the best grace in the world. He was pretty tall, but of a shape the most exact that can be fancied: the most famous statuary could not form the figure of a man more admirably turned from head to foot. His face was not of that brown rusty black which most of that nation are, but of perfect ebony, or polished jet.
    This is a description of Oroonoko. Behn says that she has conversed with this man and describes him as a man of greatness of courage and mind, a judgement more solid. She says that he knew almost as much as if he had read. This is a contrast of him to the other africans basically.
  4. His eyes were the most awful that could be seen, and very piercing; the white of ’em being like snow, as were his teeth. His nose was rising and Roman, instead of African and flat. His mouth the finest shaped that could be seen; far from those great turned lips which are so natural to the rest of the negroes.
    This is a description of Oroonoko. Behn says that she has conversed with this man and describes him as a man of greatness of courage and mind, a judgement more solid. She says that he knew almost as much as if he had read. This is a contrast of him to the other africans basically.
  5. The whole proportion and air of his face was so nobly and exactly formed that, bating his color, there could be nothing in nature more beautiful, agreeable, and handsome. There was no one grace wanting that bears the standard of true beauty.
    This is a description of Oroonoko. Behn says that she has conversed with this man and describes him as a man of greatness of courage and mind, a judgement more solid. She says that he knew almost as much as if he had read. This is a contrast of him to the other africans basically.
  6. His hair came down to his shoulders, by the aids of art, which was by pulling it out with a quill, and keeping it combed; of which he took particular care. Nor did the perfections of his mind come short of those of his person; for his discourse was admirable upon almost any subject: and whoever had heard him speak would have been convinced of their errors, that all fine wit is confined to the white men, especially to those of Christendom; and would have confessed that Oroonoko was as capable even of reigning well, and of governing as wisely, had as great a soul, as politic maxims, and was as sensible of power, as any prince civilized in the most refined schools of humanity and learning, or the most illustrious courts.
    This is a description of Oroonoko. Behn says that she has conversed with this man and describes him as a man of greatness of courage and mind, a judgement more solid. She says that he knew almost as much as if he had read. This is a contrast of him to the other africans basically.
  7. he fought as if he came on purpose to die, and did such things as will not be believed that human strength could perform, and such as soon inspired all the rest with new courage and new order
    • Oroonoko
    • This occurs after Oroonoko finds out that Imoinda has "died" when in reality, she was sold into slavery. He does not have the desire to fight anymore. He gets severely depressed and doesn't even want to fight or lead his men anymore. But, seeing his army die wakes him up from his slumber (two days worth) and says that if they will die, they will meet death the noblest of ways. Then, he leads them and inspires the men.
  8. And they all with one accord assured him, they could not suffer enough when it was for his repose and safety
    This occurs after Oroonoko has been tricked into going into a ship. He gets captured, as well as his men, and are on their way to becoming slaves. Oroonoko finally convinces the captain to free him because they believe that if they give Oroonoko his freedom (of movement on the ship in terms of being manacled), he would inspire the people to eat. This occurs after
  9. “Farewell, Sir, ’tis worth my sufferings to gain so true a knowledge both of you and of your gods by whom you swear.”
    Oroonoko gets sold into slavery and this is after he is leaving the captain, who is described as guilty. He says this because the captain had swore an oath to God and broke his oath prior to this
  10. Oroonoko then replied, he was very sorry to hear that the captain pretended to the knowledge and worship of any gods, who had taught him no better principles than not to credit as he would be credited. But they told him, the difference of their faith occasioned that distrust: for the captain had protested to him upon the word of a Christian, and sworn in the name of a great God; which if he should violate, he would expect eternal torment in the world to come. “Is that all the obligation he has to be just to his oath?”
    This occurs after O is captured and the captain gives O an oath when O refuses to eat. The captain fears the loss of so many slaves because they are all refusing to eat and gives his oath to Oroonoko, who, never being exposed to lies before, believes it.
  11. he saw an honesty in his eyes, and he found him wise and witty enough to understand honor: for it was one of his maxims, A man of wit could not be a knave or villain.
    trefry buys the slaves and likes O's company. Eventually, he promises to him that he'd find a way to get him back to his country. Oroonoko believes him and sees an honesty in his eyes and because he saw Trefry was wise, he believed this
  12. But his misfortune was to fall in an obscure world, that afforded only a female pen to celebrate his fame; though I doubt not but it had lived from others’ endeavors if the Dutch, who immediately after his time took that country, had not killed, banished, and dispersed all those that were capable of giving the world this great man’s life much better than I have done.
    After Oroonoko gets his named changed to Caesar, which is given to him by Trefry because he believed he would have been a Caesar
  13. he was received more like a governor than a slave
    After this is said, they assign him his portion of land, his house, and his business, up in the plantation
  14. At last, he would needs go view his land, his house, and the business assigned him. But he no sooner came to the houses of the slaves, which are like a little town by itself, the negroes all having left work, but they all came forth to behold him, and found he was that prince who had, at several times, sold most of ’em to these parts; and from a veneration they pay to great men, especially if they know ’em, and from the surprise and awe they had at the sight of him, they all cast themselves at his feet, crying out, in their language, “Live, O King! Long live, O King!” and kissing his feet, paid him even divine homage.
    This is after he is sold into slavery, and settled into his place with his name and all
  15. However, these conversations failed not altogether so well to divert him that he liked the company of us women much above the men, for he could not drink, and he is but an ill companion in that country that cannot. So that obliging him to love us very well, we had all the liberty of speech with him, especially myself, whom he called his Great Mistress; and indeed my word would go a great way with him.
    After O is captured and he is settled in his place, he frequently has dinners with Aphra Behn, where he entertains them with the lieves of the Romans and great men and Clemene with pretty works, but he is still discontent. After this, Aphra Behn tells them that if he steps out of line, they would treat him like a slave
  16. For these reasons I had opportunity to take notice to him that he was not well pleased of late, as he used to be; was more retired and thoughtful; and told him, I took it ill he should suspect we would break our words with him, and not permit both him and Clemene to return to his own kingdom, which was not so long a way but when he was once on his voyage he would quickly arrive there. He made me some answers that showed a doubt in him, which made me ask what advantage it would be to doubt. It would but give us a fear of him, and possibly compel us to treat him so as I should be very loth to behold: that is, it might occasion his confinement.
    After O is captured and he is settled in his place, he frequently has dinners with Aphra Behn, where he entertains them with the lieves of the Romans and great men and Clemene with pretty works, but he is still discontent. After this, Aphra Behn tells them that if he steps out of line, they would treat him like a slave
  17. Perhaps this was not so luckily spoke of me, for I perceived he resented that word, which I strove to soften again in vain. However, he assured me that, whatsoever resolutions he should take, he would act nothing upon the white people; and as for myself, and those upon that plantation where he was, he would sooner forfeit his eternal liberty, and life itself, than lift his hand against his greatest enemy on that place.
    This is after the author realizes that she slips up in her conversation with O by saying that if he continues to suspect that the people are lying to him, they would begin to treat him in a very bad way
  18. Caesar, having singled out these men from the women and children, made an harangue to ’em, of the miseries and ignominies of slavery; counting up all their toils and sufferings, under such loads, burdens, and drudgeries as were fitter for beasts than men; senseless brutes, than human souls. He told ’em, it was not for days, months, or years, but for eternity; there was no end to be of their misfortunes: they suffered not like men who might find a glory and fortitude in oppression; but like dogs, that loved the whip and bell, and fawned the more they were beaten: that they had lost the divine quality of men, and were become insensible asses, fit only to bear:
    This occurs when Clemene is showing signs of birthing soon. Caesar becomes very anxious and organizes an army of men, 200, 150 who bore arms. They were caught however, and whipped
  19. “My Lord, we have listened with joy and attention to what you have said; and, were we only men, would follow so great a leader through the world. But oh! consider we are husbands, and parents too, and have things more dear to us than life; our wives and children, unfit for travel in those unpassable woods, mountains, and bogs. We have not only difficult lands to overcome, but rivers to wade, and mountains to encounter; ravenous beasts of prey."
    after their first failed attempt, a slave called Tuscan implores Caesar tos stop because they can't go anymore. They have already been whipped at around this time.
  20. It had been well for him if he had sacrificed me instead of giving me the contemptible whip
    This is after Caesar is whipped and Clemene gives the governor a fatal wound. Caesar wants to remain alive because he wants revenge on Byam. Byam, their leader, their head. He says he will obey them in anything, but his revenge on Byam
  21. he told her his design, first of killing her, and then his enemies, and next himself, and the impossibility of escaping, and therefore he told her the necessity of dying. He found the heroic wife faster pleading for death that he was to propose it, when she found his fixed resolution; and, on her knees, besought him not to leave her a prey to his enemies.
    He tells Trefry to trust him and let him walk on his own. Near the end right when he will rebel against

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