Ap lit lit terms 51-100

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aronlaszik
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Ap lit lit terms 51-100
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2013-10-13 19:04:28
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Ap lit terms 51 100
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Ap lit lit terms 51-100
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  1. Confidant
    (e):  the protagonist’s intimate. Male:  “confidant”; female “confidante”
  2. Conflict
    • :
    •  the struggle between opposing forces.  A conflict can be an internal struggle within
    • a character, or external struggle brought on by something outside the character
  3. Connotation
    • :
    •  the implied or associative meaning of a word.
  4. Consonance
    • :
    •  repetition of a consonant sound in any
    • position.
  5. Convention
    :  the accepted form or style
  6. Couplet
    • :  two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme
    • and are written in the same meter, or pattern of stressed and unstressed
    • syllables
  7. Denotation
    • :
    •  the literal meaning of a word.
  8. Denouement
    • :
    •  resolution, outcome replicating thought.
  9. Deus Ex Machina:
    • The “god machine.”  A contrived ending to a
    • story or drama.
  10. Dialogue
    • :
    •  conversation between two or more people.
  11. Diction
    • :
    •  the word choices made by a writer.
  12. Didactic
    • - having the primary purpose of teaching
    • or instructing.
  13. Dissonance
    • :
    •  harsh, inharmonious, or discordant sounds.
  14. Doppleganger
    • :
    •  mysterious double.
  15. Dramatic Perspective
    • :
    •  teller presents just the facts.
  16. Elegy
    • :
    •  a formal poem presenting a meditation on death or another
    • solemn theme.  A dirge is a similar term that is a funeral song of lamentation
  17. Ellipsis
    • :
    •  the omission of a word or phrase which is
    • grammatically necessary but can be deduced from the context. (Some people
    • prefer cats; others, dogs.)
  18. Enjambment
    • :
    •  running over of a sentence from one line or
    • stanza to another.
  19. Epic
    • :
    • a long narrative poem
    • written in elevated style which presents the adventures of characters of high
    • position and episodes that are important to the history of a race or nation.
  20. Epigram
    • :
    •  a unified, direct poem with a sharp or
    • singular point
  21. Epigraph
    • :
    •  a saying or statement on the title page of a work, or used
    • as a heading for a chapter or other section of work.
  22. Epilogue
    • :  the concluding section added to a novel,
    • play, or long poem
  23. Epiphany
    • :
    •  a moment of sudden revelation or insight.
  24. Epitaph
    • :
    •  an inscription on a tombstone or burial place.
  25. Epithet
    • :
    •  a term used to point out a characteristic of a person.
    • Homeric epithets are often compound adjectives (“swift-footed Achilles”) that
    • become an almost formulaic part of a name. 
    • Epithets can be abusive or offensive but are not so by definition. For
    • example, athletes may be proud of their given epithets (“The Rocket”).
  26. Eulogy
    • :
    •  a formal speech praising a person who has
    • died.
  27. Euphemism
    • :
    •  an indirect, less offensive way of saying something that is considered
    • unpleasant.
  28. Euphony
    • :
    •  soft, pleasing sounds.  The opposite of cacophony.
  29. Exclamatory Sentence
    • :
    • a sentence expressing
    • strong feeling, usually punctuated with an exclamation mark
  30. Existentialism
    • :
    •  a philosophy that focuses on the individual
    • human being’s experience of, recognition of, and triumph over the meaningless
    • of existence.  Jean Paul Sartre promoted
    • the idea that humans are born into a moral and metaphysical void.  People are responsible for shaping their own
    • existence
  31. Expletive
    • :
    •  an interjection to lend emphasis; sometimes, a
    • profanity
  32. Fable
    • :
    •  a brief story that leads to a moral, often using animals as
    • characters.
  33. Fantasy
    • :
    •  a story that concerns an unreal world or contains unreal
    • characters; a fantasy may be merely whimsical, or it may present a serious
    • point.
  34. Farce
    • :
    •  crude, often obscene literary genre.
  35. Fiction
    • :  writing that is the product of the author’s
    • imagination, an invention rather than actual history or fact
  36. Figurative Language
    • :
    •  language employing one or more figures of speech. (simile,
    • metaphor, imagery, etc.)
  37. Flashback
    • :  the
    • insertion of an earlier event into the normal chronological order of a
    • narrative.
  38. Foil
    • : character’s illuminator through
    • contrast.
  39. Foot
    • the basic unit of rhythmic measurement in a line of poetry
  40. Foreshadowing
    • :
    •  the presentation of a material in such a way that the reader
    • is prepared for what is to come later in the work.
  41. Free Verse:
    • poetry
    • with no regular rhyme or rhythm.
  42. Genre
    • :
    •  a major category or type of literature.
  43. Gothic
    • :  Literature which calls to mind gloom,
    • mystery, and fear
  44. Gothic novel
    • :  A type of novel characterized by mystery,
    • horror and the supernatural, often with haunted castles. Secret passage ways,
    • ghosts, etc.
  45. Heroic Couplet:
    • two rhymed lines in iambic pentameter that are
    • a complete thought.
  46. Homily
    • :  a
    • sermon, or a moralistic lecture.
  47. Hubris
    • :
    •  excessive pride or arrogance that results in the downfall of
    • the protagonist of a tragedy.
  48. Hyperbole
    • :
    • intentional exaggeration
    • to create an effect.
  49. Idiom
    • :
    •  an expression in a given language that cannot be understood
    • from the literal meaning of the words in the expression; or, a regional speech
    • or dialect.
  50. Idyllic
    • :  an adjective to describe a description of a
    • picturesque country life, an idealized story of happy innocence.  Also referred to as Pastoral.

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