GREVocab12.txt

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mallett.designs
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21205
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GREVocab12.txt
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2010-05-29 18:06:03
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Vocab GRE
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  1. Anomaly
    NOUN

    • 1 : the angular distance of a planet from its perihelion as seen from the sun
    • 2 : deviation from the common rule : irregularity
    • 3 : something anomalous : something different, abnormal, peculiar, or not easily classified
  2. Assuage
    transitive verb

    from Latin ad- + suavis sweet — more at sweet


    • 1 : to lessen the intensity of (something that pains or distresses) : ease <unable to assuage their grief>
    • 2 : pacify, quiet <vainly strove…to assuage an implacable foe — Edward Gibbon>
    • 3 : to put an end to by satisfying : appease, quench <assuaging his thirst>

    synonyms:relieve
  3. Enigma
    noun

    Etymology: Latin aenigma, from Greek ainigmat-, ainigma, from ainissesthai to speak in riddles, from ainos fable

    • 1 : an obscure speech or writing
    • 2 : something hard to understand or explain
    • 3 : an inscrutable or mysterious person

    synonyms: mystery
  4. equivocal
    adjective

    Etymology: Late Latin aequivocus, from aequi- equi- + voc-, vox voice — more at voice

    • 1 a : subject to two or more interpretations and usually used to mislead or confuse <an equivocal statement>
    • b : uncertain as an indication or sign <equivocal evidence>
    • 2 a : of uncertain nature or classification <equivocal shapes>
    • b : of uncertain disposition toward a person or thing : undecided <an equivocal attitude>
    • c : of doubtful advantage, genuineness, or moral rectitude <equivocal behavior>


    synonyms: obscure
  5. erudite
    adjective

    Etymology: Middle English erudit, from Latin eruditus, from past participle of erudire to instruct, from e- + rudis rude, ignorant

    1) possessing or displaying erudition : learned <an erudite scholar>

    synonyms: knowledge
  6. fervid
    adjective

    Etymology: Latin fervidus, from fervēre

    • 1 : very hot : burning
    • 2 : marked by often extreme fervor <a fervid crusader>

    synonyms: impassioned
  7. lucid
    adjective

    Etymology: Latin lucidus, from lucēre

    • 1 a : suffused with light : luminous
    • b : translucent <snorkeling in the lucid sea>
    • 2 : having full use of one's faculties : sane
    • 3 : clear to the understanding : intelligible

    synonyms: clear
  8. opaque
    adjective

    Etymology: Latin opacus

    • 1 : exhibiting opacity : blocking the passage of radiant energy and especially light
    • 2 a : hard to understand or explain <opaque prose> b : obtuse, thickheaded
  9. placate
    transitive verb

    Etymology: Latin placatus, past participle of placare — more at please

    1) to soothe or mollify especially by concessions : appease
  10. precipitate
    verb

    Etymology: Latin praecipitatus, past participle of praecipitare, from praecipit-, praeceps

    transitive verb

    • 1 a : to throw violently : hurl <the quandaries into which the release of nuclear energy has precipitated mankind — A. B. Arons>
    • b : to throw down
    • 2 : to bring about especially abruptly <precipitate a scandal that would end with his expulsion — John Cheever>
    • 3 a : to cause to separate from solution or suspension
    • b : to cause (vapor) to condense and fall or depositintransitive

    verb

    • 1 a : to fall headlong
    • b : to fall or come suddenly into some condition
    • 2 : to move or act precipitately
    • 3 a : to separate from solution or suspension
    • b : to condense from a vapor and fall as rain or snow
  11. prodigal
    adjective

    Etymology: Latin prodigus, from prodigere to drive away, squander, from pro-, prod- forth + agere to drive — more at pro-, agent

    • 1 : characterized by profuse or wasteful expenditure : lavish <a prodigal feast> <prodigal outlays for her clothes>
    • 2 : recklessly spendthrift <the prodigal prince>
    • 3 : yielding abundantly : luxuriant —often used with of <nature has been so prodigal of her bounty — H. T. Buckle>

    synonyms: profuse
  12. zeal
    • noun
    • Etymology: Middle English zele, from Late Latin zelus, from Greek zēlos

    1) eagerness and ardent interest in pursuit of something : fervor <her zeal to succeed strained her relationships>

    synonyms: passion

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