LANGUAGE ARTS

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LANGUAGE ARTS
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2014-02-01 18:51:11
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  1. TWO OR MORE SINGULAR NOUNS CONNECTED BY OR/NOR REQUIRE A ______ VERB.
    • SINGULAR
    • EX: THE HAT OR COAR IS MY FAVORITE ACCESORY.
  2. WHAT IS A COMPOUND SUBJECT?
    TWO OR MORE NOUNS
  3. WHEN A COMPOUND SUBJECT IS CONNECT BY OR/NOR AND ONE IS SINGULAR AND THE ONE IS PLURAL, WHAT IS THE VERB AGREE WITH? SINGULAR OR PLURAL?
    THE VERB AGREES WIT THE CLOSER OF THE TWO.

    EX: THE BOYS OR HIS SISTERS EAT LUNCH WITH BETTY EVERY SUNDAY.
  4. IS THE WORD "EVERYBODY" SINGULAR OR PLURAL?
    SINGULAR.
  5. IS THE WORD ANYBODY SINGULAR OR PLURAL?
    SINGULAR
  6. T OR F
    COLLECT NOUNS SUGGEST MULTIPLE PEOPLE BUT ARE CONSIDERED A SINGULAR ENTITY.
    • TRUE.
    • USE SINGULAR VERBS
  7. NEITHER OF THE BOYS WAS/WERE READY.

    WHICH OF THE UNDERLINED IS CORRECT?
    • WAS.
    • SINGULAR
  8. LAY/LIE ON THE SOFA MR. SMITH AND RELAX.

    WHICH OF THE UNDERLINED IS CORRECT?
    LIE.

    LAY REQUIRES A DIRECT OBJECT, SOMETHING PHYSICAL.
  9. THE CHEIF TOOK/BROUGHT THE DINNER TO HIS PREFERED PATRONS.

    WHICH OF THE UNDERLINED IS CORRECT?
    TOOK.

    • YOU ASK PEOPLE TO BRING YOU THINGS.
    • YOU TAKE THINGS TO WHERE YOUR GOING.
    • YOU BRING THINGS HERE AND TAKE THINGS THERE.
  10. MEL OWNED A DINER/DINNER?
    DINER.

    • THINK YOU WANT TO EAT MORE, DINNER.
    • YOU WANT TO PAY LESS DINER.
  11. WORDS THAT SOUND THE SAME BUT HAVE DIFFERERNT MEANINGS. SOMETIMES SPELLED THE SAME.
    HOMOPHONES

    • EX:
    • ROSE (FLOWER)
    • ROSE (PAST TENSE OF RISE)
  12. IF A GROUP OF WORDS THAT CONTAIN A SUBJECT AND A VERB ACTS AS A ADJECTIVE, IT IS CALLED _________ _______?
    ADJECTIVE CLAUSE.

    EX:MY SISTER, WHO IS MUCH OLDER THAN I AM, IS AN ENGINEER.
  13. IF AN ADJECTIVE CLUASE BECOMES STRIPPED OF ITS SUBJECT AND VERB THE RESULTING MODIFIER BECOMES A _______ ____?
    ADJECTIVE PHRASE

    • EX:
    • HE IS THE MAN WHO IS KEEP MY FAMILY IN THE POORHOUSE.
  14. DEFINE COMPARATIVE AND SUPERLATIVE.
    • COMPARTIVE. 2 THINGS
    • SUPERLATIVE. 3 OR MORE.
    • NOTE THAT COMPARATIVE UTILIZES "THAN"
    • SUPERLATIVE UTILIZES "THE"
  15. _______ CARRY THE IDEA OF BEING OR ACTION.
    VERB
  16. NAME THE FOUR VERB FORMS.
    • Base form
    • Past form
    • Present participle
    • Past participle
  17. Adverbs are words that modify WHAT?
    • •a verb
    • (He drove slowly. — How did he drive?)

    • •an adjective
    • (He drove a very fast car. — How fast was his car?)

    • •another adverb
    • (She moved quite slowly down the aisle. — How slowly did she move?)
  18. a group of words containing a subject and verb acts as an adverb (modifying the
    verb of a sentence), it is called -----------?
    • Adverb Clause.
    •   
    • When this class is over, we're going to the movies.
  19. ------------------------ frequently have adverbial functions (telling place and time, modifying the verb):
    Prepositional phrases.

    •He went to the movies.

    •She works on holidays.

    •They lived in Canada during the war.
  20. She moved slowly and spoke quietly.
    VERB, ADVERB OR ADJECTIVES?
    ADVERBS OF MANNER.
  21. She has lived on the island all her life.
    She still lives
    there now.

    VERB, ADVERB OR ADJECTIVES?
    Adverbs of Place.
  22. She takes the boat to the mainland every day.
    She
    often goes by herself.

    VERB, ADVERB OR ADJECTIVES?
    Adverbs of Frequency.
  23. She tries to get back before dark.
    It's starting to get dark
    now.
    She finished her tea
    first.
    She left
    early.

    VERB, ADVERB OR ADJECTIVES?
    Adverbs of Time
  24. She drives her boat slowly to avoid hitting the rocks.
    She shops in several stores
    to get the best buys.

    VERB, ADVERB OR ADJECTIVES?
    Adverbs of Purpose
  25. WHAT USUALLY ENDS IN "LY"?
    ADVERBS
  26. How Do You Use TO AND TOO?
    • TO: Use to as a preposition before a noun or as an infinitive before a verb.
    • "Please take me to the dance"
    • "We don't need to buy that right now."

    TOO: Use too as a synonym for also or to indicate excessiveness before a verb.

    • Usually, if you can replace too with also in the same sentence, and it still makes sense, then you are using it correctly.
    • "I am going to the mall, too."
    • "I had too many tacos for lunch."
  27. You have ____ many toys already.
    TO OR TOO?
    TOO
  28. How Do You Use There, They're, and Their?
    There:Use there to refer to a physical or abstract place. Usually, if you can replace there with here in the same sentence, and it still makes sense, then you are using it correctly.

    They're: Use they're as a contraction for they are. Usually, if you can replace they're with they are in the same sentence, and it still makes sense, then you are using it correctly.

    Their: Use their to show possession, commonly followed by a noun. Usually, if you can replace their with our in the same sentence, and it still makes sense, then you are using it correctly.
  29. Put that suitcase over ______.
    There, They're or Their?
    THERE
  30. What Is the Difference Between Affecand Effect?

    • affect effect aardvark
    • Affect with an a means "to influence," as in.

    Effect with an e has a lot of subtle meanings as a noun, but to me the meaning "a result" seems to be at the core of all the definitions
  31. It's vsIts 

    • It's is a contraction for it is or it has.
    • Its is a possessive pronoun meaning, more or less, of it or belonging to it.
    • And there is absolutely, positively, no such word as its'.

    A simple test



    If you can replace it[']s in your sentence with it is or it has, then your word is it's; otherwise, your word is its.

    Another test



    Its is the neuter version of his and her. Try plugging her into your sentence where you think its belongs. If the sentence still works grammatically (if not logically) then your word is indeed its.

    Examples



    • It's been good to know you. Contraction: it has
    • It's a bird! It's a plane! Contraction: it is
  32. YOU'RE AND YOUR DIFFERENCES.
    • You’re: When describing someone else"
    • TEST IT, Replace “you’re” with “you are”.
    • 1. “You’re my best friend.”
    • Test: “You are my best friend.”(Correct!)
    • 2. “I like you’re backpack.”
    • Test: “I like you are backpack.”(Incorrect.)

    • Your:When talking about ownership of something. TEST IT, Replace “your” with “my”.
    • 1. “Your hair is so cool.”
    • Test: “My hair is so cool.”(Correct!)
    • 2. “Your going to meet me at 6 p.m.”
    • Test: “My going to meet me at 6 p.m.”(Incorrect.)
  33. WHOSE AND WHO'S WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE?
    • The trouble here is due to the apostrophe, which on 99% of English words indicates possession, but on this one simply indicates a contraction. If you can replace the word with who is or who has, use who's. If not, use whose.
    • Who's is a contraction of who is or, less commonly, who has.
    • Who's watching TV?
    • Do you know who's going to speak?
    • Who's ready to go?

    • Whose is the possessive of who or, somewhat controversially, which.
    • Whose book is this?
    • Do you know whose car this is?
    • I know a woman whose kids study there.
  34. What is the method of organization?
    What are clue for different methods?
    Problem-solution (cause and effect)  words like therefore, because, caused, resulted in.

    • Chronological order—dates, time words.

    • Comparison and contrast—similar, different, alike, include.

    • Order of importance—first, second, third,--most, least—first, last.
  35. A PREPOSITIONAL PHRASE USUALLY FUNCTIONS AS A ____ OR _______.
    ADVERB OR ADJECTIVE
  36. THE ______ OF A SENTENCE USUALLY EXPRESSES ACTION OR BEING.
    VERB
  37. WHAT ARE MODAL VERBS?
    • HELPING VERBS. THEY HELP SUPPORT THE MAIN VERB.
    • Common Modal Verbs:
    • Can Could May Might Must
    • Ought Shall Should Will Would
  38. what are particles of verbs?
    VERBS THAT HAVE 2 WORDS, USUALLY THE 2ND WORD IS THE PARTICLE.

    EX: CALL OFF, LOOK UP, DROP OFF. 

    THE MAIN VERB WILL BE THE ONE THAT YOU CAN CHANGE TO MATCH THE NOUN OR TENSE.
  39. WHAT IS A present participle
    A verb form that indicates an ongoing action or state in the present and which can function as an adjective.

    a present participle adds the suffix -ing to a verb
  40. HOW DO YOU FORM A PRESENT PARTICIPLE?
    ADD "ING" TO THE VERB. 

    A verb form that indicates an ongoing action or state in the present and which can function as an adjective.
  41. WHEN BOTH THE PAST-TENSE AND PAST PARTICIPLE FORMS OF A VERB END IN "ED" IS THE VERB REGULAR OR IRREGULAR?
    REGULAR

    IN ALL OTHER CASES THE VERB IS IRREGULAR.
  42. T OR F 
    THE VERB "BE" IS HIGHLY IRREGULAR, HAVING EIGHT FORMS INSTEAD OF THE USUALLY FIVE.
    TRUE
  43. ______ IS A WORD THAT MODIFIES OR DESCRIBES A NOUN OR PRONOUN.
    ADJECTIVE

    • THEY ASK:
    • WHICH ONE ?
    • WHAT KIND OF ?
    • HOW MANY ?
  44. _______ IS USED TO MODIFY OR QUALIFY A VERB, ADJECTIVE OR ADVERB.
    ADVERB.

    • USUALLY ANSWERS ONE OF THESE:
    • WHEN
    • WHERE
    • WHAT
    • HOW
  45. T OR F 
    ADVERBS MODIFYING ADJECTIVES OR OTHER ADVERBS USUALLY INTENSIFY OR LIMIT THE INTENSITY OF THE WORDS THEY MODIFY.
    TRUE
  46. THE NEGATORS _____ AND ______ ARE CLASSIFIED AS VERBS.
    NOT AND NEVER
  47. A _________ adverb is an adverb that connects two clauses. Conjunctive adverbs show cause and effect, sequence, contrast, comparison, or other relationships.
    conjunctive  

    Conjunctive adverbs show cause and effect, sequence, contrast, comparison, or other relationships.

    Use a semicolon or period before the conjunctive adverb to separate two independent clauses joined by a conjunctive adverb

    • EX:
    • THEN
    • THUS
    • furthermore
    • hence
    • henceforth
    • however
    • in addition
    • in comparison
    • in contrast
    • in fact
  48. A _________ ________ joins parts of a sentence (for example words or independent clauses) that are grammatically equal or similar.
    A coordinating conjunction joins parts of a sentence (for example words or independent clauses) that are grammatically equal or similar.

    A coordinating conjunction shows that the elements it joins are similar in importance and structure.

    EX: and, but, or, nor, for, yet, so

    • When a coordinating conjunction joins independent clauses, it is always correct to place a comma before the conjunction:
    • I want to work as an interpreter in the future, so I am studying Russian at university.
  49. T OR F
    THE SUBJECT OF A SENTENCE USUALLY PRECEDES THE VERB, BUT IN SENTENCES THAT START WITH " THERE ARE" OR "THERE WAS" THE SUBJECT FOLLOWS THE VERB.
    TRUE
  50. WHAT THE HELL ARE LINKING VERBS?
    Linking verbs do not express action. Instead, they connect the subject of the verb to additional information about the subject.

    • EX: Keila is a shopaholic.
    • Ising isn't something that Keila can do. 
    • Is connects the subject, Keila, to additional information about her, that she will soon have a huge credit card bill to pay.

    The following verbs are true linking verbs: any form of the verb be [am, is, are, was, were, has been, are being, might have been, etc.], become, and seem. These true linking verbs are always linking verbs.

    If you can substitute am, is, or are and the sentence still sounds logical, you have alinking verb on your hands.If, after the substitution, the sentence makes no sense, you are dealing with an action verb instead
  51. Any form of the verb be [am, is, are, was, were, has been, are being, might have been, etc.], become, and seem.

    WHAT TYPE PF VERBS ARE THESE?
    • LINKING VERBS 
    • How do you tell when they are action verbs and when they are linking verbs?

    If you can substitute am, is, or are and the sentence still sounds logical, you have a linking verb on your hands.

    If, after the substitution, the sentence makes no sense, you are dealing with an action verb instead.
  52. WHAT THE HELL IS A TRANSITIVE VERB?
    A transitive verb has two characteristics.

    • First, it is an action verb, expressing a doable activity like kick, want, paint, write, eat, clean, etc.
    • Second, it must have a direct object, something or someone who receives the action of the verb.

    • EX:Sylvia kicked Juan under the table.
    • Kicked = transitive verb; Juan = direct object.
  53. Joshua wants a smile from Leodine, his beautiful but serious lab partner.

    WHAT IS THE TRANSITIVE VERB? 
    WHAT IS THE DIRECT OBJECTIVE?
    • wants = transitive verb
    • smile = direct object.
  54. what is correct for the underlined?

    One of the most common types of mistakes that inexperienced physicians make is misreading symptoms, another that occurs about as frequently is recommending inappropriate treatment.
    (A) symptoms, another that occurs
    (B) symptoms; another one that occurs
    (C) symptoms, the other, and it occurs
    (D) symptoms; another one which is occurring
    (E) symptoms and also occurring
    • This sentence illustrates a comma splice, the incorrect use of a comma to connect two complete sentences.
    • Choice (B) correctly uses a semicolon to coordinate two independent clauses and form a compound sentence (while at the same time keeping verb tenses parallel).
  55. whats correct for the underlined?

    The revolt against Victorianism was perhaps even more marked in poetry than either fiction or drama.
    (A) either fiction or drama
    (B) either fiction or in drama
    (C) either in fiction or drama
    (D) in either fiction or drama
    (E) in either fiction or in drama
    • D
    • Correcting the error in this sentence requires close attention to the need for parallelism. The structure of the underlined portion should match the structure of the phrase "in poetry" that appears earlier in the sentence.
  56. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ACCEPT AND EXCEPT.
    • ACCEPT (verb) to take
    • Ex: I am happy to accept your payment.

    • EXCEPT often a preposition meaning leaving out)    
    • Ex:Everyone except me is going.
  57. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THERE THEIR & THEY'RE.
    • THERE in that place
    • Ex: Park the car there.

    • THEIR belonging to them
    • Ex: Do they know their lines for the play?

    • THEY'RE contraction of they are.
    • Ex: They're always late for work.
  58. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IT'S AND ITS.
    • IT'S contraction of it is
    • Ex: It's too late for you to register now.

    JUST BECAUSE YOU SEE " 'S " DON'T THINK POSSESSION!!

    • ITS a pronoun meaning belong to it
    • Ex: That cat has lost its way home.
  59. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AFFECT AND EFFECT.
    • AFFECT (verb) influence
    • Ex: Bright light affects my eyes.

    • EFFECT(often a noun) result
    • Ex: He studies the effect of drought on crops
  60. WHEN ROD GRADUATED AT THE TOP OF HIS CLASS, NO ONE WAS SURPRISED AT HIS______ INTO LAW SCHOOL.

    ACCEPTANCE OR EXCEPTENCE?
    ACCEPTANCE

    accept - (verb) to take

    except - (often a preposition meaning leaving out)
  61. DEFINE OBJECTIVE POINT OF VIEW.
    the telling of information using facts and not showing bias or prejudice; detached; impersonal.

    Ex:The reporting of news should be objective - Who, what, when, and where.
  62. DEFINE SUBJECTIVE POINT OF VIEW
    the telling of information using personal feelings and opinions, personal bias and prejudice, and not always based on facts.

    Ex:An editorial gives personal opinion. A mother's account of her child's talents shows bias.
  63. DEFINE BIAS
    prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair.

    synonyms:prejudice, partiality, partisanship, favoritism, unfairness, one-sidedness.
  64. WHAT ARE CONNOTATIONS?
    emotional coloring and personal associations.

    • The connotation of rat is usually negative rather than positive because we associate rats with disease and despicable living conditions.
    • Also, the use of rat as slang refers to a sneaky, contemptible person.
  65. List the 7 steps typically used in the writing process.
    • Choosing and limiting the subject.
    • Determining the purpose of the composition.
    • Collecting information and brainstorming ideas.
    • Outlining.
    • Writing a first draft.
    • Revising.
    • Writing a final draft.
  66. DEFINE PRESENT PERFECT TENSE OF A VERB.
    The present perfect tense is used mainly to express an action (or to help make a statement about something) that has been completed at some indefinite time in the past.

    It is formed with have or has and the past participle.

    Ex:Mr. Brown has painted five houses in our neighborhood.
  67. DEFINE PAST PERFECT TENSE OF A VERB.
    The past perfect tense is used to express an action (or to help make a statement about something) that was completed in the past and preceded some other past action or event.

    It is formed with had and the past participle.

    Ex: Before he moved to Springfield, Mr. Brown had painted professionally with a contractor in Campaign.
  68. DEFINE FUTURE PERFECT TENSE OF A VERB.
    The future perfect tense is used to express an action (or to help make a statement about something) that will be completed in the future before some other future action or event.

    It is formed with will have or shall have and the past participle.

    Ex. - By the time he retires next summer, Mr. Brown will have painted for thirty years.
  69. Case Forms of Personal Pronouns.. NAME THE THREE.
    • NOMINATIVE CASE      (EX: I, YOU, HE, IT)
    • OBJECTIVE CASE         (EX: ME, YOU ,HIM, IT)
    • POSSESSIVE CASE    (EX: MY, YOURS, HIS,ITS)
  70. WHAT THE HELL IS A GERUND?
    verb forms behaving like nouns.

    • Ex: I could not understand his waiting in line for two hours to get a ticket. ("Waiting" is a gerund.) 
    • HIS IS A POSSESSIVE PRONOUN THEY ARE USUALLY BEFORE GERUNDS.
  71. The __________ case pronouns are used for sentence subjects and for predicate nominatives.
    • nominative
    • I, YOU, HE, SHE ,IT, WE, YOU, THEY
    •  
    • She is my friend. (subject)
    • It was he who won the contest. (predicate nominative)
  72. The ________ case pronouns are used for objects of prepositions and direct objects.
    objective

    ME, YOU, HIM, HER, IT, US, YOU, THEM

    • Give the money to Kim and me. (object of preposition)
    • Will you drive them to school today? (direct object)
  73. T OR F
    possessive pronouns are not like possessive nouns. Possessive nouns use apostrophes; possessive pronouns do not.
    TRUE
  74. DEFINE DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOUNS.
    • THIS
    • THAT
    • THESE
    • THOSE
    • They can be used by themselves.
    • That is the candy she likes best.

    • If they are used preceding nouns, they are considered adjectives.
    • That candy is her favorite.
  75. DEFINE RELATIVE PRONOUN.
    • WHO
    • WHOM
    • WHICH
    • WHAT
    • THAT
    • These words are considered relative pronouns when they introduce subordinate clauses.
    • In other words, they are used to "relate" the clause to the rest of the sentence.

    • EX:The girl who called your name is still looking for you. [Who is nominative case and is used when the pronoun is the subject of its clause.]
    • EX:To whom should I present the award this term? [Whom is objective case and is used when the pronoun has an object function such as object of the preposition.]
  76. WHAT IN THE NAME OF THE THE LORD ALMIGHTY IS AN ANTECEDENT?
    The word to which a pronoun refers or for which it stands is called its antecedent.

    EX: Sharon has done more than her share. [Sharon is the antecedent of her.]

    • EX: The campers took their food with them. [Campers is the antecedent
    • of their and them.]
  77. WHAT USUALLY ENDS IN "LY"?
    ADJECTIVES OR ADVERBS?
    • Adverbs often end in -ly.
    • It would be simple if that was always the case, but it is not.

    There are many adverbs that do not end in ly (run fast, hold tight, arrive late, etc.)

    Also, there are some adjectives that end in -ly (daily exercise, friendly group, early bird, etc.)
  78. What can you say about a society which says that God is dead and Elvis is alive?

    WHAT ARE THE PREDICATE ADJECTIVES?
    • DEAD
    • ALIVE

    A predicate adjective is the name given to an adjective that follows a linking verb and modifies (i.e. refers back to) the subject of the sentence. 

    • EXAMPLE:
    • Lee      seems      drunk. 
    • subject               predicate adjective
    • (The linking verb is "seems".)
  79. DEFINE PREDICATE ADJECTIVE.
    A predicate adjective is the name given to an adjective that follows a linking verb and modifies (i.e. refers back to) the subject of the sentence. 

    • Everything is funny as long as it is happening to somebody else.          
    • EVERYTHING subject         
    • FUNNY predicate adjective
    • (The linking verb is "is".)  

    • If you look good, you don't need a purpose in life.            
    • YOU subject      
    • GOOD predicate adjective
    • (The linking verb is "look".)
  80. HOW TO USE BAD AND BADLY.
    • Bad is an adjective.
    • Badly is an adverb.
    • Since the sensory verbs like feel, smell, taste, and sound are followed by predicate adjectives, it is correct to say feel bad, smell bad, taste bad, and sound bad.

    • EX: I smell bad after my workout. (sensory verb)
    • I felt bad about missing my doctor's appointment. (sensory verb)
    • Did the orchestra sound bad with so many people absent? (sensory verb)

    • My nephew throws the ball badly. (Action verb requires an adverb.)
    • The actor performed badly and received a poor review. (Action verb requires an adverb.)
  81. HOW YOU YOU USE GOOD VS WELL?
    • Good is always an adjective.
    • It should not be used as an adverb with an action verb.
    • Never say, "You read really good, Mary" or "You hit the ball good, Liz."

    • Well is more versatile. It may be used as an adjective or an adverb.
    • "He feels well again after his illness" or "All is well" or "The vocalist sang well."

    Note: It is the incorrect usage of the word good that will stand out as nonstandard usage and will reflect badly on you.
  82. Most adjectives and adverbs of one syllable form their comparative and superlative degrees by adding _______ AND ______.
    -er and -est. [Ex.- short,shorter, shortest and late, later, latest]

    • COMPARATIVE = COMPARE
    • SUPERLATIVE = SUPER
  83. DEFINE coordinating conjunctions
    • Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses.
    • F = for
    • A = and
    • N = nor
    • B = but
    • O = or
    • Y = yet
    • S = so
  84. WHEN TO USE A SEMICOLON?
    • REVIEW THIS THERE ARE 5 BUT HERE IS TWO. 
    • Used between independent clauses that are not joined by and, but, for, or, nor, yet, or so in a compound sentence. (This is done to avoid a run-on or comma splice sentence.)

    Used between items in a series if the items contain commas.(NY, NY; LA,CA; SF, CA)
  85. WHEN TO USE A COLON.
    Used before a list of items, especially after expressions like as follows and the following.

    Used before a long, formal statement or quotation.

    Used between the hour and the minute when you write the time.

    Used between chapter and verse in referring to passages from the Bible.

    Used between volume and number or between volume and page number of a periodical.

    Used after the salutation of a business letter.
  86. WHEN TO USE A COMMA?
          • Used to separate items in a series.






          • Used to separate two or more adjectives that modify the same noun.






          • Used before andbutornorforyet, or so when they join independent clauses in a compound sentence.








          • Used to set off nonessential clauses and nonessential participial phrases.






          • Used after certain introductory elements such as wellyesno, introductory phrases and clauses, etc.






          • Used to set off expressions that interrupt the sentence such as appositives, words of direct address, and parenthetical expressions.






          • Used to separate items in dates and addresses in a sentence.






          • Used after the salutation of a friendly letter and after the closing of any letter.
  87. WHEN TO CAPITALIZE?
    • Capitalize the first word in every sentence.
    • Capitalize the pronoun I and the interjection O.
    • Capitalize proper nouns and adjectives.
    • Capitalize the names of individual persons.
    • Capitalize geographical names like countries, states, counties, townships, cities, continents, islands, peninsulas, mountains, canyons, plains, forests, parks, dams, oceans, gulfs, lakes, streets, roads, etc.
    • Capitalize titles.
    • Capitalize the parts of a compound word as if each part stood alone (Italian-American, pre-Victorian)
  88. T OR F 
    Drop the final e before a suffix beginning with a vowel (caring, bridal, etc.)
    TRUE
  89. T OR F 
    Keep the final e before a suffix beginning with a consonant (lovely, placement, hopeful, etc.)
    TRUE
  90. T OR F
    Double the final consonant before a suffix that begins with a vowel if both of the following conditions exist: (1) the word has only one syllable or is accented on the last syllable; (2) the word ends in a single consonant preceded by a single vowel (swimming, sunning, etc.)
    TRUE
  91. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
    ALREADY AND ALL READY
    • already - previously
    • all ready - all prepared or in readiness
  92. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
    ALTOGETHER AND ALL TOGETHER
    • altogether - entirely
    • all together - everyone in one group or place
  93. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CAPITAL AND CAPITOL.
    capital - a city which is the seat of government of a country or state; also money used to carry on a business

    capitol - building in which a legislature meets.THINK ROTUNDA IS ROUND IN CAPITOL BLDG.
  94. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ITS AND IT'S
    its - possessive of it

    it's - contraction of it is
  95. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LOOSE AND LOSE.
    loose - free; unfastened; not tight

    lose - to suffer the loss of; not to win
  96. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHO'S AND WHOSE.
    who's - contraction of who is or who has 

    • whose - possessive form of who
    • (Whose book is this?)
  97. Jeanne and I have known each other literally since birth, she is one of my best friends.

    what is wrong with this sentence?
    It's a comma splice. 

    • To fix:
    • it either replace the colon with a semicolon or ",and" instead of the comma.
  98. THE 4 POINTS THAT ARE ON THE RUBRIC FOR THE WRITING PART OF THE TEST ARE.....


    BTW...5 PARAGRAPHS OR MORE!
    • FOCUS
    • SUPPORT (ELABORATION)
    • ORGANIZATION
    • GRAMMAR (& CONVENTIONS OF ENGLISH USAGE)

    • -A fully developed composition should be about five paragraphs or more.
    • -Each  paragraphs will  have 5 sentences. ----State your position in an introductory paragraph.
    • -Follow it with about three full paragraphs, each of which will discuss one point of support.
    • -If you can determine these points before you start the essay, you will have a good start.
    • -End with a concluding paragraph.

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