Therapeutics Female 3

Card Set Information

Author:
kyleannkelsey
ID:
250051
Filename:
Therapeutics Female 3
Updated:
2013-12-01 18:56:05
Tags:
Therapeutics Female
Folders:
Therapeutics,Female,3
Description:
Therapeutics Female 3
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user kyleannkelsey on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. What populations are at risk for Toxic shock syndrome?
    Tampon use for more than 8 hours, high absorbency tampon use, diabetes, alcoholism, minor trauma, recent surgery
  2. What is the most common bacterial infection?
    UTI
  3. What bacteria is implicated in most UTIs?
    E. coli
  4. How do UTIs develop?
    Normal vaginal flora is introduced to the urethra through sexual activity, foreign instrumentation or compromised immunity
  5. What are the signs and symptoms of a UTI?
    Urge to urinate, small frequent urination, burning, cloudy urine, strong urine smell, pelvic pain, blood in urine
  6. What are the risk factors for UTI?
    Female, sexual activity, post-menopause, se of spermicides/diaphragms, kidney stones, catheter, immunosuppression, Urinary tract abnormalities
  7. What non-pharmacological treatments are there for UTI?
    Drink lots of water, avoid coffee, alcohol and soft drinks, heating pad on abdomen
  8. What pharmacologic options are available for UTI treatment?
    Sodium Salicylate, Phenazopyridine and Methenamine
  9. What patients are at risk of Sodium Salicylate use for the treatment of UTI?
    Hypertensive, heart disease and GI issues
  10. What are the consequences of use for Sodium Salicylate?
    GI distress, rash, HA and dizziness
  11. What is the MOA for sodium salicylate in the treatment of UTI?
    Inhibits prostaglandin synthesis
  12. What is the MOA for Phenazopyridine?
    Azo dye that acts as a local anesthetic in the urinary tract
  13. What is the recommended dose of Phenazopyridine for the treatment of UTIs?
    100-200mg TID after meals for 2 days
  14. Is Phenazopyridine usually used alone or in combination?
    Combination with an antibiotic
  15. What are the consequences of use for Phenazopyridine?
    Headache/dizziness and stomach cramps (well tolerated)
  16. What populations are at risk for taking Phenazopyridine?
    Renally impaired
  17. What should you counsel patients using Phenazopyridine on?
    Urine will be dark orange
  18. What is the MOA of Methenamine for the treatment of UTIs?
    Metabolized to ammonia and formaldehyde in the urine, formaldehyde has anti-bacterial properties
  19. What are the consequences of use for Methenamine?
    Pruritis, N/V (large doses can also irritate the bladder)
  20. What patients are at risk when taking Methenamine?
    Gout, hepatic impairment
  21. What is the safety and effectiveness rating for Cranberry in the treatment of UTI?
    Likely safe and possibly effective AT PREVENTION
  22. Is Cranberry effective in the treatment of a UTI?
    No, useful only for prevention
  23. What is the MOA of cranberry in the prevention of UTI?
    Proanthocyanadins in cranberry wrap around bacteria and prevent them from adhering to the urinary wall
  24. Does Cranberry acidify the urine?
    No
  25. What are the consequences of use for Cranberry in treatment of UTI?
    Large intake may cause GI distress
  26. What populations are at risk when using cranberry in the treatment of UTI?
    Prone to kidney stones, aspirin allergy, diabetics
  27. Define overactive bladder:
    bladder has problems storing urine leading to urgency and incontinence
  28. What are the two main type of overactive bladder?
    Stress and Urge
  29. What proportion of women have overactive bladder?
    50% in nursing homes, 10-70% in the community
  30. What are the signs and symptoms of Overactive bladder?
    Sudden urge to urinate, Nocturia, frequent urination, involuntary urination
  31. What is the definition of frequent urination?
    >8/day
  32. What are the at risk groups for Overactive bladder?
    Age, pregnancy, obesity, high impact exercise, diuretic use
  33. What are the non-pharmacological treatments for overactive bladder?
    Weight loss, fluid restriction, scheduled bathroom breaks, proper diuretic use, avoiding caffeine/alcohol, kegels
  34. What drugs are available for the treatment of Overactive Bladder?
    Oxybutynin
  35. What is the MOA of Oxybutynin?
    Inhibits ACHE on smooth muscle, direct antispasmodic effect
  36. What dose of Oxybutynin would be recommended for the treatment of Overactive bladder?
    3.9 mg/day (change patch every 4 days)
  37. What are the consequences of use for Oxybutynin in the treatment of Overactive bladder?
    Pruritus near application site, xerostomia, constipation, dizziness and drowsiness
  38. What groups are at risk when using Oxybutynin?
    Urinary retention, dementia, elderly, CV disease, GI issues, renal dysfunction
  39. What is the definition of menopause?
    Permanent end of fertility and menstruation, occurs 12 monthas after your last period
  40. What is the average age of menopause?
    51

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview