Pathology Skin

Card Set Information

Author:
amirh899
ID:
236188
Filename:
Pathology Skin
Updated:
2013-09-22 14:24:31
Tags:
Skin
Folders:

Description:
skin
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user amirh899 on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. What are the functions of keratinocytes?
    producing protective keratin protein and cytokines
  2. Where is the location of melaoncyte in the skin?
    epidermis
  3. What are the APC in the skin?
    • dendrocytes in the dermis
    • Langerhans cells in the epidermis
  4. Which lymphocytes home to skin?
    those that expression of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA)
  5. What are Merkel cells?
    • Neuroendocrine cells within the epithelial basal cell layer.
    • These may serve as mechanoreceptors or possibly provide neuroendocrine function in skin.
  6. What is the function of hair follicles in addition to manufacturing hair shafts?
    They harbor protected niches of epithelial stem cells
  7. Microscopic or macroscopic?
    Ulcer
    Erosion
    Lichenification
    Excoriation?
    • Micro
    • Micro
    • Macro
    • Macro
  8. Which lesions are above 5 mm in the skin?
    • Nodule (dom shaped)
    • Plaque (flat raised)
    • Patch (non-raised change in pigmentation)
    • Bullae (fluid filled)
  9. Which lesions are less than 5 mm in the skin?
    • Macule (flat colored)
    • Papule (raised flat or dom-shpaed)
    • Vesicle (fluid filled)
  10. Which lesions in the skin are not related to size?
    • Blister (both vesicle and bullae)
    • Pustule (pus filled)
    • Wheal (dermal edema+erythema and itchy, transient, variable blanching)
    • Scale (Dry, horny, platelike excrescence; usually the result of imperfect cornification)
    • Excoriation (Traumatic lesion breaking the epidermis and causing a raw linear area (i.e., deep scratch); often self-induced)
    • Lichenification (Thickened and rough skin characterized by prominent skin markings ; usually the result of repeated rubbing)
    • Onycholysis (Separation of nail plate from nail bed)
  11. Which skin lesion is the result of repeated rubbing?
    Lichenification
  12. Scale is the result of which pathological process?
    Imperfect cornification
  13. What are the three types of edema in the skin lesions?
    • Wheal (Dermal, macroscopic)
    • Spongiosis (intercellular in epidermis, micro)
    • Ballooning or hydropic swelling (intracellular in epidermis, micro)
  14. What are the hyperplastic lesion in skin?
    • Acanthosis: Diffuse epidermal hyperplasia
    • Hypergranulosis: Hyperplasia of the stratum granulosum, often due to intense rubbing
    • Hyperkeratosis: Thickening of the stratum corneum, often associated with a qualitative abnormality of the keratin
  15. What is the difference between erosion and ulceration?
    • Erosion: Discontinuity of the skin showing incomplete loss of the epidermis
    • Ulceration: Discontinuity of the skin showing complete loss of the epidermis revealing dermis or subcutis
  16. Ballooning degeneration in the skin is usually a result of ......
    viral infection
  17. ......... is the Loss of intercellular cohesion between keratinocytes
    Acantholysis
  18. What is dyskeratosis?
    Abnormal, premature keratinization within cells below the stratum granulosum
  19. What is exocytosis?
    Infiltration of the epidermis by inflammatory cells
  20. A linear pattern of melanocyte proliferation within the epidermal basal cell layer is called....
    Lentiginous
  21. What is parakeratosis?
    Keratinization with retained nuclei in the stratum corneum. On mucous membranes, parakeratosis is normal.
  22. What is papillomatosis?
    Surface elevation caused by hyperplasia and enlargement of contiguous dermal papillae
  23. Vacoulization is .................
    Formation of vacuoles within or adjacent to cells; often refers to basal cell–basement membrane zone area
  24. what are the hallmarks of viral exanthems?
    1. Rusoela: <2 years, three to five days of fever>40 that resolves abruptly and is followed by development of a rash.  a blanching macular or maculopapular rash develops, starting on the neck and trunk and spreading to the face and extremities  (also FC)

    2. Measles: 3C+Koplik spot (dissapears before rash), stimson line (transverse line in the palpebra--> blanching erythematous "brick-red" maculopapular rash beginning in the head and neck (above the hairline) area and spreading centrifugally to the trunk and extremities. RASH is accompanied by FEVER

    3. Rubella: Mild prodromal, retroauricular, posterior cervical, posterior occipital LAP+ rash begins on face, less severe than measles, rose-colored spot on the soft palate (Forschheimer spots)

    • 4. Erythema infectiosum (Fifth disease): school aged children, low grade fever, three stage rash--> erythematous cheek (slapped cheek)+ circumoral pallor--> symmetric maculopapular truncal rash--> lacy, reticulated rash
    • 5. VZV: prodromal precede rash by one day--> rash begin on trunk (Papule--> vesicle--> ulcer--> crust)/ pruritus/ different stage of the lesion

    • 6. Scarlet fever: diffuse erythema that blanches with pressure, with numerous small (1 to 2 mm) papular elevations, giving a "sandpaper" quality to the skin. Starts on the head and neck and is accompanied by circumoral pallor and a strawberry tongue. Desquamates; the palms and soles are usually spared. Most marked in the skin folds . Linear petechial character in the antecubital fossae and axillary folds, known as Pastia's lines 
    •   
  25. What is the hallmark of roseola?
    • 1. Rusoela: <2 years, three to five days of fever>40 that resolves abruptly and is followed by development of a rash.  a blanching macular or maculopapular rash develops, starting on the neck and trunk and spreading to the face and extremities  (also FC)
  26. What is the hallmark of rubella?
    • Rubella: Mild prodromal, retroauricular, posterior cervical, posterior occipital LAP+ rash begins on face, less severe than measles, rose-colored spot on the soft palate (Forschheimer spots)
  27. How is measles diagnosed?
    • 2. Measles: 3C+Koplik spot (dissapears before rash), stimson line (transverse line in the palpebra--> blanching erythematous "brick-red" maculopapular rash beginning in the head and neck (above the hairline) area and spreading centrifugally to the trunk and extremities. RASH is accompanied by FEVER
  28. How is erythema infectiosum diagnosed?
    • Erythema infectiosum (Fifth disease): school aged children, low grade fever, three stage rash--> erythematous cheek (slapped cheek)+ circumoral pallor--> symmetric maculopapular truncal rash--> lacy, reticulated rash
  29. What is the feature of scarlet fever?
    • Scarlet fever: diffuse erythema that blanches with pressure, with numerous small (1 to 2 mm) papular elevations, giving a "sandpaper" quality to the skin. Starts on the head and neck and is accompanied by circumoral pallor and a strawberry tongue. Desquamates; the palms and soles are usually spared. Most marked in the skin folds . Linear petechial character in the antecubital fossae and axillary folds, known as Pastia's lines   
  30. What Tinea in unique to children?
    Capitis
  31. What are the features of Gray patch ?
    • hairs within the patch break off a millimeter or two above the level of the scalp
    • MC--> m.canis
    • fluoresce bright green
    • Ectothrix
  32. What are the features of black dot?
    • MC in US
    • Black
    • T.Tonsurans
    • Human to human
    • No florescence
    • Endothrix
  33. What are the features of Favus?
    • T.Schoenleini
    • initially develop perifollicular erythema on the scalp, which progresses to the characteristic finding of concave, cup-shaped yellow crusts called scutula
    • Endothrix
    • Blue silver florescence
  34. Endothrix versus ectothrix (T versus M)
  35. What are the mcc of Tinea capitis and corporis?
    • T.rubrum
    • Central clearing
    • Raised peripheral erythematous active lesion
    • Cruris DOES NOT INVOLVE SCROTUM (CANDIDA INVOLVES SCROTUM)
  36. What are the mcc of tinea pedis?
    • Acute(vesicle)--> T.mentagrophytes
    • Chronic (plus manuum, nail, scaly)--> T.rubrum
  37. What are the features of erythrasma?
    • C.minutismum
    • MC interdigital> groin, axilla
    • Coral red florescence
  38. What are the hallmarks of tinea versicolor?
    • hypopigmented, hyperpigmented, or erythematous macules and patches. The most common areas of involvement include the upper trunk and proximal upper extremities
    • Lipid-dependent malassezia furfur
    • Spaghetti and meat ball (curvaed hyphae and clusters of conidia)

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview