Cleft Palate Test #2

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Author:
rchambers7
ID:
211408
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Cleft Palate Test #2
Updated:
2013-04-04 15:13:07
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Developmental periods types cleft incidence prevalence etiology
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Developmental periods, types of cleft, incidence and prevalence, etiology
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  1. At three weeks in utero, what primitive structures are present?
    prosencephalon (forebrain), stomadeum (primitive mouth), and the buccopharyngeal membrane (separates mouth from foregut)
  2. At four weeks in utero, what structures are present?
    Branchial ridges appear, and the buccopharyngeal membrane ruptures (then disappears)
  3. At five weeks in utero, what structures are present?
    The fontonasal processes (beginning to descend and differentiate), and the maxillary processes (progressing toward the midline)
  4. At nine weeks in utero, what structure is present?
    primary palate
  5. At ten weeks in utero, what structures are present?
    Mandible (expanding), tongue (dropping), and maxillary processes (lifting and proceeding to the midline)
  6. At six weeks in utero, what structures are present?
    Maxillary processes, and globular processes (which are converging at the midline)
  7. The 1st (mandibular) arch gives rise to what structures?
    • Maxillary processes
    • mandible
    • anterior portion of the tongue
    • muscles of mastication
    • malleus and incus of the middle ear
  8. The 2nd (Hyoid) arch gives rise to what structures?
    • lesser horns of the hyoid bine
    • facial muscles
    • styloid process
    • stapes of the ME
  9. The 3rd branchial arch gives rise to what structures?
    • remainder of the hyoid bone
    • nasopharynx
  10. The 4th branchial arch gives rise to what structures?
    • thyroid cartilege
    • laryngeal archers
  11. The 5th branchial arch gives rise to what structures?
    remainder of the larynx
  12. The geographical center of the primitive facial region is what structure?
    stomodeum
  13. The superior boundary of the primitive facial region is what structure?
    prosencephalon
  14. The inferior boundary of the primitive facial region is what structure?
    mandibular process
  15. The posterior boundary of the primitive facial region is what structure?
    buccopharyngeal membrane
  16. The roof of the nasal cavity is what structure?
    cribiform plate of the ethmoid bone
  17. The floor of the nasal cavity is what structure
    palatal processes of the maxillary and palatine bones
  18. The walls of the nasal cavity is what structure
    labyrinth of the ethmoid bone
  19. The roof of the oral cavity is what structure
    palatal processes of the maxillary and palatine bones
  20. The floor of the oral cavity is what structure
    none - no bony structure for the floor of the oral cavity
  21. The walls of the oral cavity is what structure
    • upper walls: maxillary bones
    • lower walls: mandible
  22. The ectoderm (outermost) layer contributes to which structures?
    • nervouse system
    • epidermis
    • epithelium of organs
    • mucous lining of the oral cavity
    • tooth enamel
    • lining of the EAM
  23. The mesoderm (middle connective) layer contributes to which structures?
    • cardiovascular system
    • blood
    • connective tissue
    • cartilege and bone
    • teeth (not enamel)
    • muscle
  24. The endoderm (innermost protective) layer contributes to which structures?
    • epithelium of lungs
    • digestive tract
    • eustacian tube & ME
  25. How is the primary palate formed?
    fusion of the median nasal processes -> median palatine process -> primary palate
  26. The primary palate gives rise to which structures?
    • lips
    • alveolar ridge
    • incisive foramen
  27. What are the boundaries of the primary palate?
    • Anterior: vermillion border
    • Posterior: incisive foramen
  28. A complete cleft of the primary palate can be described as?
    a cleft from the vermillion border to the incisive foramen
  29. A minimal cleft of the primary palate can be described as?
    just the vermillion border/microform cleft/submucous cleft/covert/occult
  30. A complete cleft of the primary palate causes the alar cartilege to flatten on which side?
    The side of the cleft
  31. A complete cleft of the primary palate causes the nose to deviate to which side?
    The non-cleft side
  32. A floating premaxilla can be the result of which type of cleft?
    a complet bilateral cleft of the primary palate
  33. Can an incomplete bilateral cleft cause a floating premaxilla?
    No, because it has one side to anchor itself to, which is enough
  34. How is the secondary palate formed?
    Via hardening of the palatine shelves and progression to the midline
  35. The secondary palate gives rise to which structures?
    • hard palate
    • soft palate
    • velum
  36. What are the boundaries of the secondary palate?
    • Anterior: incisive foramen
    • Posterior: Uvula
  37. A minimal cleft of the secondary palate can be described as?
    bifid uvula, submucous cleft, covert/occult
  38. The Triad of Symptoms for VPI and CPI are what?
    • Bifid uvula
    • Bony notch of the hard palate
    • Bluish median raphe
  39. What happens physiologically when there is a bilateral complete cleft of the secondary palate?
    • The palatal plates lift medially
    • the lateral nasal walls collapse medially towards the vomer bone
    • the vomer remains untouched and unattached
  40. What happens physiologically when there is a unilateral complete cleft of the secondary palate?
    • Forces exerted on cleft side cause that palatal plate to life medially
      Wall of the nasal cavity on the cleft side is collapsed toward that side (the midline)
    • Vomer is attached to the noncleft side and deviated to that side
  41. VPI or CPI inefficiency can be caused by what?
    A submucous cleft
  42. VPI and CPI inefficiency can be caused by 6 things. What are they?
    • 1. short hard palate
    • 2. Deep nasopharynx
    • 3. Palatal immobility
    • 4. Short soft palate
    • 5. Inconsistent palatal motion
    • 6. Ineffective palatal motion
  43. What is the incidence and prevalence of clefts?
    10% and 10%
  44. What is the rate of children born with CP or CL in general population?
    1:1000
  45. Why might overall rates of CP/CL have increased over time?
    • 1. awareness
    • 2. more pregnancies come to term
    • 3. more high risk infants survive
    • 4. surgical care is more advanced
  46. What is the sex difference for CP/Cl in males and females?
    • Cleft lips are 2x as frequent in males
    • Cleft palates are 2x as frequent in females
  47. What are some more
  48. What are some etiologies for CP/CL?
    • Radiation exposure
    • nutrition deficiency
    • RH incompatibility
    • Rubella
    • Mumps
    • Measles
  49. If neither parent has a cleft, what is the chances of their having a child with a cleft?
    1:1000 (general population)
  50. If neither parent has a cleft but they have a child with a cleft, what is the chance their second child will have a cleft?
    1:25, then 1:11 for the third child
  51. If one or both parents has a cleft, what is the chances of their having a child with a cleft?
    1:25, then 1:6 for the second child, and 1:6 for the rest
  52. Which syndrome has micrognathia, a U-shaped cleft of the secondary palate, glossoptosis, and respiratory and feeding problems?
    Pierre Robin Sequence (1:30,000)
  53. Which syndrome has antimongoloid slant to the eye, underdeveloped maxillary, extremely wide angle mouth, atresia of the external auditory cnal, cleft papate, VP inefficiency?
    Treacher Collins (Mandibulofacial Dysostosis, 1:50,000)

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