H320

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run2death2
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237808
Filename:
H320
Updated:
2013-09-29 23:36:50
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Steve Reed
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Module 1 Exam
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  1. Federal legislation enacted in response to post World War II proclamation of a shortage of hospitals and health providers. Hill Burton provided funding to build hospitals in rural areas. The act influenced the distribution of hospitals by creating financial incentives to place them in rural and other underserved areas where they might not otherwise have been established.
    HILL BURTON ACT OF 1946
  2. Required government bodies aided by consumer groups to review and approve or disapprove health facility capital expenditures, both for new and replacement capital projects.
    Certificate of Need
  3. A classification of hospital that indicates a facility, usually a not-for-profit hospital that is developed in and operated by the community.
    Community Hopsital
  4. A hospital that is organized as a legal, tax-paying entity, and financed by shareholders who expect some return on their investment (also called proprietary).
    For Profit Hospital
  5. A hospital unaffiliated with any other or with a hospital system.
    free standing hospital
  6. Hospital structured as a 501 (c) (3) organization under the IRS code. Profit from operations are reinvested in the organization.
    Not for Profit Hospital
  7. A government-supported hospital, at the federal, state, or local level.
    public hospital
  8. A tertiary or higher-level hospital, including academic health centers, that participates in the on-site training of physicians and other types of health personnel.
    Teaching Hopsital
  9. The only general, acute care hospital available in a service area.
    SOLE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
  10. A for-profit hospital that has physicians as investor / owners.
    SYNDICATED HOSPITAL
  11. The organization of a number of hospitals, from several to many, into a system that provides direction and administrative services from a central office.
    Hospital System
  12. Rural hospitals that meet certain eligibility requirements to receive cost-based Medicare reimbursement.
    CRITICAL ACCESS HOSPITALS (CAHS)
  13. THREE CENTRAL LINES OF AUTHORITY FOR HOSPITAL ORGANIZATION:
    • 1. Medical Staff
    • 2. Administration
    • 3. Board
  14. HOSPITAL LONG TERM DEBT FINANCING METHODS:
    • 1. Debt Financing-not for profits
    • 2. Stock -proprietary
  15. Development of a continuum of care, from health promotion to palliative care.
    HORIZONTAL INTEGRATION
  16. A hospital extends its reach to capture and control more services that lead to inpatient hospitalization (without necessarily expanding its continuum of care: for example, hiring primary care physicians).
    VERTICAL INTEGRATION
  17. Provide services targeted towards a specific disease or major human function / system (for example, an orthopedics hospital).
    SPECIALITY HOSPITAL
  18. Combined federal and state program that provides additional funding to hospitals that treat a higher percentage of Medicare and / or Medicaid patients.
    DISPROPORTIONATE SHARE HOSPITAL PAYMENTS (DSH)
  19. A not-for-profit hospital is organized as tax-free under the Internal Revenue Service tax code section 501 (C) (3).
    501 (C) (3) HOSPITAL
  20. A statistical average for the number of days a patient stays, as an inpatient, in a hospital.
    AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY (ALOS)
  21. A payment system used in managed care in which the provider is paid afixed, predetermined amount on a regular basis (usually monthly) for the provision of all covered benefits to the insured individual.
    CAPITATION
  22. An ideal view of systematic and continuous health services needed and rendered, beginning with healthy prenatal care and continuing to provision of the appropriate level of care until the end of a life.
    CONTINUUM OF CARE
  23. An organization that delivers and manages health services under a risk- based arrangement. HMOs usually receive a monthly premium or capitation payment for each enrollee that is based on a projection of what the typical patient will cost.
    HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION
  24. Education and / or other supportive services that assist individuals or groups to adopt healthy behaviors and /or reduce health risks and increase self-care skills.
    HEALTH PROMOTION
  25. A type of HMO where the organization contracts with independent physician practices to provide healthcare for the enrollees. Providers are usually paid on a fee-for-service basis.
    INDEPENDENT PRACTICE ASSOCIATION (IPA)
  26. A network of health services that integrates providers at various levels of care, as well as a range or continuum of health services in a coordinated fashion.
    INTEGRATED DELIVERY NETWORK / SYSTEM
  27. An umbrella term for a variety of health plans, each of which at some level integrates the financing and delivery of care to an enrolled population.
    MANAGED CARE
  28. Basic or general care, traditionally provided by family practice, pediatric, and internal medicine providers.
    PRIMARY CARE
  29. An intervention that reduces the risk of developing a disease or disorder.
    PRIMARY DISEASE PREVENTION
  30. The degree of which the process of medical care increases the probability of outcomes desired by patients and reduces the probability of undesired outcomes, given the state of medical knowledge.
    QUALITY OF CARE
  31. An intervention that slows the progress of a disease or disorder.
    SECONDARY DISEASE PREVENTION
  32. An intervention that may or may not slow the progress of a complicated disorder or disease but may ameliorate the individual’s condition.
    TERTIARY DISEASE PREVENTION
  33. Averting the onset of disease through such preventive measures as health screenings and maintaining good health practices in physical activity and nutrition.
    DISEASE PREVENTION
  34. The change in focus on categories of disease as environmental and other disease agents are conquered. The epidemiologic transition has moved from a focus on communicable diseases to a focus on chronic diseases.
    EPIDIMIOLOGIC TRANSITION
  35. Education and / or other supportive services that assist individuals or groups to adopt healthy behaviors and /or reduce health risks and increase self-care skills.
    HEALTH PROMOTION
  36. Emphasizes the health of a population in the areas of occupational health and safety, environmental health, food safety, and oral health. The primary responsibility for health protection resides in the public health sector.
    HEALTH PROTECTION
  37. An intervention that reduces the risk of developing a disease or disorder.
    PRIMARY DISEASE PREVENTION
  38. An intervention that slows the progress of a disease or disorder.
    SECONDARY DISEASE PREVENTION
  39. An intervention that may or may not slow the progress of a complicated disorder or disease but may ameliorate the individual’s condition.
    TERTIARY DISEASE PREVENTION
  40. Care for episodic and chronic conditions and for health maintenance. Ambulatory care is typically provided in a non-institutional setting; however, a hospital stay of less than 24 hours is considered “ambulatory”.
    AMBULATORY CARE
  41. The use of a health services provider to screen access to specialists by enrollees in some types of managed care plans.
    GATEKEEPING
  42. An advanced practice nurse, sometimes referred to as a mid-level provider or practitioner.
    NURSE PRACTITIONER
  43. A mid-level practitioner trained in the medical model of providing health services.
    PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT
  44. Basic or general care, traditionally provided by family practice, pediatric, and internal medicine providers.
    PRIMARY CARE
  45. Includes special ambulatory medical services and common-place inpatient hospital acute care. A secondary care visit can be to a hospital outpatient department or emergency room, a diagnostic center, ambulatory surgery center, physician specialist in his/her office, or other ambulatory provider.
    SECONDARY CARE
  46. A way to measure which populations are using particular health services and to what extent.
    UTILIZATION OF SERVICES
  47. A specialty center for childbirth that generally provide a more comfortable and home-like atmosphere (less institutional) than a hospital environment.
    BIRTHING CENTER
  48. Highly specialized care administered to patients who have complicated medical conditions or require high-risk pharmaceutical treatments or surgery by specialists and sub-specialists in a setting that houses high-technology and intensive care services.
    TERTIARY CARE
  49. High levels of specialized care provided predominantly at academic health centers (AHCs).
    QUATERNARY CARE
  50. A tertiary level or higher hospital, including AHCs, that participate in the on-site training of physicians and other types of health personnel.
    TEACHING HOSPITAL
  51. Research related to the care and treatment of patients with illness or disease.
    CLINICAL RESEARCH
  52. A functional assessment scale of the ability of an individual to perform key activities, such as toileting, transferring from a bed to a chair, dressing, and eating.
    ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING (ADL)
  53. A form of long-term care provided during the work day, then the patient is return to the usual source of care / residence.
    ADULT DAY CARE
  54. An optional Medicaid benefit that allows states to design and implement services at a community level to deter or prevent more costly institutionalization for vulnerable populations.
    HOME AND COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICES (HCBS)
  55. Personal care, housekeeping, and chore services or health services, provided in a patient’s home. These services are furnished under a plan established and periodically reviewed by a physician.
    HOME HEALTH CARE
  56. A functional assessment scale that measures the ability of individuals to function independently by determining their ability to perform such activities as using the telephone, doing light housework, and managing money.
    INSTRUMENTAL ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING (IADLs)
  57. Services that address the health, social, and personal care needs of individuals who have never developed or have lost the capacity for self-care on a permanent or intermittent basis.
    LONG TERM CARE
  58. A formal waiver by CMS providing permission to offer a unique set of services to a subset of the Medicaid population.
    MEDICAID WAIVER PROGRAM
  59. Care available for short periods to an impaired person being cared for in a family setting. Respite care allows family members to get temporary relief from the constant demands of caring for an impaired individual.
    RESPITE CARE
  60. The use of income and assets to pay for health services in order to achieve a level of means that makes one eligible for certain social and health services particularly Medicaid services.
    SPEND-DOWN
  61. An organization that provides both medical and social services in an integrated delivery system to frail elderly persons.
    SOCIAL HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION (SHMO)
  62. “End of life” or care offered during a person’s terminal illness when no other therapeutic treatments hold promise.
    PALLATIVE CARE
  63. Ethical issue of whether and when individuals may choose to end their life when their functional status is compromised or the pain from a terminal condition becomes unmanageable.
    RIGHT TO DIE
  64. A document that spells out a patient’s desires and wishes as it relates to medical providers rendering care and treatment when it is uncertain as to the efficacy of additional therapeutic treatments.
    LIVING WILL
  65. Provided to ease pain, suffering and stress of a terminal illness when no other medical or surgical interventions are available to ameliorate the condition.
    HOSPICE CARE

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