Barron's 3500 List 21

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iamsly
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207295
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Barron's 3500 List 21
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2013-03-14 16:02:19
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  1. gainsay
    V. deny. She was too honest to gainsay the truth of the report.
  2. gait
    N. manner of walking or running; speed. The lame man walked with an uneven gait.
  3. galaxy
    N. large, isolated system of stars, such as the Milky Way; any collection of brilliant personalities. Science fiction stories speculate about the possible existence of life in other galaxies. The deaths of such famous actors as John Candy and George Burns tells us that the galaxy of Hollywood superstars is rapidly disappearing.
  4. gale
    N. windstorm; gust of wind; emotional outburst (laughter, tears). The Weather Channel warned viewers about a rising gale, with winds of up to sixty miles per hour.
  5. gall
    N. bitterness; nerve. The knowledge of his failure filled him with gall.
  6. gall
    V. annoy; chafe. Their taunts galled him.
  7. galleon
    N. large sailing ship. The Spaniards pinned their hopes on the galleon, the large warship; the British, on the smaller and faster pinnace.
  8. galvanize
    V. stimulate by shock; stir up; revitalize. News that the prince was almost at their door galvanized the ugly stepsisters into a frenzy of combing and primping.
  9. gambit
    N. opening in chess in which a piece is sacrificed. The player was afraid to accept his opponent's gambit because he feared a trap which as yet he could not see. gambol V. skip; leap playfully. Watching children gambol-ing in the park is a pleasant experience. also N.
  10. gamely
    ADV. bravely; with spirit. Because he had fought gamely against a much superior boxer, the crowd gave him a standing ovation when he left the arena.
  11. gamut
    N. entire range. In this performance, the leading lady was able to demonstrate the complete gamut of her acting ability.
  12. gape
    V. open widely; stare open-mouthed. The huge pit gaped before him; if he stumbled, he would fall in. Slackjawed in wonder, Huck gaped at the huge stalactites hanging down from the ceiling of the limestone cavern.
  13. garbled
    ADJ. mixed up; jumbled; distorted. A favorite party game involves passing a whispered message from one person to another until, by the time it reaches the last player, the message is totally garbled.
  14. gargantuan
    ADJ. huge; enormous. The gargantuan wrestler was terrified of mice.
  15. garish
    ADJ. over-bright in color; gaudy. She wore a gaudy rhinestone necklace with an excessively garish gold lame dress.
  16. garner
    V. gather; store up. She hoped to garner the world's literature in one library.
  17. garnish
    V. decorate. Parsley was used to garnish the boiled potato. also N.
  18. garrulous
    ADJ. loquacious; wordy; talkative. My Uncle Henry can out-talk any three people I know. He is the most garrulous person in Cayuga County. garrulity, N.
  19. gauche
    ADJ. clumsy; coarse and uncouth. Compared to the sophisticated young ladies in their elegant gowns, tomboyish Jo felt gauche and out of place.
  20. gaudy
    ADJ. flashy; showy. The newest Trump skyscraper is typically gaudy, covered in gilded panels that gleam in the sun.
  21. gaunt
    ADJ. lean and angular; barren. His once round face looked surprisingly gaunt after he had lost weight.
  22. gavel
    N. hammerlike tool; mallet. "Sold!" cried the auctioneer, banging her gavel on the table to indicate she'd accepted the final bid.
  23. gawk
    V. stare foolishly; look in open-mouthed awe. The country boy gawked at the skyscrapers and neon lights of the big city.
  24. genealogy
    N. record of descent; lineage. He was proud of his genealogy and constantly referred to the achievements of his ancestors.
  25. generality
    N. vague statement. This report is filled with generalities; be more specific in your statements.
  26. generate
    V. cause; produce; create. In his first days in office, President Clinton managed to generate a new mood of optimism; we just hoped he could generate some new jobs.
  27. generic
    ADJ. characteristic of an entire class or species. Sue knew so many computer programmers who spent their spare time playing fantasy games that she began to think that playing Dungeons & Dragons was a generic trait.
  28. genesis
    N. beginning; origin. Tracing the genesis of a family is the theme of Roots.
  29. geniality
    N. cheerfulness; kindliness; sympathy. This restaurant is famous and popular because of the geniality of the proprietor who tries to make everyone happy.
  30. genre
    N. particular variety of art or literature. Both a short story writer and a poet, Langston Hughes proved himself equally skilled in either genre.
  31. genteel
    ADJ. well-bred; elegant. We are looking for a man with a genteel appearance who can inspire confidence by his cultivated manner.
  32. gentility
    N. those of gentle birth; refinement. Her family was proud of its gentility and elegance.
  33. gentry
    N. people of standing; class of people just below nobility. The local gentry did not welcome the visits of the summer tourists and tried to ignore their presence in the community.
  34. germane
    ADJ. pertinent; bearing upon the case at hand. The judge refused to allow the testimony to be heard by the jury because it was not germane to the case.
  35. germinal
    ADJ. pertaining to a germ; creative. Such an idea is germinal, I am certain that it will influence thinkers and philosophers for many generations.
  36. germinate
    V. cause to sprout; sprout. After the seeds germinate and develop their permanent leaves, the plants may be removed from the cold frames and transplanted to the garden.
  37. gesticulation
    N. motion; gesture. Operatic performers are trained to make exaggerated gesticulations because of the large auditoriums in which they appear.
  38. ghastly
    ADJ. horrible. The murdered man was a ghastly sight.
  39. gibberish
    N. nonsense; babbling. Did you hear that fool boy spouting gibberish about monsters from outer space? gibber,V.
  40. gibe
    V. mock. As you gibe at their superstitious beliefs, do you realize that you, too, are guilty of similarly foolish thoughts?
  41. giddy
    ADJ. light-hearted; dizzy. He felt his giddy youth was past.
  42. gingerly
    ADV. very carefully. To separate egg whites, first crack the egg gingerly.
  43. girth
    N. distance around something; circumference. It took an extra-large cummerbund to fit around Andrew Carnegie's considerable girth.
  44. gist
    N. essence. She was asked to give the gist of the essay in two sentences.
  45. glacial
    ADJ. like a glacier; extremely cold. Never a warm person, when offended John could seem positively glacial.
  46. glaring
    ADJ. highly conspicuous; harshly bright. Glaring spelling or grammatical errors in your resume will unfavorably impress potential employers.
  47. glaze
    V. cover with a thin and shiny surface. The freezing rain glazed the streets and made driving hazardous. also N.
  48. glib
    ADJ. fluent; facile; slick. Keeping up a steady patter to entertain his customers, the kitchen gadget salesman was a glib speaker, never at a loss for a word.
  49. glimmer
    V. shine erratically; twinkle. In the darkness of the cavern, the glowworms hanging from the cavern roof glimmered like distant stars,
  50. gloat
    V. express evil satisfaction; view malevolently. As you gloat over your ill-gotten wealth, do you think of the many victims you have defrauded?
  51. glossary
    N. brief explanation of words used in the text. I have found the glossary in this book very useful; it has eliminated many trips to the dictionary.
  52. gloss over
    V. explain away. No matter how hard he tried to talk around the issue, President Bush could not gloss over the fact that he had raised taxes after all.
  53. glossy
    ADJ. smooth and shining. I want this photograph printed on glossy paper, not matte.
  54. glower
    V. scowl. The angry boy glowered at his father.
  55. glut
    V. overstock; fill to excess. The many manufacturers glutted the market and could not find purchasers for the excess articles they had produced. also N.
  56. glutton
    N. someone who eats too much. When Mother saw that Bobby had eaten all the cookies, she called him a little glutton. gluttonous,ADJ.
  57. gnarled
    ADJ. twisted. The gnarled oak tree had been a landmark for years and was mentioned in several deeds.
  58. gnome
    N. dwarf; underground spirit. In medieval mythology, gnomes were the special guardians and inhabitants of subterranean mines.
  59. goad
    V. urge on. He was goaded by his friends until he yielded to their wishes. also N.
  60. gorge
    N. small, steep-walled canyon. The white-water rafting guide warned us about the rapids farther downstream, where the river cut through a narrow gorge.
  61. gorge
    V. stuff oneself. The gluttonous guest gorged himself with food as though he had not eaten for days.
  62. gory
    ADJ. bloody. The audience shuddered as they listened to the details of the gory massacre.

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