Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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DesLee26
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214563
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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
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2013-04-21 06:53:17
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HON 122
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  1. Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human becaoned from his eye; something indeed which never found its way in to his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often adn loudly in the acts of his life.
    The very beginning of the story where they are describing Mr. Utterson. This passage demonstrates how he gets pleasure from seeing people doing misdeeds. When he's at friendly meetings, he's human.
  2. He was austere with himself, drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for 20 years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove.
    The very beginning of the story where they are describing Mr. Utterson. This passage demonstrates how he gets pleasure from seeing people doing misdeeds. When he's at friendly meetings, he's human.
  3. "I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way."
    • The very beginning of the story where they are describing Mr. Utterson. This passage demonstrates how he gets pleasure from seeing people doing misdeeds. When he's at friendly meetings, he's human. 
    • Mr. Utterson says this
  4. In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanor.
    The very beginning of the story where they are describing Mr. Utterson. This passage demonstrates how he gets pleasure from seeing people doing misdeeds. When he's at friendly meetings, he's human.
  5. "He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable  I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn't specify the point.
    • Mr. Enfield when he describes Hyde
    • This occurs after he tells the story of the girl who was trampled on by Hyde. He tells Mr. Utterson, who makes him promise not to speak of it again
  6. It was worse when it began to be clothed upon with detestable attributes; and out of the shifting, insubstantial mists that had so long baffled his eye, there leaped up the sudden, definite presentment of a fiend
    This occurred when Mr. Utterson was looking over the will of Dr. Jekyll. He analyzes it and is very iffy about it, especially where it says in the event htat Dr. Jekyll disappears. It confuses him so much and is disgraced by it
  7. he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation, he had a displeasing smile, he had brone himself to the lawyer with a sort of murderous mixture of timidity nad boldness, and he spoke with a husky, whispering and somewhat broken voice
    This occurs when Utterson meets Hyde for the first time. He waits until he gets to the house nad surprises him. Hyde is startled and says that Jekyll did not tell Utterson what he looked like
  8. If ever I read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend
    This is after meeting Hyde on the doorstep for the first time. He is disgusted, loathsome and fearful for Jekyll
  9. A maid servant living alone in a house not far from the river, had gone upstairs to bed about eleven. Although a fog rolled over hte city in the small hours, the early part of the night was cloudless, and the lane, which the maid's window overlooked, was brilliantly lit by the full moon
    this is the carew murder case description that occurs. Hyde clubbed a gentlemen to death. it was carew
  10. He came out of his seclusion, renewed relations with his friends, became once more their familiar guest and entertainer; and whilst he had always been known for charities, he was now no less distinguished for religion
    • This occurs after the death of Dr. Carew. Hyde 'disappears' and Utterson goes to visit Jekyll and asks about the will.
    • Later, the servant enters with a note. It is discovered that Hyde and Jekyll have the same handwriting.
    • This moment, however, is after this time.  Jekyll is happy and Utterson dines with him. Shortly after, he returns to periods of not being seen
  11. It is one thing to mortify curiousity, another to conquer it; and it may be doubted if, from that day forth, Utterson desired the society of his surviving friend with the same eagerness
    This occurs after Dr. Lanyon dies. Utterson receives a letter that is strictly for his eyes. The words were written by Lanyon. He greatly wanted to speak to Jekyll, but he was more confined than ever.
  12. The lawyer put it in his pocket. "I would say nothing o fhtis paper. If your master has fled or is dead, we may at least save his credit."
    At this point in time, they believe Jekyll is dead adn Hyde has killed him. Utterson visits the house of Jekyll, but it is said that Jekyll has locked himself in a cabinet and has demanded a drug. At this point, however, Hyde has killed himself and on the table was a will that they see has the name Hyde changed to Utterson. They also find a letter from Jekyll and he says that he will not say anything about this letter..
  13. This person (who had thus, from the first moment of his entrance, struck in me what I can only describe as a disgustful curiousity) was dressed in a fashion that would have made an ordinary person laughable
    This is Dr. Lanyon's description of Hyde in a letter that Utterson reads that details the events before he died. Lanyon received strict instructions from Jekyll about going to a cabinet, grabbing something, and waiting in his house for someone to come enter. When Hyde enters, this is his description of him
  14. "And now" said he, "to settle what remains. Will you be wise? will you be guided? will you suffer me to take this glass in my hand and to go forth from your house without further parley? or has the greed of curiousity too much command of you?
    Mr. Hyde has visited Dr. Lanyon at this point. He is anxious to see if Lanyon has the drawer that he has obtained. Dr. Lanyon asks to know o fhis acquaintance first. He shows Hyde the drawer, to which Hyde jumps to. Hyde then asks if he wants to see someething, and Dr. Lanyon witnesses Hyde transform into Jekyll. He then told him the story and ends by saying that he feels his days are numbered.
  15. Think before you answer for it shall be done as you decide. As you decide, you shall be left as you were before, and neither richer nor wiser, unless the sense of service rendered to a man in mortal distress may be counted as a kind o firches of the soul.
    Mr. Hyde has visited Dr. Lanyon at this point. He is anxious to see if Lanyon has the drawer that he has obtained. Dr. Lanyon asks to know o fhis acquaintance first. He shows Hyde the drawer, to which Hyde jumps to. Hyde then asks if he wants to see someething, and Dr. Lanyon witnesses Hyde transform into Jekyll. He then told him the story and ends by saying that he feels his days are numbered.
  16. Or, if you shall so prefer to choose, a new province of knowledge and new avenues to fame and power shall be laid open to you, here, in this room, upon the instant; and your sight shall be blasted by a prodigy to stagger the unbelief of Satan
    Mr. Hyde has visited Dr. Lanyon at this point. He is anxious to see if Lanyon has the drawer that he has obtained. Dr. Lanyon asks to know o fhis acquaintance first. He shows Hyde the drawer, to which Hyde jumps to. Hyde then asks if he wants to see someething, and Dr. Lanyon witnesses Hyde transform into Jekyll. He then told him the story and ends by saying that he feels his days are numbered.
  17. He  put the glass to his lips and drank at one gulp. A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring withi injected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked there came, I thought, a change--he seemed to swell--his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter--and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arm raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror
    This is when Mr. Hyde transforms into Jekyll directly before Lanyon's eyes. Lanyon calls it disgusted knowledge. He says he feels his days are numbered
  18. What he told me in the next hour, I cannot bring my mind to set on paper. I saw what I saw, I heard what I heard, and my soul sickened at it; and yet now when that sight had faded from my eyes, I asked myself if I believe it, and I cannot answer.
    This is when Mr. Hyde transforms into Jekyll directly before Lanyon's eyes. Lanyon calls it disgusted knowledge. He says he feels his days are numbered
  19. My life is shaken to its roots; sleep has left me; the deadliest terror sits by me at all hours of the day and night; I feel that my days are numbered, and that I must die; and yet I shall die incredulous. As for the moral turpitude that man unveiled to me, even with tears of penitence, I cannot even in moemory, dwell on it without a start of horror.
    This is when Mr. Hyde transforms into Jekyll directly before Lanyon's eyes. Lanyon calls it disgusted knowledge. He says he feels his days are numbered
  20. I will say but one thing, Utterson, and that (if you can bring your mind to credit it) will be more than enought. The creature who crept into my house that night was, on Jekyll's own confession, known by the name of Hyde and hunted for in every corner of hte land as the murderer of Carew.
    • This is when Mr. Hyde transforms into Jekyll directly before Lanyon's eyes. Lanyon calls it disgusted knowledge. He says he feels his days are numbered
    • the last section of his letter. Hyde tells him the whole story
  21. I stood alreaddy committed to a profound duplicity of life. Many a man would have even blazoned such irregularities as I was guilty of; but from the high views that I had set before me, I regarded and hid them with an amost morbid sense of shame.
    This occurs in Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. In this instance, he begins to talk about how he reached years of reflection and began to look around himself and reflect on his position in the world. He comes to the conclusion that man is constituted with both sides.
  22. Both sides of me were in dead earnest; I was no more myself when I laid aside restraint and plunged in shame, than when I laboured, in the eye of day, at the furtherance of knowledge or the relief of sorrow and suffering.
    This occurs in Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. In this instance, he begins to talk about how he reached years of reflection and began to look around himself and reflect on his position in the world. He comes to the conclusion that man is constituted with two sides.
  23. I thus drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two. I say two, because the state of my own knowledge does not pass beyond that point.
    This occurs in Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. In this instance, he begins to talk about how he reached years of reflection and began to look around himself and reflect on his position in the world. He comes to the conclusion that man is constituted with two sides: the duality of man. Shortly after, he puts his theory to test and creates Hyde.
  24. Others will follow, others will outstrip me on the same lines; and I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens. I for my part, from the nature of my life, advanced infallibly in one direction and in one direction only.
    This occurs in Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. In this instance, he begins to talk about how he reached years of reflection and began to look around himself and reflect on his position in the world. He comes to the conclusion that man is constituted with two sides: the duality of man. Shortly after, he puts his theory to test and creates Hyde.
  25. It was on the moral side, and in my own person, that I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man: i saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both
    This occurs in Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. In this instance, he begins to talk about how he reached years of reflection and began to look around himself and reflect on his position in the world. He comes to the conclusion that man is constituted with two sides: the duality of man. Shortly after, he puts his theory to test and creates Hyde.
  26. If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.
    This occurs in Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. In this instance, he begins to talk about how he reached years of reflection and began to look around himself and reflect on his position in the world. He comes to the conclusion that man is constituted with two sides: the duality of man. Shortly after, he puts his theory to test and creates Hyde.
  27. . I felt younger, lighter, happier in body; within I was conscious of a heady recklessness, a current of disordered sensual images running like a millrace in my fancy, a solution of the bonds of obligation, an unknown but not an innocent freedom of the soul.
    This occurs after Hyde is created. He creates a potion and uses himself as a guinea pig. Using a large amount of a particular salt he purchased, he felt very hard pangs as he was transforming. However, after, this is his description of how he feels. However, because there was no mirror, he cannot see how he looks. However, he feels more wicked.
  28. I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be more wicked, tenfold more wicked, sold a slave to my original evil; and the thought, in that moment, braced and delighted me like wine. I stretched out my hands, exulting in the freshness of these sensations; and in the act, I was suddenly aware that I had lost in stature.
    This occurs after Hyde is created. He creates a potion and uses himself as a guinea pig. Using a large amount of a particular salt he purchased, he felt very hard pangs as he was transforming. However, after, this is his description of how he feels. However, because there was no mirror, he cannot see how he looks. However, he feels more wicked and likes it
  29. Evil was written broadly and plainly on the face of the other. Evil besides (which I must still believe to be the lethal side of man) had left on that body an imprint of deformity and decay.
    evil showed deformity and decay on the face of hyde. After Hyde is created, Jekyll says he feels way more evil and. When he looks at the ugly idol, he was not disgusted at all.
  30. none could come near to me at first without a visible misgiving of the flesh. This, as I take it, was because all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil:
    This occurs after he creates Hyde. He sees deformity all over his body and doesn't mind it. BEcause noone would come near Hyde, he feels a sense of relief since he could now be alone. Shortly after this moment, he drinks the potion and is Jekyll again
  31. I had come forth an angel instead of a fiend.
    He says this after Hyde is created and he sees great evil on him. He, however, feels no repugnance. At this point, he even says that had he gone into the experiment with a purer aspiration, he would have come forth an angel
  32. And thus his conscience slumbered
    This occurs when Hyde's nature begins to display itself on the outside world. He is engaging in evil. However, Jekyll says that it was Hyde and Hyde only. As a result, he is safe. He says unlike people who have to hire others to deal their crimes, he was able to have a good reputation as Jekyll and then strip off his rep and do bad things as Hyde
  33. ome two months before the murder of Sir Danvers, I had been out for one of my adventures, had returned at a late hour, and woke the next day in bed with somewhat odd sensations. It was in vain I looked about me; in vain I saw the decent furniture and tall proportions of my room in the square; in vain that I recognised the pattern of the bed curtains and the design of the mahogany frame; something still kept insisting that I was not where I was, that I had not wakened where I seemed to be, but in the little room in Soho where I was accustomed to sleep in the body of Edward Hyde.
    he mentions this after speaking about how a crime he did against a child led to everyone being discontent with him. he relates how Hyde had to deal them a check and get his name out of it. He wakes up the next morning happy that he doesn't have to worry about anything only to discover that he has woken up as Hyde
  34. I smiled to myself, and in my psychological way, began lazily to inquire into the elements of this illusion, occasionally, even as I did so, dropping back into a comfortable morning doze. I was still so engaged when, in one of my more wakeful moments, my eyes fell upon my hand. Now the hand of Henry Jekyll (as you have often remarked) was professional in shape and size: it was large, firm, white and comely. But the hand which I now saw, clearly enough, in the yellow light of a mid-London morning, lying half shut on the bedclothes, was lean, corder, knuckly, of a dusky pallor and thickly shaded with a swart growth of hair. It was the hand of Edward Hyde
    he mentions this after speaking about how a crime he did against a child led to everyone being discontent with him. he relates how Hyde had to deal them a check and get his name out of it. He wakes up the next morning happy that he doesn't have to worry about anything only to discover that he has woken up as Hyde
  35. Between these two, I now felt I had to choose. My two natures had memory in common, but all other faculties were most unequally shared between them. Jekyll (who was composite) now with the most sensitive apprehensions, now with a greedy gusto, projected and shared in the pleasures and adventures of Hyde; but Hyde was indifferent to Jekyll, or but remembered him as the mountain bandit remembers the cavern in which he conceals himself from pursuit. Jekyll had more than a father's interest; Hyde had more than a son's indifference. To cast in my lot with Jekyll, was to die to those appetites which I had long secretly indulged and had of late begun to pamper.
    This occurs after he went to bed as Jekyll and woke up as Hyde. he is mortified. He has to go through Jekyll's house just to get the potion to return to his normal self. Everyone is mortified to see Hyde in his house. Hyde began to take over.
  36. To cast it in with Hyde, was to die to a thousand interests and aspirations, and to become, at a blow and forever, despised and friendless. The bargain might appear unequal; but there was still another consideration in the scales; for while Jekyll would suffer smartingly in the fires of abstinence, Hyde would be not even conscious of all that he had lost.
    `This occurs after he went to bed as Jekyll and woke up as Hyde. he is mortified. He has to go through Jekyll's house just to get the potion to return to his normal self. Everyone is mortified to see Hyde in his house. Hyde began to take over.
  37. Strange as my circumstances were, the terms of this debate are as old and commonplace as man; much the same inducements and alarms cast the die for any tempted and trembling sinner; and it fell out with me, as it falls with so vast a majority of my fellows, that I chose the better part and was found wanting in the strength to keep to it.
    `This occurs after he went to bed as Jekyll and woke up as Hyde. he is mortified. He has to go through Jekyll's house just to get the potion to return to his normal self. Everyone is mortified to see Hyde in his house. Hyde began to take over.
  38. That child of Hell had nothing human; nothing lived in him but fear and hatred
    He finally separates himself from Hyde as he says that "He--not I" did something. He says that Hyde was completely new to him. He had mastered his fury and Jekyll had sent letters to Lanyon and Poole. He then tells how he went to Lanoyon's and revealed himself to him. However, Lanyon's disgust affected him in some way
  39. These two base passions raged within him like a tempest
    He finally separates himself from Hyde as he says that "He--not I" did something. He says that Hyde was completely new to him. He had mastered his fury and Jekyll had sent letters to Lanyon and Poole. He then tells how he went to Lanoyon's and revealed himself to him. However, Lanyon's disgust affected him in some way
  40. Under the strain of this continually impending doom and by the sleeplessness to which I now condemned myself, ay, even beyond what I had thought possible to man, I became, in my own person, a creature eaten up and emptied by fever, languidly weak both in body and mind, and solely occupied by one thought: the horror of my other self
    This occurs in the cntext when his drug is causing him to turn into Hyde voluntarily. It has to constantly be administered over and over again. He says that what was dead coame to life, as in Hyde who had no poewr now has the greatest power over Jekyll. He says Jekyll would have ruined himself and so he killed himself to kill Hyde

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