CO104

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249113
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CO104
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2013-12-03 16:55:06
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CO104
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CO104
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  1. What is a MOA?
    • Airspace set aside for military aircraft to accomplish maneuvers in the lateral, vertical and horizontal planes.
    • Controlled by ATC, using IFR rules
  2. What is an alert area?
    airspace with defined dimensions which contains a high volume of military or civilian pilot training or an unusual type of arial activity
  3. Potential energy is directly related to what?
    altitude
  4. Kinetic energy is directly related to what?
    airspeed
  5. What does trading energy do besides conserving energy?
    • Takes less time and distance
    • Saves fuel
    • Demonstrates proper judgement
  6. How is potential energy converted to kinetic energy?
    • Trade altitude for airspeed
    • Aircraft pitch angle must be steep enough to allow the airspeed to constantly but safely build
  7. What is the set up for an "altitude for airspeed" conversion?
    • Full power dive
    • Canopy bow on horizon (10° nose low)
    • 50 knots/1000' altitude lost
  8. How and why would you trade "airspeed for altitude?"
    • If you need a slower airspeed prior to entering a maneuver, trade extra speed for increased altitude
    • PCL - no change
    • Level off at desired airspeed and begin maneuver
  9. What is a mission profile?
    an outline of the sequence of events from time you leave the building to go to the aircraft until you return to the building after landing
  10. G-loading effects on energy:
    • Pulling Gs and descending at low power or losing airspeed, you are loosing energy
    • Accelerating or climbing with greater than one G, you are not gaining the most energy possible
  11. What is an area profile?
    The sequence of maneuvers that you will perform in the working area
  12. First energy management rule:
    Sequence area profile maneuvers so the each maneuver builds, maintains, or loses energy as required to do the next maneuver
  13. Second energy management rule:
    • Try to maintain a "working" energy level during your area profile until you are ready to depart the area.
    • Conserving energy
  14. Energy gainers:
    • The aircraft completes the maneuver at a higher total energy state than at the start of the maneuver
    • Power-on stalls
    • Nose high recoveries
    • Climbing aerobatics
  15. Energy neutral:
    • The aircraft completes the maneuver at roughly the same total energy state as at the start of the maneuver
    • Inverted recoveries
  16. Energy losers:
    • The aircraft completes the maneuver at a lower total energy state than at the start of the maneuver.
    • Traffic pattern stalls
    • ELP stalls
    • OCF recoveries
    • Spins
    • Nose-low recoveries
    • Slow flight
    • Descending high G aerobatics
  17. What is "working" energy level?
    • altitude/airspeed combination that will allow you to trade altitude and airspeed to accomplish any maneuver and stay within the altitude block
    • Middle of block
    • 180-200 KIAS working energy level
  18. If you plan to enter and leave an area at the bottom, how would you design your mission profile?
    • Energy gaining
    • Neutral
    • Energy losing
  19. If you plan to enter and leave at the top of an area, how would you design your mission profile?
    • Losing
    • Neutral
    • Gaining
  20. What are the four area orientation questions?
    • 1. Where am I?
    • 2. If I start the maneuver from this position, can I safely finish it, stay within my area boundaries, and set up for another maneuver?
    • 3. Should I reposition the aircraft before this maneuver or modify my profile and do a different maneuver?
    • 4. What is the next maneuver in my profile that I will do from my projected aircraft position?
  21. What are the four area orientation concepts?
    • Know where you are
    • Know the boundaries of your present working area
    • Knowing the flight paths and required airspace for planned profile maneuvers
    • Knowing and compensating for winds at altitude in your area
  22. What happens if clouds obscure the center of the working area?
    • Use ground references near the center of the largest amount of clear air in the area
    • Use ground references that define the area boundaries and work between them
    • Use you EHSI to stay between the radials and DME
  23. What three steps should you take when compensating for winds at altitude?
    • Know the direction and velocity of the wind in your area
    • Displace your "working" area reference point upwind from you area's geographical center
    • Fly your maneuvers into the wind and upwind from your "working reference"
  24. Power-on stall parameters:
    • 30-60% torque
    • 1500' above floor
    • 3NM ahead; 3NM in direction of planned turn
    • Energy gainer
  25. Nose high recovery parameters:
    • Power as required
    • 2000' above; 1000' below
    • 3NM in all directions
    • Energy gainer
  26. Nose low recovery parameters:
    • Power as required
    • 1000' above; 2000' below
    • 3 NM in all directions
    • Energy loser
  27. Inverted recovery parameters:
    • Power as required
    • 2000' above and below
    • 3NM in all directions
    • Can be gainer, loser or neutral depending on what pitch angle when started
  28. OCF recovery parameters:
    • Airspeed/power as required
    • 1000' above; 3500' below
    • 1NM ahead, 1NM in direction of turn
    • Energy loser
  29. Spin recovery parameters:
    • Airspeed/power as required
    • 1000' above, 3500' below
    • 1NM ahead, 1NM in direction of turn
    • Energy loser
  30. What gives students the most trouble doing traffic pattern stalls?
    • Not planning enough altitude and area to complete the stall series
    • Failing to check area orientation after each individual stall
  31. Traffic pattern stall parameters:
    • Final turn stalls - 120 KIAS; IDLE
    • Landing attitude stalls -  5-10 KIAS above final approach speed; IDLE
    • 2500' below
    • 3NM in all directions
    • Energy loser
  32. Power-off/ELP stall parameters:
    • Clean glide: 125 KIAS
    • High key to low key: 120 KIAS
    • Low key to runway: 120 KIAS
    • 4-6% torque
    • Full stall series may take up to 4000'
    • Energy loser
  33. Slow flight parameters:
    • 80-85 KIAS flaps LDG
    • 85-90 KIAS flaps TO
    • 90-95 KIAS no flaps
    • Power as required
    • 500' above and below
    • 2NM ahead; 2NM in direction of first turn
    • Energy neutral if done from a traffic pattern stall
    • Energy loser otherwise
  34. What is area orientation?
    tells you where to do a maneuver

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