MPT-Test1-Questions.txt

Card Set Information

Author:
SarahB
ID:
223495
Filename:
MPT-Test1-Questions.txt
Updated:
2013-06-11 21:56:22
Tags:
Modern Political Thought Test Review
Folders:

Description:
Modern Political Thought: Test 1 - Questions
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user SarahB on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. It is stated in our text (by Strauss) that Plato is “not a communist in the sense of Marx.” What does this mean?
    • Not like Marx: Does not want all to be equal and unable to own property.
    • Plato’s communism: wants to restrict owning property for the rulers/guardians/philosopher rulers (removes personal interest from their decision making).
  2. Discuss the parallelism between the city and the soul in Plato’s Republic.
    • Parallelism between the city and soul.
    • • Three stages
    • o City of pigs
    • ♣ Socrates definition is too basic/for pigs: only includes basic food, shelter, small amusements
    • o City of luxury
    • ♣ People want more than the bare minimum. Need luxuries to be satisfied. Socrates agrees.
    • ♣ Luxuries lead to envy and the need to protect our things ***armed camp***
    • o City of beauty
    • ♣ Socrates asks who do we trust/choose to guard our luxuries? We want the courageous & brave!
    • ♣ Must train who is good vs. bad & how to use the weapons
    • ♣ Requires education to determine who are friends and enemies.
    • ♣ Sometimes friends become enemies and vice versa. (ex: funding Al Qaeda to fight Russia in 80s, now our enemy.)
  3. Of what importance are the cardinal virtues in Plato?
    (1) Moderation, (2) Courage, (3) Wisdom, (4) Justice; Greek; virtues = excellence; wisdom = ability to admit when you know something & when you don’t.
  4. What are the three “waves” in the Republic?
    Socrates says there are three issues within society: (1) gender, (2) property (how should wealth be distributed, taxes, etc.), and (3) who should rule and why.
  5. Of what significance is the Divided Line in the Republic?
    Stages of cognition – Knowledge (intelligence, thinking) vs. opinion (belief, imagination)
  6. Of what significance is the Cave Allegory?
    Humans should take our ability to reason and understand seriously. Related to the Divided Line.
  7. Identify and discuss the significance of the declining forms in Plato.
    • • Aristocracy – love wisdom (top form, downgrades to Timocracy, etc.)
    • • Timocracy – love honors (value diploma/GPA, not education)
    • • Oligarchy – love money (value money over diploma over education)
    • • Democracy – love freedom (freedom over aiming at excellence)
    • • Tyranny – loves self, need to protect what we have, will vote for a Hitler
  8. What are Aristotle’s “forms” and how do they differ from Plato’s?
    • ARISTOTLE:
    • • Monarchy – rule of one in the interest of all (+)
    • • Aristocracy – rule of the few in the interest of all (+)
    • • Polity – rule of the many in the interest of all (+)
    • o Polity later changed to “republic”
    • • Tyranny – monarchy decays into this (George III & American Indep.)
    • • Oligarchy – aristocracy decays into this; few rule for their own interests
    • • Democracy – rule of the many in their own interests; polity decays into this
    • PLATO:
    • • Aristocracy – love wisdom (top form, downgrades to Timocracy, etc.)
    • • Timocracy – love honors (value diploma/GPA, not education)
    • • Oligarchy – love money (value money over diploma over education)
    • • Democracy – love freedom (freedom over aiming at excellence)
    • • Tyranny – loves self, need to protect what we have (will vote for a Hitler)
  9. Identify and discuss the significance of four “Aristotelian Basics.”
    • • Human beings are “political by nature”
    • • Human beings must be understood teleologically (in “mature” form)
    • • Human beings are the “speaking” creature
    • • Happiness is activity of the soul in accordance with virture “in a full life”
    • • Material, formal, efficient, final
    • • Virtues must be distinguished as intellectual and moral
    • • Moral virtues are developed by habit
    • • There are six types of regime
    • • The best practicable regime is polity
    • • Polities have mixed constitutions
  10. What is Stoicism?
    believe humans are defined by our ability for rationality; are engaged with the universe when using our mind; Zeno, Cicero, Marcus Orealious.
  11. Identify and discuss the significance of four basic teachings of the ancients (Greeks and Romans).
    Abolition of private property for rulers to be just, education in moderation and courage, cardinal virtues, justice, wisdom
  12. Identify and discuss the significance of three teachings of St. Augustine (either “political” or “theological”).
    • Peace and order are goals of government, not justice
    • History is not cyclical
    • Humans are fallen creatures
    • Pride is the root of sin
    • Evil is the absence of good
  13. What are the two cities in St. Augustine and why are they important?
    City of God and the earthly city – we all belong to the earthly city, and some belong to the City of God, but only God knows (attending church doesn’t automatically equal City of God).
  14. How did St. Augustine contribute to new thinking about history?
    Room for philosophy within Christianity
  15. Discuss St. Thomas Aquinas’s “types of law.”
    Eternal (God), Divine (Scripture), Natural (Eternal which humans understand), Human (created by humans)

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview