Vocabulary

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gandalfthegrey
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236306
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Vocabulary
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2013-09-30 01:00:01
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Vocabulary
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Vocabulary for life
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  1. Preponderant

    "Daniel Tracy Touchett, a native of Ruthland, in the state of Vermont,
    came to England as a subordinate partner in a banking-house where some
    ten years later he gained preponderant control"
    (Adj.) Superior in weight, force, influence, numbers, etc.; prevailing
  2. Contingency

    "She had resented so strongly, after discovering them, her mere errors of feeling that the chance of inflicting a sensible injury upon another person, presented only as a contingency, caused her at moments to hold her breath."
    (Noun) Dependence on chance or on the fulfillment of a condition; uncertainty; fortuitousness.
  3. Precipitate

    "It may appear to some readers that the young lady was both precipitate and unduly fastidious: but the latter of these facts, if the charge be true, may serve to exonerate her from the discredit of the former"
    To hasten the occurrence of; bring about prematurely, hastily, or suddenly.
  4. Fastidious

    "It may appear to some readers that the young lady was both precipitate and unduly fastidious: but the latter of these facts, if the charge be true, may serve to exonerate her from the discredit of the former"
    (Adj.) Excessively particular, critical, or validating; hard to please.
  5. Impute

    " According to Isabel, if Miss Molyneux should ever learn what had passed between Miss Archer asks Lord Warburton she would p probably be shocked at such a girl's failure to rise; or no, rather (this was our heroine's last position), she would impute to the young American but a due consciousness of inequality"
    (Verb) To attribute or to ascribe
  6. Benighted

    " 'Do you know you're the first lord I've ever seen?' she said very promptly to her neighbour. 'I suppose you think I'm awfully benighted.'"
    (Adj) Intellectually or morally ignorant; unenlightened
  7. Credulity

    "Which was his harmless revenge for having occasionally had his credulity too easily engaged in America."
    Gullibility
  8. Deplorable

    " Like many ladies of her country who had lived a long time in Europe, she had completely lost her native tact on such points, and in her reaction, not in itself deplorable, against the liberty allowed to young persons beyond the seas, had fallen into gratuitous and exaggerated scruples."
    (Adj.) Causing or being a subject for censure, reproach, or disapproval; wretched; very bad
  9. Scruples

    " Like many ladies of her country who had lived a long time in Europe, she had completely lost her native tact on such points, and in her reaction, not in itself deplorable, against the liberty allowed to young persons beyond the seas, had fallen into gratuitous and exaggerated scruples."
    (N.) A moral or ethical consideration or standard that acts as a restraining force or inhibits certain actions
  10. Abeyance

    "The London social scene was in abeyance during the late summer and the start of the shooting season."
    (N.) Temporary inactivity, cessation, or suspension
  11. Derision

    "As London starts in the month of September a face blank but for its smears of prior service, the young man, who occasionally took an apologetic for, was obliged to remind his companion, to Miss Stackpole's high derision, that there wasn't a creature in town"
    (N.) Ridicule; mockery
  12. Colloquy

    " She prepared to start for Jermyn Street, taking leave first of Ralph Touchett and Isabel, who, seated on garden chairs in another part of the enclosure, were occupied - if the term may be used - with an exchange of amenities less pointed than the practical colloquy of Miss Stackpole and Mr Banting."
    (N.) A conversational exchange; dialogue
  13. Temerity

    "' I promised just now to be very amusing; but you see I don't come up to the mark, and the fact is there's a good deal of temerity in one's undertaking to amuse a person like you.'"
    (N.) Excessive confidence or boldness; audacity
  14. Mountebank

    "' You've grand ideas - you've a high standard in such matters. I ought at least to bring in a band of music or company of mountebanks."
    (N.) A person who deceives others, esp. in order to trick them out of their money; a charlatan.
  15. Prosaic

    "' Of course, if you were to marry our friend you'd still have a career - a very decent, in fact very brilliant one. But relatively speaking it would be a little prosaic.'"
    (Adj.) Commonplace; unromantic.
  16. Epistolary

    " 'I can imagine that at the end of ten years we might have a very pleasant correspondence. I shall have matured my epistolary style.'"
    (Adj.) Relating to or denoting the writing of letters or literary works in the form of letters.
  17. Turbid

    " She turned away from him, walked to the open window and stood a moment looking into the dusky void of the street, where a turbid gaslight alone represented social animation."
    (Adj.) Cloudy, opaque
  18. Odious

    " She had virtually requested him to go - he knew that; but at the risk of making himself odious he kept his ground."
    (Adj.) Extremely unpleasant; repulsive
  19. Sophism

    "' It's to make you independent that I want to marry you.'
      ' That's a beautiful sophism' said the girl with a smile more beautiful still."
    (N.) A fallacious argument, esp. one used deliberately to deceive.
  20. Remonstrance

    " He appeared unable to move; there was still an immense willingness in his attitude and a sore remonstrance in his eyes. "
    (N.) A forcefully reproachful protest.
  21. Intractable

    " The old name survived in many later English accounts that single out Gold Coast slaves called "Coramantines" as specially able, but intractable."
    (Adj.) Hard to control or deal with.
  22. Verily

    " It had had, verily, two causes: part of it was to be accounted for by her long discussion with Mr. Goodwood, but it might be feared that the rest was simply the enjoyment she found in the exercise of her power."
    (Adv.) Truly; certainly
  23. Frivolity

    " ' Do you know where you're going, Isabel Archer?'
    ' Just now I'm going to bed,' said Isabel with persistent frivolity."
    (Adj.) Characterized by lack of seriousness or sense.
  24. Repudiated

    " He remembered that Isabel, in separating from him in Winchester Square, had repudiated his suggestion that her motive in doing so was the expectation of a visitor at Pratt's Hotel, and it was a new pang to him to have the suspect her of duplicity."
    (V.) Refuse to accept or be associated with.
  25. Duplicity

    " He remembered that Isabel, in separating from him in Winchester
    Square, had repudiated his suggestion that her motive in doing so was
    the expectation of a visitor at Pratt's Hotel, and it was a new pang to
    him to have the suspect her of duplicity."
    (N.) Deceitfulness in speech or conduct, as by speaking or acting in two different ways to different people concerning the same matter; double dealing.
  26.  Advent

    " The advent of a guest was in itself far from disconcerting; she had not yet divested herself of a young faith that each new acquaintance would exert some momentous influence on her life."
    (N.) The arrival of a notable person, thing, or event.
  27. Repast

    " On the appearance of this repast Mrs. Touchett had apparently been notified, for she now arrived and addressed herself to the tea pot.:
    (N.) A meal.
  28. Superfluous

    " ' I always forget where you were born.'
    'It's hardly worth while then I should tell you.'
    ' On the contrary,' said Mrs Touchett, who rarely missed a logical point; ' if I remembered your telling me would be quite superfluous.'"
    (Adj.) Being more than is sufficient or required; excessive.
  29. Sagacious

    " The local doctor, a very sagacious man, in whom Ralph had secretly more confidence than in his distinguished colleague, was constantly in attendance, and Sir Matthew Hope came back several."
    (Adj.) Having or showing keen mental discernment and good judgment; shrewd.
  30. Prevaricate

    " 'There will be no need of my denying it if you don't say it,' the old man answered. 'Why should we prevaricate just at the last?'"
    (V.) Speak or act in an evasive way.
  31. Demur

    " Mr. Touchett said nothing for a while; and then, 'I want to talk a little,' he went on.
    'Won't it tire you?' Ralph demurred."
    (V.) To make objection; take exception.
  32. Querulous

    " ' Very likely she will; but that's no reason -!' Mr Touchett let his phrase away in a helpless but not quite querulous sigh and remained silent again."
    (Adj.) Full of complaints; complaining.
  33. Facetious

    " It had long been Mr Touchett's most ingenious way of taking the cheerful view of his son's possible duration. Ralph had usually treated it facetiously; but present circumstances proscribed the facetious."
    (Adj.) Treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humor.
  34. Proscribe

    " It had long been Mr Touchett's most ingenious way of taking the
    cheerful view of his son's possible duration. Ralph had usually treated
    it facetiously; but present circumstances proscribed the facetious."
    (V.) To denounce or condemn.
  35. Tenacity

    " 'It will only tire you, dear daddy,' said Ralph, who marvelled at his father's tenacity and at his finding strength to insist."
    (Adj.) Persistence.
  36. Cannily

    " If she has an income she'll never have to marry for support. That's what I want cannily to prevent."
    (Adj.) Carefully; cautiously; prudently.
  37. Termagant

    " For when the fair in all their pride expire,
    To their first elements their souls retire:
    The sprites of fiery termagants in flame
    Mount up, and take a Salamander's name."
    (N.) Harsh-tempered or overbearing woman.
  38. Lampoon

    " Here stood Ill Nature like an ancient maid,
    Her wrinkled form in black and white arrayed;
    With store of prayers, for mornings, nights, and noons,
    Her hand is filled; her bosom with lampoons."
    (V.) Publicly criticize (someone or something) by using ridicule, irony, or sarcasm.
  39. Affectation

    " There Affectation with a sickly mien
    Shows in her cheek the roses of eighteen,
    Practiced to lisp, and hang the head aside,
    Faints into airs, and languishes with pride;
    On the rich quilt sinks with becoming woe,
    Wrapped in a gown, for sickness, and for show."
    (N.) Behavior, speech, or writing that is artificial and designed to impress
  40. Mien

    " There Affectation with a sickly mien
    Shows in her cheek the roses of eighteen,
    Practiced to lisp, and hang the head aside,
    Faints into airs, and languishes with pride;
    On the rich quilt sinks with becoming woe,
    Wrapped in a gown, for sickness, and for show."
    (N.) A person's look or manner, esp. one of a particular kind indicating their character or mood.
  41. Ire

    "Belinda burns with more than mortal ire,
    And fierce Thelastris fans with rising ire."
    (N.) Anger.
  42. Fops

    " Gods! shall the ravisher display your hair,
    While the fops envy, and the ladies stare!"
    (N.) A man who is concerned with his clothes and appearance in an affected and excessive way; a dandy.
  43. Virago

    " ' To arms, to arms!' the fierce virago cries,
    And swift as lightning to the combat flies."
    • (N.) A domineering, violent, or bad-tempered woman.
    • Archaic - A woman of masculine strength or spirit; a female warrior.
  44. Titilate

    " She with one finger and a thumb subdued;
    Just where the breath of life his nostrils drew,
    A charge of snuff the wily virgin threw;
    The Gnomes direct, to every atom just,
    The pungent grains of titillating dust."
    (V.) Stimulate or excite (someone).
  45. Propitious

    " A sudden star, it shot through liquid air,
    And drew behind a radiant trail of hair....
        This pleased the beau monde shall from the Mall survey,
    And hail with music its propitious way."
    (Adj.) Giving or indicating a good chance of success; favorable.
  46. Interminable

    " The sea-reach of the Thames stretched out before us like the beginnings of an interminable waterway"
    (Adj.) Unending.
  47. Ascetic

    " He had sunken cheeks, a yellow complexion, a straight back, an ascetic aspect, and, with his arms dropped, the palms of hands outwards, resembled an idol."
    (Adj.) Characterized by or suggesting the practice of severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons.
  48. Interlopers

    " They sailed from Deptford, from Greenwich, from Erith - the adventurers and the settlers; kings' ships and the ships of men on 'Change; captains, admirals, the dark "interlopers" of the Eastern trade, and the commissioned "generals" of East India fleets.
    (N.) A person who becomes involved in a place or situation where they are not wanted or are considered not to belong.
  49. Immutability

    " In the immutability of their surroundings the foreign shores, the foreign faces, the changing immensity of life, glide past, veiled not by a sense of mystery but by a slightly disdainful ignorance; for there is nothing mysterious to a seamen unless it be the sea itself, which is the mistress of his existence and as inscrutable as Destiny."
    (Adj.) Unchanging over time or unable to be changed
  50. Inscrutable

    " In the immutability of
    their surroundings the foreign shores, the foreign faces, the changing
    immensity of life, glide past, veiled not by a sense of mystery but by a
    slightly disdainful ignorance; for there is nothing mysterious to a
    seamen unless it be the sea itself, which is the mistress of his
    existence and as inscrutable as Destiny."
    (Adj.) Impossible to understand or interpret.
  51. Sententious

    " ' I am not such a fool as I look, quoth Plato to his disciples,' he said sententiously, emptied his glass with great resolution, and we rose."
    (Adj.) Given to moralizing in a pompous or affected manner.
  52. Excrescent

    " Expunge the whole, or ingenious pain: /
    Expunge the whole, or lap the excrescent parts"
    (Adj.) Distinct outgrowth on a human or animal body or on a plant, esp. one that is the result of disease or abnormality.
  53. Educing

    " The Eternal Art educing good from ill, /
    Grafts on this Passion our best principle"
    (V.) Bring out or develop (something latent or potential).
  54. Dross

    " The dross cements what else were too refined, /
    And in one interest body acts with mind."
    (N.) Something regarded as worthless; rubbish.
  55. Deign

    " As Helluo, late dictator of the feast, /
    Critiqued your wine, and analyzed your meat, / Yet on plain pudding deigned at home to eat"
    (V.) Do something that one considers to be beneath one's dignity.
  56.  Imperturbable

    " 'Are you an alienist?' I interrupted. 'Every doctor should be - a little,' answered that original, imperturbably."
    (Adj.) Unable to be upset or excited; calm.
  57. Sordid

    " Every day the coast looked the same, as though we had not moved; but we passed various places - trading places - with names like Gran' Bassam, Little Popo, names that seemed to belong to some sordid farce acted in front of a sinister blackcloth."
    (Adj.) Involving ignoble actions and motives; arousing moral distaste and contempt.
  58. Morose

    " He was a young man, lean, fair, and morose, with lanky hair and a shuffling gait."
    (Adj.) Sullen and ill-tempered.
  59. Declivity

    " A rocky cliff appeared, mounds of turned-up earth by the shore, houses on a hill, others, with iron roofs, amongst a waste of excavations, or hanging to the declivity."
    (N.) A downward slope.
  60. Recrudesce

    " A blinding sunlight drowned all this at times in a sudden recrudescence of glare."
    (V.) Break out again; recur.
  61. Despondent

    "Behind this raw matter one of the reclaimed, the product of the new forces at work, strolled despondently, carrying a rifle by its middle."
    (Adj.) In low spirits from loss of hope or courage.
  62. Alacrity

    " He had a uniform jacket with one button off, and seeing a white man on the path, hoisted his weapon on to his shoulder with alacrity."
    (N.) Brisk and cheerful readiness.
  63. Propitiate

    " He had tied a bit of white worsted round his neck - Why? Where did he get it? Was it a badge - an ornament - a charm - a propitiatory act?"
    (V.) Win or regain the favor of (a god, spirit, or person) by doing something that pleases them.
  64. Rapacity

    " The word 'ivory' rang in the air, was whispered, was sighed. You would think they were praying to it. A taint of imbecile rapacity blew through it all, like a whiff from some corpse."
    (Adj.) Aggressively greedy or grasping.
  65. Superciliousness

    " His little eyes glittered like a mica discs - with curiosity - though he tried to keep up a bit of superciliousness."
    (Adj.) Behaving or looking as though one thinks one is superior to others.
  66. Prevaricator

    " It was very pretty to see how he baffled himself, for in truth my body was full of chills, and my head had nothing in it but that wretched steamboat business. It was evident he took me for a perfectly shameless prevaricator."
    (V.) Speak or act in an evasive way.
  67. Conflagrations

    " ' Serve him right. Transgression - punishment - bang! Pitiless, pitiless. That's the only way. This will prevent all conflagrations for the future.' "
    (N.) An extensive fire that destroys a great deal of land or property.
  68. Gesticulate

    "The pilgrims could be seen in knots gesticulating, discussing."
    (V.) Use gestures, esp. dramatic ones, instead of speaking or to emphasize one's words.
  69. Inextricable

    " Five such installments came, with their absurd air of disorderly flight with the loot of innumerable outfit shops and provision stores, that, one would think, they were lugging, after a raid, into the wilderness for equitable division. It was an inextricable mess of things decent in themselves but that human folly made look like the spoils of thieving."
    (Adj.) Impossible to disentangle or separate.
  70. Ostentation

    "
    Pretentious and vulgar display, esp. of wealth and luxury, intended to impress or attract notice.

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