Lit Exam

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DesLee26
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204008
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Lit Exam
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2013-02-28 01:13:23
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HON 112
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  1. Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner thingsTo low ambition, and the pride of kings.Let us (since life can little more supplyThan just to look about us and to die)Expatiate free o’er all this scene of man;
    • Essay on Man: Pope
    • The very first lines where Pope invoks Milton in terms of the no middle flight and sets up his purpose about talking about a scene of man (theatrical)
  2. A mighty maze! but not without a plan;A wild, where weeds and flowers promiscuous shoot;Or garden tempting with forbidden fruit.
    Essay on Man: PopeThe very first lines where Pope invoks Milton in terms of the no middle flight and sets up his purpose about talking about a scene of man (theatrical)
  3. Together let us beat this ample field,Try what the open, what the covert yield;The latent tracts, the giddy heights, exploreOf all who blindly creep, or sightless soar;
    Essay on Man: PopeThe very first lines where Pope invoks Milton in terms of the no middle flight and sets up his purpose about talking about a scene of man (theatrical)
  4. Eye Nature’s walks, shoot Folly as it flies,And catch the manners living as they rise;Laugh where we must, be candid where we can;But vindicate the ways of God to man.
    • Essay on Man: PopeThe very first lines where Pope invoks Milton in terms of the no middle flight and sets up his purpose about talking about a scene of man (theatrical)
    • Unlike Milton, he is vindicating as opposed to justifying
  5. Who sees with equal eye, as God of all,A hero perish, or a sparrow fall,Atoms or systems into ruin hurled,And now a bubble burst, and now a world.
    Epistle 1.III, where he talks about how heaven hid the book of fate and man's hopes for a better future, but he should hope humbly
  6. Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutored mindSees God in clouds, or hears Him in the wind;His soul, proud science never taught to strayFar as the solar walk, or milky way;Yet simple Nature to his hope has given,
    • Essay on Man: Pope
    • Epistle i. III
    • uses an indian to emphasize how he does not hope for anything more and he seems to be happy
  7. Go, wiser thou! and, in thy scale of sense,Weigh thy opinion against providence;Call imperfection what thou fanciest such,Say, here He gives too little, there too much;
    • Essay on Man: Pope
    • Epistle 1.IV
    • He condemns the aspirations of people to gain more knowledge and attempting to gain perfection
  8. Destroy all creatures for thy sport or gust,Yet cry, if man’s unhappy, God’s unjust;If man alone engross not Heaven’s high care,Alone made perfect here, immortal there:Snatch from His hand the balance and the rod,Re-judge His justice, be the God of God.In pride, in reasoning pride, our error lies;
    Essay on Man: PopeEpistle 1.IVHe condemns the aspirations of people to gain more knowledge and attempting to gain perfection
  9. All quit their sphere, and rush into the skies.Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes,Men would be angels, angels would be gods.Aspiring to be gods, if angels fell,Aspiring to be angels, men rebel:
    Essay on Man: PopeEpistle 1.IVHe condemns the aspirations of people to gain more knowledge and attempting to gain perfection
  10. And who but wishes to invert the lawsOf order, sins against the Eternal Cause.
    Essay on Man: PopeEpistle 1.IVHe condemns the aspirations of people to gain more knowledge and attempting to gain perfection
  11. Here with degrees of swiftness, there of force;All in exact proportion to the state;Nothing to add, and nothing to abate.Each beast, each insect, happy in its own:Is Heaven unkind to man, and man alone?Shall he alone, whom rational we call,Be pleased with nothing, if not blessed with all?
    • Essay on Man: Pope
    • Epistle 1.VI
    • Man wants to be everything but what man is. He wants to be like th eangels, but he also wants qualities of the animals. He is constantly rebelling
  12. The bliss of man (could pride that blessing find) 
    Is not to act or think beyond mankind
    • Epistle 1. VI
    • Don't go beyond what you are
  13. All this dread order break—for whom? for thee?Vile worm!—Oh, madness! pride! impiety!
    • Epistle 1. VIII
    • Pope condemns man for stepping out of the proper order of hte universe. For what, he says? For himself? He says that it will throw the whole universe in imbalance
  14. All nature is but art, unknown to thee;All chance, direction, which thou canst not see;All discord, harmony not understood;
    • Epistle 1.X
    • This is where he pleads with man to know his place. He implores them to submit and let Nature do its job. Nature is not to be known
  15. Know, then, thyself, presume not God to scan;The proper study of mankind is man.
    • Epistle II
    • Man should not attempt to pry into God. Man should only study man and that is it, not God. He will be overstepping his boundaries if he does this
  16. Go, wondrous creature! mount where science guides,Go, measure earth, weigh air, and state the tides;Instruct the planets in what orbs to run,Correct old time, and regulate the sun;Go, soar with Plato to th’ empyreal sphere,To the first good, first perfect, and first fair;Or tread the mazy round his followers trod,And quitting sense call imitating God;As Eastern priests in giddy circles run,And turn their heads to imitate the sun.Go, teach Eternal Wisdom how to rule—Then drop into thyself, and be a fool!
    • Epistle 2. II
    • This is when he speaks of man knowing his boundaries and studying himself rather than studying God. He talks about too much knowledge and how reasoning is in error
  17. Trace Science, then, with Modesty thy guide;First strip off all her equipage of pride;Deduct what is but vanity or dress,Or learning’s luxury, or idleness;Or tricks to show the stretch of human brain,Mere curious pleasure, or ingenious pain;Expunge the whole, or lop th’ excrescent partsOf all our vices have created arts;Then see how little the remaining sum,Which served the past, and must the times to come!
    Epistle 2. IIThis is when he speaks of man knowing his boundaries and studying himself rather than studying God. He talks about too much knowledge and how reasoning is in error. He says that his attempts will be in vain, as if someone running in circles trying to imitate the sun, when they're not even close
  18. But what composes man, can man destroy?Suffice that Reason keep to Nature’s road,
    • epistle 2.III
    • he talks about passions and how, althoiugh they are selfish, if theiy are fair, then they deserve care. Strength of mind is exercise, not rest. Passions can be tempered and employed

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