General Exam-FCC Rules

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rledwith
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General Exam-FCC Rules
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2013-07-06 08:56:48
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Amateur Radio General Exam - G1 Question Set - FCC Rules
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  1. G1A01 On which of the following bands is a General Class license holder granted all amateur frequency privileges?
    A. 60, 20, 17, and 12 meters
    B. 160, 80, 40, and 10 meters
    C. 160, 60, 30, 17, 12, and 10 meters
    D. 160, 30, 17, 15, 12, and 10 meters
    • (C) [97.301(d), 97.303(s)]
    • These are the bands on which the entire range of mode-restricted segments (such as phone or CW/data) are open to all license classes that have access to the band. Generals, Advanced, and Extra Class licensees all have access to the entire band.
  2. G1A02 On which of the following bands is phone operation prohibited?
    A. 160 meters
    B. 30 meters
    C. 17 meters
    D. 12 meters
    • (B) [97.305]
    • The 30 meter band is restricted to CW, RTTY and data transmissions only.
  3. G1A03 On which of the following bands is image transmission prohibited?
    A. 160 meters
    B. 30 meters
    C. 20 meters
    D. 12 meters
    • (B) [97.305]
    • The 30 meter band is restricted to CW, RTTY and data transmissions only. Image transmission is also prohibited on the 60 meter band.
  4. G1A04 Which of the following amateur bands is restricted to communication on only specific channels, rather than frequency ranges?
    A. 11 meters
    B. 12 meters
    C. 30 meters
    D. 60 meters
    • (D) [97.303 (s)]
    • In the US, Amateur Radio is a secondary service to government stations on 60 meters. By limiting amateur operation to specific channels, it is easier for hams to tell when government stations are present and to avoid interfering with them.
  5. G1A05 Which of the following frequencies is in the General Class portion of the 40 meter band?
    A. 7.250 MHz
    B. 7.500 MHz
    C. 40.200 MHz
    D. 40.500 MHz
    • (A) [97.301(d)]
    • General Class licensees have access to the following portions of the 40 meter band
    • (f = 300 / 40 = 7.5 MHz)
    • 7.025 - 7.125 MHz on CW/RTTY/data and from 7.175 - 7.300 MHz on CW/Phone/Image.
  6. G1A06 Which of the following frequencies is in the 12 meter band?
    A. 3.940 MHz
    B. 12.940 MHz
    C. 17.940 MHz
    D. 24.940 MHz
    • (D) [97.301(d)]
    • Use the formula f = 300 / 12 = 25 MHz to get the approximate frequency range of the 12 meter band.
  7. G1A07 Which of the following frequencies is within the General Class portion of the 75 meter phone band?
    A. 1875 kHz
    B. 3750 kHz
    C. 3900 kHz
    D. 4005 kHz
    • (C) [97.301(d)]
    • Although the 75 and 80 meter bands are part of a single amateur band, the difference in wavelength is enough for amateurs to make a distinction between 75 meters at the higher frequencies and 80 meters at the lower frequencies. General Class licensees have access to the following portions of the 75 meter band (f = 300 / 75 = 4.0 MHz): 3.800 - 4.000 MHz on CW/Phone/Image.
  8. G1A08 Which of the following frequencies is within the General Class portion of the 20 meter phone band?
    A. 14005 kHz
    B. 14105 kHz
    C. 14305 kHz
    D. 14405 kHz
    • (C) [97.301(d)]
    • General Class licensees have access to the following portions of the 20 meter band (f = 300 / 20 = 15 MHz): 14.025 - 14.150 MHz on CW/Phone/image and from 14.225 - 14.350 MHz on CW/Phone/Image.
  9. G1A09 Which of the following frequencies is within the General Class portion of the 80 meter band?
    A. 1855 kHz
    B. 2560 kHz
    C. 3560 kHz
    D. 3650 kHz
    • (C) [97.301(d)]
    • General Class licensees have access to the following portions of the 80 meter band (f = 300 / 80 = 3.75 MHz): 3.525 - 3.600 MHz on CW/RTTY/Data.
  10. G1A10 Which of the following frequencies is within the General Class portion of the 15 meter band?
    A. 14250 kHz
    B. 18155 kHz
    C. 21300 kHz
    D. 24900 kHz
    • (C) [97.301(d)]
    • General Class licensees have access to the following portions of the 15 meter band (f = 300 / 15 = 20 MHz): 21.025 - 21.200 MHz on CW/RTTY/data and from 21.275 - 21.450 MHz on CW/Phone/Image.
  11. G1A11 Which of the following frequencies is available to a control operator holding a General Class license?
    A. 28.020 MHz
    B. 28.350 MHz
    C. 28.550 MHz
    D. All of these choices are correct
    • (D) [97.301(d)]
    • The 28 MHz (10 meter) band is one of the bands on which the entire range of mode-restricted segments (such as phone or CW/data) are open to all license classes that have access to the band. Generals, Advanced, and Extra Class licensees all have access to the entire band.
  12. G1A12 When General Class licensees are not permitted to use the entire voice portion of a particular band, which portion of the voice segment is generally available to them?
    A. The lower frequency end
    B. The upper frequency end
    C. The lower frequency end on frequencies below 7.3 MHz and the upper end on frequencies above 14.150 MHz
    D. The upper frequency end on frequencies below 7.3 MHz and the lower end on frequencies above 14.150 MHz
    • (B) [97.301]
    • If you look at the US Amateur Band chart available in the General Class License Manual or on the ARRL Web site at www.arrl.org/files/file/Hambands_color.pdf you will see that in the bands on which there are mode-restricted segments, such as 80 meters, General Class licensees have access to the higher frequencies of the segment.
  13. G1A13 Which, if any, amateur band is shared with the Citizens Radio Service?
    A. 10 meters
    B. 12 meters
    C. 15 meters
    D. None
    • (D) [97.303]
    • Citizens Band operators may not operate on amateur bands or on any frequency not assigned to the Citizens Radio Service.
  14. G1A14 Which of the following applies when the FCC rules designate the Amateur Service as a secondary user on a band?
    A. Amateur stations must record the call sign of the primary service station before operating on a frequency assigned to that station
    B. Amateur stations are allowed to use the band only during emergencies
    C. Amateur stations are allowed to use the band only if they do not cause harmful interference to primary users
    D. Amateur stations may only operate during specific hours of the day, while primary users are permitted 24 hour use of the band
    • (C) [97.303]
    • You should always listen before you transmit. This is especially important on bands where Amateur Radio is a secondary service, such as the 30 or 60 meter band. Amateurs are only permitted to use these frequencies if they do not cause harmful interference to the primary users. If you hear a station in the primary service or receive interference from such a station you should immediately change frequencies. Otherwise you might be causing interference to the primary station.
  15. G1A15 What is the appropriate action if, when operating on either the 30 or 60 meter bands, a station in the primary service interferes with your contact?
    A. Notify the FCC's regional Engineer in Charge of the interference
    B. Increase your transmitter's power to overcome the interference
    C. Attempt to contact the station and request that it stop the interference
    D. Move to a clear frequency
    • (D) [97.303]
    • You should always listen before you transmit. This is especially important on bands where Amateur Radio is a secondary service, such as the 30 or 60 meter band. Amateurs are only permitted to use these frequencies if they do not cause harmful interference to the primary users. If you hear a station in the primary service or receive interference from such a station you should immediately change frequencies. Otherwise you might be causing interference to the primary station.
  16. G1B01 What is the maximum height above ground to which an antenna structure may be erected without requiring notification to the FAA and registration with the FCC, provided it is not at or near a public use airport?
    A. 50 feet
    B. 100 feet
    C. 200 feet
    D. 300 feet
    • (C) [97.15(a)]
    • FCC regulations require approval if your antenna would be more than 200 feet above ground level at its site. This includes the antenna, the supports and anything else attached to the structure. (Additional FCC restrictions apply if the antenna is within about 4 miles of a public use airport or heliport.)
  17. G1B02 With which of the following conditions must beacon stations comply?
    A. A beacon station may not use automatic control
    B. The frequency must be coordinated with the National Beacon Organization
    C. The frequency must be posted on the Internet or published in a national periodical
    D. There must be no more than one beacon signal in the same band from a single location
    • (D) [97.203(b)]
    • A beacon station normally transmits a signal for operators to observe propagation and reception characteristics. For this purpose, FCC rules specifically allow an amateur beacon to transmit one-way communications.
  18. G1B03 Which of the following is a purpose of a beacon station as identified in the FCC Rules?
    A. Observation of propagation and reception
    B. Automatic identification of repeaters
    C. Transmission of bulletins of general interest to Amateur Radio licensees
    D. Identifying net frequencies
    • (A) [97.3(a)(9)]
    • A beacon station normally transmits a signal for operators to observe propagation and reception characteristics. For this purpose, FCC rules specifically allow an amateur beacon to transmit one-way communications.
  19. G1B04 Which of the following must be true before amateur stations may provide communications to broadcasters for dissemination to the public?
    A. The communications must directly relate to the immediate safety of human life or protection of property and there must be no other means of communication reasonably available before or at the time of the event
    B. The communications must be approved by a local emergency preparedness official and conducted on officially designated frequencies
    C. The FCC must have declared a state of emergency
    D. All of these choices are correct
    • (A) [97.113(b)]
    • Amateurs are not allowed to be involved with any activity related to program production or news gathering for broadcasting to the general public unless it is directly related to an emergency involving an immediate life or property-threatening situation and there is no other method by which the information can be transmitted. If there is an alternative communication system available, even if it is slower, the amateur station may not transmit the information for a news broadcast or related program production.
  20. G1B05 When may music be transmitted by an amateur station?
    A. At any time, as long as it produces no spurious emissions
    B. When it is unintentionally transmitted from the background at the transmitter
    C. When it is transmitted on frequencies above 1215 MHz
    D. When it is an incidental part of a manned space craft retransmission
    • (D)  [97.113(a)(5), 97.113(e)]
    • Normally, music may not be transmitted by an amateur station. This is to avoid infringing upon commercial broadcast activities. Music is often used in communications between ground control and the space shuttle or International Space Station (ISS) for such things as waking up the astronauts in the morning. In this case, since it is an incidental part of the transmission and not the primary purpose of it, the music can be retransmitted by the amateur station along with the rest of the space shuttle transmission, as long as the Amateur station has NASA’s permission to retransmit the Shuttle (or ISS) audio.
  21. G1B06 When is an amateur station permitted to transmit secret codes?
    A. During a declared communications emergency
    B. To control a space station
    C. Only when the information is of a routine, personal nature
    D. Only with Special Temporary Authorization from the FCC
    • (B) [97.113(a)(4) and 97.207(f)]
    • An amateur station may never transmit in such a manner as to obscure the meaning of two-way communication. The use of standard abbreviations does not violate this rule, since their meaning is well known. The exception is space telecommand operations where the commands and data may be coded. (This helps prevent unauthorized stations from transmitting telecommand messages to the spacecraft.) When controlling a satellite from a ground station, the transmissions may consist of specially coded messages intended to facilitate communications or related to the function of the spacecraft. Telecommand is not two-way communication, however; it is one-way communication.
  22. G1B07 What are the restrictions on the use of abbreviations or procedural signals in the Amateur Service?
    A. Only "Q" codes are permitted
    B. They may be used if they do not obscure the meaning of a message
    C. They are not permitted
    D. Only "10 codes" are permitted
    • (B) [97.113(a)(4)]
    • The use of common abbreviations and procedural signals is standard practice and does not obscure the meaning of a message because their meaning is well known. Any use of abbreviations or codes for the purpose of obscuring the meaning of a communication is prohibited.
  23. G1B08 When choosing a transmitting frequency, what should you do to comply with good amateur practice?
    A. Review FCC Part 97 Rules regarding permitted frequencies and emissions.
    B. Follow generally accepted band plans agreed to by the Amateur Radio community.
    C. Before transmitting, listen to avoid interfering with ongoing communication
    D. All of these choices are correct
    • (D)
    • Choosing a frequency is straightforward: Be sure the frequency is authorized to General class licensees, follow the band plan under normal circumstances, and listen to the frequency to avoid interfering with ongoing communications.
  24. G1B09 When may an amateur station transmit communications in which the licensee or control operator has a pecuniary (monetary) interest?
    A. When other amateurs are being notified of the sale of apparatus normally used in an amateur station and such activity is not done on a regular basis
    B. Only when there is no other means of communications readily available
    C. When other amateurs are being notified of the sale of any item with a monetary value less than $200 and such activity is not done on a regular basis
    D. Never
    • (A) [97.113(a)(3)]
    • In general, amateurs are forbidden to receive any kind of compensation, financial or otherwise, for conducting communications on amateur frequencies. Amateurs are, however, permitted to conduct a limited amount of personal business, such as participating in “swap-and-shop” nets conducted on amateur frequencies for local amateurs to buy, sell and trade amateur equipment.
  25. G1B10 What is the power limit for beacon stations?
    A. 10 watts PEP output
    B. 20 watts PEP output
    C. 100 watts PEP output
    D. 200 watts PEP output
    • (C) [97.203(c)]
    • 100 watts of output power is a good compromise, enabling a beacon station to transmit a signal strong enough to be heard when propagation isn’t the best. Similarly, when propagation is good, a 100-watt signal is not so strong as to cause interference to stations on nearby frequencies.
  26. G1B11 How does the FCC require an amateur station to be operated in all respects not specifically covered by the Part 97 rules?
    A. In conformance with the rules of the IARU
    B. In conformance with Amateur Radio custom
    C. In conformance with good engineering and good amateur practice
    D. All of these choices are correct
    • (C) [97.101(a)]
    • The FCC Rules grant amateurs a lot freedom in the ways they choose to operate, more than in any other service. It is impossible for the service’s broad rules and regulations to cover every situation that might possibly arise. You are expected to use common sense in those situations where an exact rule does not apply. Your station and its operation should always follow good engineering design and good amateur practice.
  27. G1B12 Who or what determines “good engineering and good amateur practice” as applied to the operation of an amateur station in all respects not covered by the Part 97 rules?
    A. The FCC
    B. The Control Operator
    C. The IEEE
    D. The ITU
    • (A) [97.101(a)][97.101(a)]
    • The FCC does not publish a list of what constitutes “good engineering and good amateur practice” because the state of the radio art is continually improving. Nevertheless, when questions arise, the FCC is the agency that determines what standards should be applied.
  28. G1C01 What is the maximum transmitting power an amateur station may use on 10.140 MHz?
    A. 200 watts PEP output
    B. 1000 watts PEP output
    C. 1500 watts PEP output
    D. 2000 watts PEP output
    • (A) [97.313(c)(1)]
    • The general rule is that maximum power is limited to 1500 watts PEP output, although there are exceptions where less power is allowed. One such exception is the 30 meter band, 10.100 - 10.150 MHz, where the maximum power for US hams is 200 watts. (These frequencies are just above the short-wave time broadcasts of WWV and WWVH at 10.0 MHz.)
  29. G1C02 What is the maximum transmitting power an amateur station may use on the 12 meter band?
    A. 1500 PEP output, except for 200 watts PEP output in the Novice portion
    B. 200 watts PEP output
    C. 1500 watts PEP output
    D. An effective radiated power equivalent to 50 watts from a half-wave dipole
    • (C) [97.313(a),(b)]
    • The maximum power allowed is 1500 watts PEP output from 24.890 - 24.990 MHz.
  30. G1C03 What is the maximum bandwidth permitted by FCC rules for Amateur Radio stations when transmitting on USB frequencies in the 60 meter band?
    A. 2.8 kHz
    B. 5.6 kHz
    C. 1.8 kHz
    D. 3 kHz
    • (A) [97.303s]
    • The FCC Rules for operating on the amateur 60 meter band tell us that “Amateur stations must ensure that their transmission occupies only the 2.8 kHz centered around each” of the operating channels. So the maximum transmitted bandwidth of your upper sideband signal (the only operating mode allowed on this band) is 2.8 kHz. A properly adjusted SSB transmitter normally has a bandwidth of 2.5 to 2.8 kHz.
  31. G1C04 Which of the following is a limitation on transmitter power on the 14 MHz band?
    A. Only the minimum power necessary to carry out the desired communications should be used
    B. Power must be limited to 200 watts when transmitting between 14.100 MHz and 14.150 MHz
    C. Power should be limited as necessary to avoid interference to another radio service on the frequency
    D. Effective radiated power cannot exceed 3000 watts
    • (A) [97.313]
    • Although the maximum power allowed is 1500 watts PEP output, amateurs should use only the power level needed to carry out communications.
  32. G1C05 Which of the following is a limitation on transmitter power on the 28 MHz band?
    A. 100 watts PEP output
    B. 1000 watts PEP output
    C. 1500 watts PEP output
    D. 2000 watts PEP output
    • (C) [97.313]
    • The maximum power allowed is 1500 watts PEP output on the entire band.
  33. G1C06 Which of the following is a limitation on transmitter power on 1.8 MHz band?
    A. 200 watts PEP output
    B. 1000 watts PEP output
    C. 1200 watts PEP output
    D. 1500 watts PEP output
    • (D) [97.313]
    • The maximum power allowed is 1500 watts PEP output on the entire band.
  34. G1C07 What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmission on the 20 meter band?
    A. 56 kilobaud
    B. 19.6 kilobaud
    C. 1200 baud
    D. 300 baud
    • (D) [97.305(c), 97.307(f)(3)]
    • The symbol rate of digital signals is restricted to make sure they do not consume too much bandwidth at the expense of other modes. Table G1-1 shows the limits by band.
  35. G1C08 What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmitted at frequencies below 28 MHz?
    A. 56 kilobaud
    B. 19.6 kilobaud
    C. 1200 baud
    D. 300 baud
    • (D) [97.307(f)(3)]
    • The symbol rate of digital signals is restricted to make sure they do not consume too much bandwidth at the expense of other modes. Table G1-1 shows the limits by band.
  36. G1C09 What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmitted on the 1.25 meter and 70 centimeter bands
    A. 56 kilobaud
    B. 19.6 kilobaud
    C. 1200 baud
    D. 300 baud
    • (A) [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(5)]
    • The symbol rate of digital signals is restricted to make sure they do not consume too much bandwidth at the expense of other modes. Table G1-1 shows the limits by band.
  37. G1C10 What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmissions on the 10 meter band?
    A. 56 kilobaud
    B. 19.6 kilobaud
    C. 1200 baud
    D. 300 baud
    • (C) [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(4)]
    • The symbol rate of digital signals is restricted to make sure they do not consume too much bandwidth at the expense of other modes. Table G1-1 shows the limits by band.
  38. G1C11 What is the maximum symbol rate permitted for RTTY or data emission transmissions on the 2 meter band?
    A. 56 kilobaud
    B. 19.6 kilobaud
    C. 1200 baud
    D. 300 baud
    • (B) [97.305(c) and 97.307(f)(5)]
    • The symbol rate of digital signals is restricted to make sure they do not consume too much bandwidth at the expense of other modes. Table G1-1 shows the limits by band.
  39. G1D01 Which of the following is a proper way to identify when transmitting using phone on General Class frequencies if you have a CSCE for the required elements but your upgrade from Technician has not appeared in the FCC database?
    A. Give your call sign followed by the words "General Class"
    B. No special identification is needed
    C. Give your call sign followed by "slant AG"
    D. Give your call sign followed the abbreviation “CSCE”
    • (C) [97.119(f)(2)]
    • You must add a “temporary identifier” to your call sign so that stations receiving your transmissions can verify that you are authorized to transmit on that frequency. If a temporary identifier was not used between the time you pass your exam and the time at which your new privileges appear in the FCC database, it would appear that you were transmitting on a frequency for which you were not authorized. When you upgrade to Extra class, you’ll append “temporary AE” to your call sign.
  40. G1D02 What license examinations may you administer when you are an accredited VE holding a General Class operator license?
    A. General and Technician
    B. General only
    C. Technician only
    D. Extra, General and Technician
    • (C) [97.509(b)(3)(i)]
    • Holders of a General class operator license may only administer examinations for license levels below theirs: Technician. General class licensees may participate as a VE in any exam session, but they may not be the primary VEs administrating the General or Extra class exams.
  41. G1D03 On which of the following band segments may you operate if you are a Technician Class operator and have a CSCE for General Class privileges?
    A. Only the Technician band segments until your upgrade is posted on the FCC database
    B. Only on the Technician band segments until your license arrives in the mail
    C. On any General or Technician Class band segment
    D. On any General or Technician Class band segment except 30 and 60 meters
    • (C) [97.9(b)]
    • You may begin using the General class privileges immediately on receiving your CSCE, but you must append the identifier "temporary AG" or "/AG" to indicate that you passed the General class exam.
  42. G1D04 Which of the following is a requirement for administering a Technician Class operator examination?
    A. At least three VEC accredited General Class or higher VEs must be present
    B. At least two VEC accredited General Class or higher VEs must be present
    C. At least two General Class or higher VEs must be present, but only one need be VEC accredited
    D. At least three VEs of Technician Class or higher must be present
    • (A) [97.509(a), 97.509(b)]
    • All license exams are administered through the Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) system. VEs (Volunteer Examiners) must be accredited by a VEC. There must be three VEC-accredited VEs present at every exam session. Technician exams are administered by General class or higher VEs.
  43. G1D05 Which of the following is sufficient for you to be an administering VE for a Technician Class operator license examination?
    A. Notification to the FCC that you want to give an examination
    B. Receipt of a CSCE for General Class
    C. Possession of a properly obtained telegraphy license
    D. An FCC General Class or higher license and VEC accreditation
    • (D) [97.509(b)(3)(i)]
    • All license exams are administered through the Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) system. VEs (Volunteer Examiners) must be accredited by a VEC. There must be three VEC-accredited VEs present at every exam session. Technician exams are administered by General class or higher VEs. As soon as the FCC issues your General class license (meaning that it has appeared in the FCC database) and you receive your accreditation from a VEC, you can participate in exam sessions for Technician license exams.
  44. G1D06 When must you add the special identifier "AG" after your call sign if you are a Technician Class licensee and have a CSCE for General Class operator privileges, but the FCC has not yet posted your upgrade on its Web site?
    A. Whenever you operate using General Class frequency privileges
    B. Whenever you operate on any amateur frequency
    C. Whenever you operate using Technician frequency privileges
    D. A special identifier is not required as long as your General Class license application has been filed with the FCC
    • (A) [97.119(f)(2)]
    • You must add a “temporary identifier” to your call sign so that stations receiving your transmissions can verify that you are authorized to transmit on that frequency. If a temporary identifier was not used, between the time you pass your exam and the time at which your new privileges appear in the FCC data base, it would appear that you were transmitting on a frequency for which you were not authorized. When you upgrade to Extra class, you’ll append “temporary AE” to your call sign.
  45. G1D07 Volunteer Examiners are accredited by what organization?
    A. The Federal Communications Commission
    B. The Universal Licensing System
    C. A Volunteer Examiner Coordinator
    D. The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
    • (C) [97.509(b)(1)]
    • A Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) organization is responsible for certifying Volunteer Examiners and evaluating the results of all exam sessions administered by them. VECs also process all of the license application paperwork and submit it to the FCC.
  46. G1D08 Which of the following criteria must be met for a non-U.S. citizen to be an accredited Volunteer Examiner?
    A. The person must be a resident of the U.S. for a minimum of 5 years
    B. The person must hold an FCC granted Amateur Radio license of General Class or above
    C. The person’s home citizenship must be in the ITU 2 region
    D. None of these choices is correct; non-U.S. citizens cannot be volunteer examiners
    • (B) [97.509(b)(3)]
    • A VE’s citizenship does not matter, only whether the individual has demonstrated adequate knowledge of the US Amateur Service rules by passing the appropriate license exams.
  47. G1D09 How long is a Certificate of Successful Completion of Examination (CSCE) valid for exam element credit?
    A. 30 days
    B. 180 days
    C. 365 days
    D. For as long as your current license is valid
    • (C) [97.9(b)]
    • Although your new license class should appear in the FCC database within a few days of passing your examination, should there be a delay, remember that the CSCE is only good for 365 days. After that time, you’ll have to re-take the examination!
  48. G1D10 What is the minimum age that one must be to qualify as an accredited Volunteer Examiner?
    A. 12 years
    B. 18 years
    C. 21 years
    D. There is no age limit
    • (B) [97.509(b)(2)]
    • 18 years old was determined to be an appropriate age to properly manage an amateur examination session.
  49. G1E01 Which of the following would disqualify a third party from participating in stating a message over an amateur station?
    A. The third party’s amateur license had ever been revoked
    B. The third party is not a U.S. citizen
    C. The third party is a licensed amateur
    D. The third party is speaking in a language other than English, French, or Spanish
    • (A) [97.115(b)(2)]
    • Third-party communication is available to anyone except someone with a revoked amateur license from any country. This prevents someone whose ability to make use of Amateur Radio was taken away from regaining access to amateur frequencies under the guise of third party communications.
  50. G1E02 When may a 10 meter repeater retransmit the 2 meter signal from a station having a Technician Class control operator?
    A. Under no circumstances
    B. Only if the station on 10 meters is operating under a Special Temporary Authorization allowing such retransmission
    C. Only during an FCC declared general state of communications emergency
    D. Only if the 10 meter repeater control operator holds at least a General Class license
    • (D) [97.205(a)]
    • FCC rules allow any holder of an amateur license to be the control operator of a repeater. The control operator of the repeater must have privileges on the frequency on which the repeater is transmitting, however. A 10 meter repeater must have a General class or higher control operator because Technician and Novice licensees don’t have privileges on the 10 meter repeater band. A 10 meter repeater may retransmit the 2 meter signal from a Technician class operator because the 10 meter control operator holds at least a General class license. (Of course the operator transmitting to the repeater must have privileges on the frequency on which he or she is transmitting.)
  51. G1E03 In what ITU region is operation in the 7.175 to 7.300 MHz band permitted for a control operator holding an FCC-issued General Class license?
    A. Region 1
    B. Region 2
    C. Region 3
    D. All three regions
    • (B) [97.301(d)]
    • Amateur allocations vary between the different ITU regions of the world. FCC Rule 97.301 contains a complete listing of allocations for U.S. hams. Parts (a) and (d) of that section contain the Region 2 frequency allocations that apply to General class amateurs operating from the US.
  52. G1E04 Which of the following conditions require an Amateur Radio station licensee to take specific steps to avoid harmful interference to other users or facilities?
    A. When operating within one mile of an FCC Monitoring Station
    B. When using a band where the Amateur Service is secondary
    C. When a station is transmitting spread spectrum emissions
    D. All of these choices are correct
    • (D)  [97.13(b), 97.311(b), 97.303]
    • Aside from the general requirement to avoid causing harmful interference to other licensed stations and primary service licensees, there are several specific instances in which amateurs must take extra steps to avoid interference. FCC Monitoring Stations require an environment free of strong or spurious signals that can cause interference. The location of monitoring stations can be determined from a regional FCC office. Spread spectrum (SS) transmissions, because of their nature, have the potential to interfere with fixed frequency stations, so SS users should be sure their transmissions will not cause interference.
  53. G1E05 What types of messages for a third party in another country may be transmitted by an amateur station?
    A. Any message, as long as the amateur operator is not paid
    B. Only messages for other licensed amateurs
    C. Only messages relating to Amateur Radio or remarks of a personal character, or messages relating to emergencies or disaster relief
    D. Any messages, as long as the text of the message is recorded in the station log
    • (C) [97.115(a)(2),97.117]
    • The FCC and other licensing authorities want to be very sure that the Amateur Service is not abused to provide communications that should properly be conducted through commercial or government services. As a result, third-party communication is restricted to the types of messages in answer C.
  54. G1E06 Which of the following applies in the event of interference between a coordinated repeater and an uncoordinated repeater?
    A. The licensee of the non-coordinated repeater has primary responsibility to resolve the interference
    B. The licensee of the coordinated repeater has primary responsibility to resolve the interference
    C. Both repeater licensees share equal responsibility to resolve the interference
    D. The frequency coordinator bears primary responsibility to resolve the interference
    • (A) [97.205(c)]
    • The FCC considers repeater frequency coordination to be “good engineering and amateur practice.” As such, amateurs are expected to use frequency coordination methods whenever the potential for interference exists. As a consequence, the burden of resolving interference between a coordinated and non-coordinated repeater system falls on the operator of the non-coordinated system.
  55. G1E07 With which foreign countries is third party traffic prohibited, except for messages directly involving emergencies or disaster relief communications?
    A. Countries in ITU Region 2
    B. Countries in ITU Region 1
    C. Every foreign country, unless there is a third party agreement in effect with that country
    D. Any country which is not a member of the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)
    • (C) [97.115(a)(2)]
    • The general rule is that third-party traffic with amateurs in any country outside the US is prohibited unless specifically permitted by a third-party agreement between the United States and that country. Don’t assume that it is permitted. Check Table G1-2 which lists countries having third-party agreements with the United States. If the country is not listed, you may not exchange third-party traffic with amateurs operating in that country
  56. G1E08 Which of the following is a requirement for a non-licensed person to communicate with a foreign Amateur Radio station from a station with an FCC granted license at which a licensed control operator is present?
    A. Information must be exchanged in English
    B. The foreign amateur station must be in a country with which the United States has a third party agreement
    C. The control operator must have at least a General Class license
    D. All of these choices are correct
    • (B) [97.115(a)(b)]
    • The non-licensed person is, by definition, a third-party and any messages you allow them to send or send on their behalf are third-party traffic. The non-licensed person can not have had an amateur license revoked as discussed in question G1E01.
  57. G1E09 What language must you use when identifying your station if you are using a language other than English in making a contact using phone emission?
    A. The language being used for the contact
    B. Any language if the US has a third party agreement with that country
    C. English
    D. Any language of a country that is a member of the ITU
    • (C) [97.119(b)(2)]
    • Identification by all US-licensed stations when using phone transmissions must be performed in English.
  58. G1E10 What portion of the 10 meter band is available for repeater use?
    A. The entire band
    B. The portion between 28.1 MHz and 28.2 MHz
    C. The portion between 28.3 MHz and 28.5 MHz
    D. The portion above 29.5 MHz
    • (D) [97.205(b)]
    • The only HF authorization for repeater stations is on the 10 meter band between 29.5 and 29.7 MHz.

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