Security+ Transport Definitions

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Security+ Transport Definitions
2013-12-16 23:00:22
Security Transport Definitions
Security+ Transport Definitions
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  1. Transmission Control Protocol
    TCP provides reliable, ordered, error-checked delivery of a stream of octets between programs running on computers connected to a local area network, intranet or the public Internet. It resides at the transport layer.
  2. User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
    UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. UDP uses a simple transmission model with a minimum of protocol mechanism.[1] It has no handshaking dialogues, and thus exposes any unreliability of the underlying network protocol to the user's program. As this is normally IP over unreliable media, there is no guarantee of delivery, ordering or duplicate protection. UDP provides checksums for data integrity, and port numbers for addressing different functions at the source and destination of the datagram.
  3. File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
    FTP is a standard network protocol used to transfer files from one host to another host over a TCP-based network, such as the Internet.  FTP users may authenticate themselves using a clear-text sign-in protocol, normally in the form of a username and password, but can connect anonymously if the server is configured to allow it. For secure transmission that hides (encrypts) the username and password, and encrypts the content, FTP is often secured with SSL/TLS ("FTPS"). SSH File Transfer Protocol ("SFTP") is sometimes also used instead, but is technologically different.
  4. FTPS
    FTP data as it travels over the network using SSL encryption.
  5. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
    Transport Layer Security (TLS) and its predecessor, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), are cryptographic protocols which are designed to provide communication security over the Internet.
  6. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
    (SMTP) is an Internet standard for electronic mail (e-mail) transmission across Internet Protocol (IP) networks. SMTP uses TCP port 25.
  7. Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
    (SNMP) is an "Internet-standard protocol for managing devices on IP networks". Devices that typically support SNMP include routers, switches, servers, workstations, printers, modem racks and more. It is used mostly in network management systems to monitor network-attached devices for conditions that warrant administrative attention.
  8. SSH File Transfer Protocol (also Secure File Transfer Protocol, or SFTP)
    is a network protocol that provides file access, file transfer, and file management functionalist over any reliable data stream. This protocol assumes that it is run over a secure channel, such as SSH, that the server has already authenticated the client, and that the identity of the client user is available to the protocol.
  9. Secure Shell (SSH)
    (SSH) is a cryptographic network protocol for secure data communication, remote command-line login, remote command execution, and other secure network services between two networked computers that connects, via a secure channel over an insecure network, a server and a client (running SSH server and SSH client programs, respectively).
  10. WPA
    Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) and Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) are two security protocols and security certification programs developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to secure wireless computer networks. The Alliance defined these in response to serious weaknesses researchers had found in the previous system, WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy).