Card Set Information

2013-11-04 23:48:39
Introduction networking

Introduction to Networking midterm, part II
Show Answers:

  1. Top to bottom, what are the 4 layers of the TCP/IP model?
    Application layer, transport layer, Internet layer, and network interface layer.
  2. What layer of the TCP/IP model corresponds to the Application and Presentation layers of the OSI model?
  3. What is the OSI model?
    A framework and reference model to explain how different networking technologies work together and interact; stands for Open Systems Interconnection.
  4. In what layer of the OSI model do translation, compression, and encryption take place?
  5. What does the Physical layher of the OSI model do?
    It defines cable standards and other standards, such as wireless standards and fiber optic standards. Data here are converted into 1s and 0s that can be transmitted over various types of transmission media.
  6. What does the Data Link layer of the OSI model do?
    The layer is concerned with moving data from one computer to another. Namely, it moves frames from one computer or device to the adjacent one; a MAC address or a physical address is needed for this.
  7. What are the 2 sublayers of the Data Link layer and what do they do?
    Logical Link Control (for facilitating communications betweeen the Network and the Physical layer, as well as address notification and error correction); and Media Access Control (for determining which computer has access to the network media at any given time; also for determining where one frame ends and another begins.)
  8. What does the Network layer of the OSI model do?
    This layer moves data, in the form of packets, from one end of the network to the other. Routing takes place at this layer.
  9. What is a media converter?
    A device that converts one type of media to another type, for example fiber to copper. It allows for more than one different type of technology on the same network.
  10. What is more "intelligent": a bridge or a hub?
    A bridge, which is intended to break networks up into smaller sections.