AOM/FOM Approach

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spqswa
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253826
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AOM/FOM Approach
Updated:
2014-01-02 15:52:47
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SWA
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AOM/FOM Approach
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  1. Normally what approach category does SWA B737 use?
    • C (121-140kts)
  2. When would SWA B737 use approach category "D" minima? What is the speed range?
    (141-165kts)

    • • Vref > 140 kt for other than Flaps 30 and Flaps 40 landings.
    • • Vtgt > 140 kt for RNAV (RNP) approaches with an RF leg on the final approach segment.

    • NOTE: For an RNAV (RNP) approach with an RF leg on the final approach segment, the max allowable speed on the final approach segment is 165 kt.
  3. What ATC approach speed assignment will we NOT accept?
    > 170 kts closer than 5 mi from the runway
  4. Below what altitude should you not make minor changes based on new ATC advised information? What are two examples of this type of information?
    1000 above TDZE

    1) ATC-assigned altimeter settings

    2) Tower gives new winds (new Vtgt)
  5. MCP altitude must be set to zero for all instrument approaches, except which ones?
    circle-to-land
  6. When should the MCP be set to zero for ILS Approaches?
    • • Cleared for the approach
    • • On a published segment of the approach
    • • VOR/LOC captured
    • • GS captured
  7. When should the MCP be set to zero for Non-precision approaches with vertical guidance?
    • • Cleared for the approach
    • • On a published segment of the approach
    • • LNAV is engaged
    • • Prior to GP intercept
    • • VNAV is engaged; VNAV PATH is verified
  8. When should the MCP be set to zero for Non-precision approaches without vertical guidance?
    • • Cleared for the approach
    • • On a published segment of the approach
    • • At the FAF altitude, if there are no restrictions inside of the FAF
    • • After compliance with stepdown restrictions inside of the FAF is ensured
  9. On approach, when should the PF position feet and hands on the aircraft controls?
    Prior to the final approach segment.
  10. When the autopilot is engaged, when should the PF guard the controls? Which controls?
    At lower altitudes (any time the flaps are extended for maneuvering, approach, or landing).

    Flight controls and thrust levers.
  11. (CL) Flap Maneuvering Speeds and (NG) with Flap Maneuvering Speeds Unavailable
    • CL/NG
    • 0/UP:   210/Vref40 + 70
    • 1 or 2:  190/ Vref40 + 50
    • 5:        170/ Vref40 + 30
    • 10:      160/ Vref40 + 30
    • 15:      150/Vref or Vref40 + 20
    • 25:      140/ Vref40 + 10
  12. If a flaps 15 landing is needed because of performance, what switch needs to be flipped?
    GROUND PROXIMITY flap inhibit switch to FLAP INHIBIT
  13. On a visual approach, remain at what altitude until further descent is required for landing?
    1500' AAE
  14. Can tower visibility or Pilot reported visibility (PIREP) be used to determine approach or landing minimums?
    No.
  15. How is the controlling approach visibility is prioritized?
    • 1) Runway Visual Range (RVR) is controlling for runways listed as RVR-controlled on Jeppesen charts.
    • 2) Runway Visibility Value (RVV) is given in miles and fractions of miles for a specified runway.
    • 3) Prevailing Visibility (PV) is “Airport Visibility” and is used for all runways unless a runway is controlled by RVR or RVV.
  16. What is the criteria for approaches with visibility at or above 1000/3?
    • Either Pilot may fly the approach and land.
    • Autopilot use is recommended but not required.
    • Flight directors, if available, will be used.
    • • With weather at or above 1,000/3, brief and fly the portion of the published instrument approach that provides course guidance to visual approach conditions.
  17. What is the criteria for ILS approaches down to ¾ Mile or 4000 RVR?
    • • Use the ILS Approach Profile procedures and a Jeppesen ILS approach chart.
    • Either Pilot may fly the approach and land.
    • Autopilot use is recommended but not required.
    • Flight directors, if available, will be used.
    • • On HGS-equipped aircraft, when minimums are CAT I or greater, the Captain may fly or monitor the approach on the HGS.
  18. HGS single-engine approaches can only be flown to what approach minimums?
    CAT I ILS minimums or to non-precision approach minimums.
  19. What is the criteria for ILS approaches below ¾ Mile or 4000 RVR down to ½ Mile or 1800 RVR?
    • • An autopilot-coupled ILS or a hand-flown HGS approach is required.
    • Both flight directors must be operative and used for the approach.
    • • The Captain must fly the approach and land if the HGS is required for the approach.
    • • If weather conditions are at or near CAT I minimums, and a CAT II or IIIA approach is available, consider briefing and flying a CAT II or CAT IIIA approach, as appropriate.
    • • Should a flight director, autopilot, or the HGS malfunction during the approach, the Flight Deck Crew must execute a missed approach unless the approach can be safely continued using an operational flight director, autopilot, or the HGS, or the runway environment is in sight and the aircraft is in a position that allows the safe continuation to a landing.

    NOTE: Approach light system including RAIL (if installed) must be available and operative. An inoperative sequenced flashing light (SFL) renders a RAIL inoperative.

    NOTE: CAT I minimums for runways served by ALSF I or ALSF II approach light systems are not affected by an inoperative SFL system.
  20. When shooting an HGS approach, what mode is recommended for CAT I weather conditions, particularly in gusty wind conditions?
    Either the PRI or IMC mode (to avoid illumination of the APCH WARN light)
  21. What approaches require the use of the HGS? When is AIII required?
    • SA CAT I
    • CAT II
    • CAT III

    AIII required for CAT II reduced vis, CAT II with 1000RVR mins and CAT III
  22. What approach lighting is required for CAT II/III approaches?
    • ALSF-I or ALSF-II approach lighting systems (sequence flashing lights [SFL] may be inoperative)
    • • High intensity runway lights (HIRL)
    • • Runway centerline lights (CL)
    • • Touchdown zone (TDZ) lights
  23. What are the standard mins for CAT II and CAT III approaches?
    CAT II: As low as 1200 RVR (two transmissometers) to DA 100 or 1600 RVR (one transmissometer)  to DA 150'. 1000 RVR (two transmissometers) in AIII mode.

    CAT III: As low as 600 RVR
  24. RVR values determine the minimums required to begin an instrument approach when the airport reaches what visibility?
    < 1/2 mi
  25. RNAV approach criteria for visibility below 1,000 ft ceiling OR 3 miles down to ¾ mile or 4000 RVR?
    • Either Pilot may fly the approach at the Captain’s discretion.
    • Autopilot use is recommended for approaches with RNP of 0.30 NM.
    • Both flight directors must be operative and used for the approach.

    L Autopilot use is required for approaches with an RNP less than 0.30 NM.
  26. RNAV approach criteria for visibility below ¾ mile or 4000 RVR down to ½ mile or 1800 RVR?
    • Either Pilot may fly the approach at the Captain’s discretion.
    • Autopilot use is recommended for approaches with RNP of 0.30 NM.
    • Both flight directors must be operative and used for the approach.
    • • 15 kt crosswind limit applies.


    L Autopilot use is required for approaches with an RNP less than 0.30 NM.
  27. Non-Precision Approach criteria with visibility below 1,000 ft ceiling or 3 mile visibility down to ¾ Mile or 4000 RVR?
    • Autopilot use is recommended but not required.
    • Flight directors, if available, will be used.
  28. Non-Precision Approach criteria with visibility below ¾ mile or 4000 RVR down to ½ mile or 1800 RVR?
    • Autopilot use is recommended but not required.
    • Flight directors, if available, must be used.
    • • Either pilot may fly the approach and land.
    • • Below ¾ mile or 4000 RVR, the 15 kt crosswind limit applies.
  29. An ILS CAT I approach is defined as an ILS approach that has what minimum visibility?
    2400 RVR or 1800 RVR, as published (and does not require the use of the HGS).
  30. When must the Captain make the landing?
    When an engine is shut down.

    On an approach that requires HGS.

    As required by new hire restrictions.
  31. Are there any visibility restrictions on who must fly an ILS approach?
    No. The ILS approach can be flown and landed by either Pilot down to and including non-HGS ILS minimums.
  32. When must the stabilized approach criteria be met for an ILS approach?
    1000 ft above TDZE
  33. If LNAV is used to intercept the localizer on an ILS approach, when must LNAV be disengaged?
    Prior to the final approach segment.
  34. On an ILS approac, do not descend below what altitude until established on the LOC course? How is “On the LOC course” defined?
    Do not descend below the GSIA or intercept the glideslope until established on the LOC course.

    “On the LOC course” is defined as less than two dots displacement while intercepting and then maintaining the localizer centerline.
  35. What are the standard calls for an ILS approach?
    • (PF) “VOR LOC Capture”
    • (PF) “Glideslope Capture”
    • (PF) Call the outer marker or named fix and crossing altitude
    • (PM) “Crosschecked”
    • (BOTH) Standard 1000' callout
    • (PM) “500”
    • (PM) “Approaching minimums”
    • (PF) “Going outside”
    • (PM) “Minimums”
    • (PF) “Landing” or "Go-around"
    • (PM) Standard calls <= 100' if required
  36. When is the HGS required on approach?
    • ILS approaches with visibility below ½ mile or
    • 1800 RVR (or to ½ and 1800 RVR if Special CAT I is published on the approach chart as “HGS AIII MODE ONLY”).
  37. What are the flaps and wind limitation for an HGS approach below CAT I minimums?
    • Flaps 30 or 40
    • Max headwind 25 kts in AIII mode
    • Max crosswind 15 kts
    • Max tailwind 10 kts (5 kts if the braking action is reported as POOR)
  38. On an HGS approach, when must the autopilot be disengaged?
    No later than the GSIA or glideslope intercept, whichever occurs last.
  39. On an HGS approach, when must the HGS guidance be used exclusively?
    On the FAS.
  40. When on an HGS AIII approach, when must the FO place his hands behind the thrust levers?
    500' above TDZE
  41. When on an HGS AIII approach, what should the FO call when if the APCH WARN or HGS FAIL light illuminates?
    Call, “Approach Warning, Go Around” or “HGS Fail, Go Around” and CA performs a go around.

    NOTE: The Approach Warning or HGS Fail is available only in the AIII mode and below 500 ft AGL.

    NOTE: If APCH WARN or HGS FAIL occurs prior to reaching minimums with the runway in sight, CA continue the approach by calling,“Landing.” “Runway in sight” means the actual runway is in sight, not just part of the runway environment, such as lead-in lights or other approach lights.
  42. On an HGS approach, at DA, when should CA execute a go-around/missed approach?
    • • Insufficient visual references available for landing.
    • • Aircraft is not in a position that will allow a landing in the desired touchdown zone.
    • • Bank angle greater than 8° (outside of HGS bank warning bracket limits).
    • • Aircraft will not land and/or remain within 30 ft of the runway centerline.
  43. What are the additional callouts for an HGS approach?
    • FO: “1,000 ft, ____ mode.” Identify the HCP
    • mode selected.
  44. What are the deviation callouts for HGS approaches using the AIII Mode?
    “Airspeed”   Target speed ± 5 kts down to flare initiation

    • “Crosstrack”   ±1 DOT (rectangle on the
    • expanded LOC) down to touchdown

    “Glideslope”   ± 1 DOT down to 100 ft

    “Sink Rate”   1,000 fpm down to 50 ft

    “Approach Warning, Go Around”

    “HGS Fail, Go Around”
  45. For an RNAV (RNP) and RNAV (GPS) Approach, what should be done if a single FD fails between the FAF and the MAP?
    Execute a go-around unless a safer course of action can be taken.
  46. When can an RNAV approach procedure waypoint be modified (from the IAF through the missed approach holding point) if it is necessary to comply with an ATC clearance?
    • • The modified waypoint is prior to the FAF.
    • • The aircraft is under radar surveillance, or will remain above the MSA or Terminal Arrival Area (TAA) floor until established on the approach.
    • • A course intercept is not to an RF leg, a fix beginning an RF leg, or the segment preceding the RF leg.
  47. On an RNAV approach, is the use of LP or LPV minima authorized?
    No.
  48. What is the RNP value for an RNAV (GPS) approach?
    0.30 NM (and is not listed in minima block)
  49. For RNAV (RNP) approaches, when should you enter the lateral RNP value on the LEGS page?
    Prior to the IAF.

    NOTE: Manually setting the RNP value overrides the automatic FMC sequencing of RNP values until deleted or the aircraft has landed.

    NOTE: Do not enter an RNP value for RNAV (GPS) approaches. The RNP values sequence automatically for the phase of flight.
  50. What approaches require the aircraft to be fully configured for the landing by 1000' above TDZE? By the FAF?
    ILS & RNAV

    Non-Precision Approach Using Vertical Speed
  51. What are the standard callouts for an RNAV approach?
    • (PF) "LNAV & VNAV path"
    • (PF) Call FAF and altitude
    • (PM) "Crosschecked"
    • (BOTH) Standard 1000', 500', Appr mins,Mins, and below 100' callouts.
  52. What are the additional deviation callouts for RNAV approaches?
    “Crosstrack”   XTK ERROR exceeds ½ RNP (NPS ½ scale deflection), or NPS pointer in the ANP bar.

    “Go Around”   Lateral ANP bar amber indication, or NPS pointer cannot be maintained at less than 1 x RNP (NPS full scale deflection)

    • “Go Around”    Vertical NPS pointer cannot
    • be maintained between the ANP bar limits.

    “Go Around”    UNABLE REQD NAV PERF-RNP/ FMC DISAGREE/ VERIFY POSITION or VERIFY POS: XXX-XXX
  53. When will a DDA be used? What is it?
    Non-precision approaches without vertical guidance.

    A DDA is determined by adding 50 ft to the authorized MDA.
  54. Which approaches satisfy the Non-Precision Approaches Without Vertical Guidance criteria?
    • • LOC
    • • LOC/DME
    • • LOC (BC)
    • • LDA
    • • LDA/DME
    • • VOR
    • • VOR/DME
  55. What is the restriction on the flight director when flying a LOC (BACK CRS) course approach?
    Do not use the flight director in VOR LOC or APP when flying a LOC (BACK CRS) course approach.
  56. What are the standard callouts for the Non-Precision Approaches Using Vertical Speed?
    (PF) “VOR LOC Capture”

    Standard approach callouts afterwards.
  57. For CAT III operations, what should be accomplished if any controlling RVR is reported below the lowest authorized minima?
    Go-around
  58. If an RNAV (RNP) approach was conducted, when should the manually entered RNP value be deleted?
    When it is no longer applicable. The manually entered RNP value is applicable until one of the following is accomplished:

    • • Reaching the published missed approach holding point.
    • • Upon executing alternate ATC missed approach instructions.
    • • Upon landing (RNP value is automatically deleted).
  59. What are the missed approach calls?
    • (PF) “Go Around”, “Flaps 15 (1)”
    • (PM) “Go Around”
    • (PF) “Landing Gear Up, Set Missed Approach
    • Altitude.”
    • (PM) “Positive Rate, Landing Gear Up.”

    • At 400' AGL:
    • (PF) Direct the appropriate roll mode.
    • (PM) CL:“NAV Selected” Select/verify the appropriate roll mode.

    • At 1,000 ft AAE
    • (PF) "Set Speed" ONLY if IAS/MACH window open (a/p engaged).
    • (PF) “Flaps ____”, “I Have the Thrust/Climb Thrust”, call to retract flaps on schedule.
    • (PM) “Flaps ____”, set thrust, retract flaps.
  60. What is the Stabilized Approach Criteria?
    • •By 1,000 ft above TDZE, the aircraft must be:
    • In the planned landing configuration (For approaches flown in Vertical Speed, the aircraft must be in the planned landing configuration by the FAS)
    • •Be in the VTARGET speed range(Vtgt + 10 and -5 kts).
    • •Be on appropriate glidepath with a normal descent rate.
  61. For approaches where maneuvering is required, the aircraft must be on and maintaining final approach course or runway centerline with wings essentially level by what altitude?
    500 Ft Above TDZE
  62. What are the standard required deviation callouts for all approaches?
    “Sink Rate” - sink rate exceeds 2,000 fpm btwn 2,000 ft - 1,000 ft above TDZE.

    Below 1000' above TDZE:

    • “Airspeed” - Vtgt - 5 kt/+10 kt or < Vref
    • “Sink Rate” - 1,000+ fpm
    • “Crosstrack" - ± 1 DOT CDI/± 5° VOR
    • “Glideslope” - ± 1 DOT
  63. How far out can a visual approach be granted?
    35 NM

    NOTE: A/C must have visual contact with the traffic to follow, the landmarks on the charted visual flight procedure, and/or the airport.
  64. When is it required to brief an instrument approach?
    • • The runway is not expected to be in sight by the FAF/GSIA.
    • Rain is reported or visible in the airport vicinity.
    • Significant weather is reported or apparent in the airport vicinity (e.g., thunderstorm, fog, blowing dust, snow).
    • Restricted visibility is reported or apparent in the airport vicinity (e.g., haze, mist, low sun angles).
  65. Once an instrument approach is started, it will be flown using instrument procedures. When can visual procedures then be used?
    If VMC are subsequently encountered and the runway is in sight by 1,000 ft above TDZE, at the Captain’s discretion.
  66. When are DDA's used?
    DDAs are used for the following non-circle-to-land approaches with MDA minima:

    • • Non-precision approaches based on ground-based navaids (e.g., LOC, VOR) using the Vertical Speed profile.
    • RNAV (GPS) approaches to LNAV-only MDA minima.
  67. When is LOOK SEE criteria applied? Is there a limitation?
    • Once established on the FAS, the PF may
    • continue the approach to mins even if the controlling vis (prevailing or RVR) is reported below the min req for the appr provided:

    • • The approach is started with weather at, or above, approach minimums.
    • • The aircraft is on the FAS.
    • • The visibility is subsequently reported below minimums.

    NOTE: Not applicable to CAT III approaches.
  68. How is an ILS FAS defined?
    The ILS FAS begins when the aircraft is established on localizer and glideslope at the published GSIA. When vectored at an altitude below the GSIA, the FAS begins when the aircraft is established on localizer and glideslope at the vector altitude.

    NOTE: When on the ILS FAS, an approach may be continued to the DA even if a controlling RVR is reported to be below minima.
  69. How is an RNAV or Non-Precision FAS defined?
    The RNAV or non-precision FAS begins at any of the following:

    • • At the depicted FAF.
    • • At a point where the procedure turn intercepts the final approach course inbound, if the FAF is not depicted.
  70. When can you continue an approach below DA, DDA, or MDA?
    • • (All Approaches) The aircraft can use normal ROD using normal maneuvers, and touchdown will occur within the touchdown zone.
    • • Do not descend until the VDP, if published, except where a descent to the runway cannot be made using normal procedures/ROD.
    • • (CAT III) Controlling RVR at or above minimums.
    • • (CAT I) Need req flt vis. Flt vis is
    • the fow vis from the flt deck as assessed by the Crew at DA, DDA, or MDA.
    • • At least one of the following sufficient visual references:
    •   • ALS (to 100 ft above TDZE) unless see red terminating bars or the red side row bars.
    •   • Threshold, Threshold markings or lights
    •   • REILs, VASI
    •   • Touchdown zone,TD markings, TD lights
    •   • Rwy,rwy markings, rwy lights (CAT I only)
  71. On a PRM approach, how should a Breakout call be flown?
    • • Must be initiated immediately and hand-flown (flight directors selected OFF).
    • • These instructions could include a descending turn.

    NOTE: During a descending breakout, descending at a rate greater than 1,000 ft per minute is not required, and in no case will thedescent be below the minimum vectoring altitude (MVA).
  72. On a PRM approach, how should a TCAS RA be handled with or without a corresponding breakout call?
    • ATC command to turn with TCAS RA: the Flight Deck Crew must follow both the final monitor controller’s turn command and the TCAS RA’s climb or descent command.

    • TCAS RA alone: the Pilot should follow the RA and advise the controller of the action taken ASAP.
  73. What flight path should be flown on missed approach from a circle-to-land approach?
    The missed approach procedure specified for the applicable instrument approach must be followed unless an alternate missed approach procedure is specified by ATC.

    • To become established on the prescribed missed approach course make an initial climbing turn toward the landing runway and continue the turn until established on
    • the missed approach course.
  74. When may a sidestep maneuver be performed and started below 1,000 ft above TDZE?
    • • Sidestep minimums are published, and the actual weather is at or above the sidestep minimums.
    • • Sidestep minimums are not published, but the actual weather is at or above the basic circle-to-land minimums of 1,000/3.
  75. On an RNAV approach, what RNP value requires the use of the autopilot?
    Autopilot use is required for approaches with an RNP less than 0.30 NM.

    NOTE: Autopilot use is recommended for approaches with an RNP of 0.30 NM.

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