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Smaller set
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  1. What are the three types of intrinsic proofs?
    ethos, pathos, logos
  2. A fictional story meant to teach a moral lesson.
    Fable
  3. A rhetorical situation in which the people who are involved disagree about something; also "proof".
    Argument
  4. An interpretive framework used to make sense of an array of data or knowledge; also "ideology".
    Network of Interpretation
  5. The context of a rhetorical act; minimally made up of a rhetor, an issue, and an audience.
    Rhetorical Situation
  6. Proof that is found in the issue or the case.
    Logical proof (logos)
  7. Put the parts of a fully-developed Chreia (progymnasmata) in sequential order, as suggested by the textbook.
    • Step 1G. Encomium, or praise for author
    • Step 2D. Paraphrase of Saying
    • Step 3B. Causes/Reasons for Saying
    • Step 4H. Contrast
    • Step 5C. Comparison
    • Step 6E. Example
    • Step 7A. Testimony
    • Step 8F. Epilogue
  8. Greek term meaning the right time, opportunity, occasion, or season.
    Kairos
  9. A discourse that praises someone or something.
    Encomium
  10. A progymnasmata in which the rhetor elaborates on a famous event or saying; also a brief saying always attributed to a specific person.
    Chreia
  11. Any system of investigating issues.
    Heuristic
  12. The ancient art of saying a great deal about very little.
    Amplification
  13. Any well-known saying or bit of community wisdom; a brief saying NOT attributed to a specific person.
    Proverb
  14. Any statement or bit of knowledge commonly shared among an audience or community.
    Commonplace
  15. The context of a rhetorical act; minimally made up of a rhetor, an issue, and an audience.
    Rhetorical Situation
  16. Put the parts of a fully developed Common-place (progymnasmata) in sequential order, as suggested by the textbook.
    • Step 1E. Prologue
    • Step 2G. Contrary
    • Step 3H. Exposition
    • Step 4A. Comparison
    • Step 5F. Intention/Attack
    • Step 6D. Digression
    • Step 7B. Rejection of Pity
    • Step 8C. Reminder of relevant topics
  17. A common topic that requires rhetors to approach an issue with questions about the chance of change, now or in the future.
    Possibility
  18. A common topic that requires rhetors to approach an issue with comparative questions of size, magnitude, and value.
    Degree
  19. A common topic that requires rhetors to approach an issue with educated guesses about existence and extent of existence.
    Conjecture
  20. Means of invention useful for developing arguments drawn from specific arts such as politics or ethics.
    Special Topics
  21. A rhetor's way of life or reputation in the relevant community; also "ethos;" also a progymnasmata.
    Character
  22. Feature of English; indicates who is speaking or writing, and/or the relation of the user to hearers/readers and/or issues.
    Grammatical Person
  23. Feature of English; allows user to identify the subject with an actor in the sentence or to substitute some other word int he subject position.
    Verb Voice
  24. A rhetorical stance that creates less identification with the audience and less persuasive potential
    Formal Distance
  25. Dimension of situated ethos; the position of the rhetor to influence the ideology of participants in a rhetorical act.
    Situational
  26. What are the three major dimensions of situated ethos in any rhetorical situation?
    interpersonal, attitudinal, situational
  27. A progymnasmata that discusses the attributes or appearance of something or someone.
    Description
  28. A figure in which a rhetor creates a vivid scene.
    Enaregia
  29. Language that respects or glorifies.
    Honorific Language
  30. Greek term for emotions or passions
    Pathos
  31. Language that disparages or downplays
    Pejorative Language
  32. Put the parts of Arrangement in sequential order, as suggested by the textbook.
    • Step 1F. Exordium
    • Step 2C. Narrative
    • Step 3E. Partition
    • Step 4A. Confirmation
    • Step 5D. Refutation
    • Step 6B. Peroration
  33. Which of the following is/are true type(s) of peroration?
    • a. Summarize
    • b. Make emotional appeals
    • c. Enhance ethos
  34. The part of a discourse that elaborates arguments in support of a rhetor's position.
    Confirmation
  35. May summarize, arouse emotions, or enhance the rhetor's ethos; the final part of a discourse.
    Peroration
  36. States the issue and may supply a history of the issue; second part of a discourse.
    Narrative
  37. The first part of a discourse (Latin).
    Exordium
  38. A rhetor's proposition and proofs developed for use in a specific rhetorical situation.
    Case
  39. First part of discourse (Greek)
    Prooemium
  40. Makes the audience well-disposed, receptive, and attentive; the first part of a discourse (English).
    Introduction
  41. An ancient exercise wherein students copied and elaborate on the work of revered or admired authors.
    Imitation
  42. An ancient exercise wherein students imitated sense of a discourse in words the than those used by original author.
    Paraphrase

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