Patient Assessment Skin 4

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Author:
kyleannkelsey
ID:
249425
Filename:
Patient Assessment Skin 4
Updated:
2013-11-27 20:23:07
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Patient Assessment Skin
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Description:
Patient Assessment Skin 4
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  1. What should you suggest to a patient if they come in presenting with Measles?
    See a PCP
  2. What should you suggest to a patient if they come in presenting with Varicella?
    See a PCP
  3. What is the primary risk factor form Chicken pox?
    Exposure to infected individual
  4. What is the contagious period for Chicken pox?
    2 days before rash onset to when all the vesicles have crusted (~4-6 days after rash onset)
  5. What is shingles?
    Reactivation of varicella zoster virus causing painful blistering rash associated with numbness and tingling, commonly found on one side of the body
  6. A patient comes in saying that they have had headache, malaise and aches/pains followed by an erythematous rash/pruritus on their face and trunk. What might you suspect?
    Chicken pox
  7. What is impetigo?
    Cutaneous bacterial infection
  8. Is Impetigo primary or secondary?
    Both
  9. What species usually cause Impetigo?
    Staphylococcus aureus or group A beta hemolytic streptococcus pyogenes
  10. Where are Impetigo lesions usually found?
    Around the mouth and nose
  11. Describe the lesions of impetigo:
    Erythematous, pruritic, honey or brown and crusting, vesicles that rupture and leave a crust
  12. If a patient comes in with suspected Impetigo, what should you suggest?
    See PCP
  13. What are the risk factors for Impetigo?
    Warm temp/high humidity, skin breakage, preexisting skin disorder, poor hygiene, cramped living conditions
  14. A patient comes in with an erythematous rash near their nose, it is brown and crusting. You observe a number of vesicles on the rash and that the person hasn’t has poor hygeine. What do you suspect?
    Impetigo
  15. (True/False) Fungal infections of the skin are often transmitted by inanimate objects.
    True
  16. What is Tinea cruris also called?
    Jock itch
  17. What is Tinea corporis also called?
    Ringworm
  18. What are the risk factors for Candidiasis skin infection?
    Steroid use, occlusive clothing, warm/moist climate and obesity
  19. What are the signs and symptoms of Tinea Pedis?
    Erythema, scaling, erosion, vesicles, pustules and Pruritus of the foot
  20. What are the signs and symptoms of Tinea Corporis?
    Erythemia, scaling, plaques, vescicles, pustules and pruritus
  21. What are the signs and symptoms of Tinea Cruris?
    Bilateral, scaling, plaques (hyper-pigmented red to brown), papules, pustules, pruritus
  22. Where are most candidiasis infections found at?
    Intertriginous areas: Between toes, Groin, Armpit and under breasts
  23. What are the signs and symptoms of a candidiasis infection?
    Erythemia, Papules, Pustules, Erosions, Fissures, Dry skin/scaling, itching and burning
  24. If the causative factor unclear is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    No
  25. If the patient has experienced one unsuccessful initial treatment, or worsening of condition is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    No
  26. If a patient has a fungal infection on the foot, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    Yes
  27. If a patient has involvement of nails, scalp, face, mucous membranes or genitalia, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    No
  28. If a patient is experiencing constipation, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    Yes
  29. If a patient has signs of possible secondary bacterial infection, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    No
  30. If a patient has oozing purulent material, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    No
  31. If a patient has excessive and continuous exudation, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    No
  32. If a patient has 2 locations of infection, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    Yes
  33. If a patient has an extensive, seriously inflamed or debilitating fungal infection, is it still OK to use self-care?
    No
  34. What co-morbid conditions are not appropriate for self-treatment of fungal infections?
    Immune deficiency and Diabetes
  35. If a patient has rhinitis, is it still OK to use self-care for a fungal infection?
    Yes

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