Canine and Feline week 2

Card Set Information

Author:
rpanek
ID:
235517
Filename:
Canine and Feline week 2
Updated:
2013-09-18 00:01:52
Tags:
vet tech
Folders:

Description:
Canine and Feline management
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user rpanek on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. the development process of a disease is called
    pathogenesis
  2. a harmful trigger that causes loss of health/disease
    an etiological agent
  3. what are the 7 etiologies
    • protozoa (one cell)
    • fungus (mold,yeast)
    • bacteria (coccus, bacillus, spirillum)
    • rickettsiae (arthropods as vectors)
    • chlamydiae (not understood)
    • mycoplasmas (smallest free living)
    • viruses (either DNA or RNA)
  4. what are 3 internal etiological factors
    • genetic - defect or mutation of the genome
    • immune system - defect of response
    • aging - natural process of aging
  5. what are 4 external etiological factors
    • physical - trauma, pressure,
    • chemical - toxins, poisons, heavy metals
    • infections - parasites, bacteria, viruses, fungi
    • envioronmental - nutrition, temperature, radiation, hygiene
  6. what are 6 causes/types of disease
    • hereditary - gene carriers
    • congenital diseases - pregnancy
    • deficiency diseases - inability to digest
    • physical trauma - lacerations
    • poison diseases - toxins interfering
    • metazoan diseases - multicellular/unicellular
  7. 5 host factors that influence dogs and cats to contract infectious diseases
    • developmental anomalies of the immune system
    • maternal immunity
    • age at the time of exposure
    • concurrent illness
    • nutrition
  8. 5 enviornmental factors that influence dogs and cats to contract infectious diseases
    • population density
    • sanitation
    • ventilation
    • accumulation of excretion
    • animal movement from population
  9. 3 most important agent factors to contract diseases
    • virulence
    • dosage
    • route of inoculation
  10. 5 principals of control
    • vaccination programs
    • clinical signs
    • identify asymptomatic carriers
    • isolate young animals
    • prioritize cleanliness (sanitation/ventilation)
  11. 5 control factors for shelters
    • temperature - 72 degrees
    • humidity - 40 - 60%
    • air exchanges - 17/hour or 12/hr
    • light cycle - 14 light/10 dark
    • bleach - kill parvo and other non enveloped viruses.
  12. what is the chemical name for bleach
    sodium hypochlorite
  13. what is the bleach solution to kill parvo and other viruses
    1 part bleach and 30 parts water
  14. 2 types of vaccines
    • parenteral
    • intranasal
  15. what are the two purposes for vaccination
    • protect and treat the individual
    • heard immunity
  16. 2 reasons vaccination of animals has contributed to improvement of human health
    • improve efficiency of food animal production
    • preventing the spread of zoonotic diseases (rabies)
  17. what are 3 types of vaccines?
    • modified live - attenuated
    • killed - non-attenuated
    • recombinant
  18. what 4 etiologies can vaccines be made from
    • viruses
    • bacteria
    • rickettsiae
    • fungi
  19. vaccines made form killed bacteria are called
    bacterins
  20. explain a vaccine response
    • vaccine is administered
    • immune system responds by producing antibodies specific to the antigen
    • this usually stimulates cell mediated immunity
  21. type of vaccine that is safe and produces antibodies
    killed vaccine
  22. type of vaccine that is not as safe, contains actual "bug", provides superior protecion because it stimulates antibody production and humoral immunity
    modified live vaccine
  23. type of vaccine that is considered to be superior antibody better (gp70 type) and stimulates both cell mediated immunity and humoral immunity
    recombinant vaccine
  24. another name for a modified live vaccine
    attenuated
  25. another name for a killed vaccine
    inactivated
  26. why are names like attenuated and inactivated preferred when talking about modified-live and killed vaccines
    the viruses do not completely fulfill the definition of living organism because it can no longer reproduce
  27. term meaning to prevent disease
    prophylaxis
  28. the portion of the antigen that actually binds with the antibody is called
    epitope
  29. spedific parts of the infective agent that are recognized by the immune system are called
    antigens
  30. along with the inactive pathogen what are the 5 things often found in vaccines
    • cell remnants from the culture
    • buffers
    • pH indicators
    • preservatives
    • adjuvants (enhance immune response)
  31. [blank] was added to vaccines (modified live) to encourage an inflammatory response
    adjuvants
  32. most common adjuvant used
    aluminum
  33. [blank] occurred due to the aluminum adjuvants added to vaccines (modified live) in cats
    malignant sarcomas
  34. 3 reasons recombinant vaccines are better
    • complete immunity - both humoral and cell mediated
    • no virulence - pars of the virus are controlled and cannot cause the disease
    • no adjuvants are needed
  35. what are the two kinds of immunity
    • humoral immunity
    • cell mediated immunity
  36. humoral immunity is also called
    B cell immunity
  37. cell mediated immunity is also called
    T cell immunity
  38. humoral immunity consist of [blank] and four immunoglobulins
    • [blank] = B lymphocytes
    • IgG
    • IgM
    • IgA
    • IgE
  39. the humoral response (aka immunity) involves [blank] and [blank]
    • lymphocytes
    • plasma cells
  40. B cells are produced in these 5 areas of the body
    • bone marrow (very little)
    • spleen
    • lymph nodes
    • thymus
    • lymph nodes of the intestines (Peyer's patches)
  41. what are 4 reasons that many vaccines fail
    • animal's response¬† (genetics, underlying disease, drugs in vaccine)
    • handling and administration of vaccine
    • maternal antibody interference
    • strain in vaccine is too different from the strain needed for protection
  42. what are 4 failures for a immune response
    • maternal antibodies
    • human error
    • preexisting infection
    • time
  43. what are 3 complications related with vaccination
    • pain and lethargy
    • anaphylaxis
    • injection-site reaction
  44. what are 3 types of injection-site reactions
    • granulomas
    • sarcoma
    • vaculitis
    • uveitis (uvea is the middle layer of the eye)
  45. what do each of the letters for DHLPPC stand for?
    • D = canine distemper
    • H= hepatitis (CAV-2/canine adenovirus type 2)
    • L = leptospirosis
    • P = canine parainfluenza
    • P = canine parvovirus
    • C = canine carona virus
  46. what is the vaccination schedule for a puppy from 6 weeks to 1 year
    • 6 weeks - parvo
    • 8-10 weeks - DHLPPC and Bordetella
    • 10-12 weeks - DHLPPC and Bordetella
    • 14-16 weeks - DHLPPC and rabies
    • 20 weeks - parvo
    • 6 months - parvo
    • 1 year - DHLPPC, Rabies and Bordetella
  47. what are 5 signs for a anaphylaxis reaction in a patient
    • hives
    • facial swelling
    • angioneurotic edema (swelling under the skin)
    • respiratory distress
    • severe diarrhea
    • shock
  48. this injection site reaction is a lump the sometimes forms at the vaccination site. Its harmless and usually regresses in a few day.
    granulomas
  49. this injection site reaction usually happens in cats and is usually caused by vaccines with aluminum based adjuvants. This also has a grave long term prognosis and take about 3 months to develop
    sarcoma
  50. this injection site reaction happens when the vaccine antigen and antibody are placed in the walls of a small blood vessel.
    Vasculitis
  51. this injection site reaction has been reported with CAV-1 (canine adenovirus type 1) vaccines and causes swelling in the middle layer of the eye
    uveitis

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview