QRH Non-Norm

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Author:
spqswa
ID:
254135
Filename:
QRH Non-Norm
Updated:
2013-12-22 20:29:20
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SWA
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Description:
QRH Non-Normal Maneuvers
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  1. How will you know about a PWS Caution and what is the crew response?
    A PWS caution displays the windshear icon on the navigation display (CL: radar screen) and sounds an aural “Monitor Radar Display” alert when windshear is detected in the caution region.

    • Crew response to a PWS caution:
    • • On takeoff—continue the takeoff, and use the precautionary takeoff profile. Be prepared to execute the windshear recovery procedure.
    • • On approach—initiate a normal go-around. Be prepared to execute the windshear recovery procedure.

    NOTE: (CL Only) A PWS advisory displays only the windshear icon on the radar screen. No lights annunciate, and no aural alerts sound. Continue the approach or takeoff and monitor.
  2. How will you know about a PWS Warning and what is the crew response?
    A PWS warning displays the windshear icon on the navigation display and sounds the aural alert, “WINDSHEAR AHEAD, WINDSHEAR AHEAD,” on takeoff or, “GO AROUND, WINDSHEAR AHEAD, WINDSHEAR AHEAD,” on approach.

    • Crew response to a PWS warning:
    • • On takeoff: Before starting the takeoff roll, delay the takeoff. After starting the takeoff roll, abort the takeoff if it can be done safely, or continue the
    • takeoff using the precautionary takeoff profile. Be prepared to execute a windshear
    • recovery.
    • • On approach—initiate a normal go-around. Be prepared to execute a windshear recovery.
  3. What are indications of windshear encounters?
    • • Red WINDSHEAR warning light; two-tone siren followed by the aural alert, “WINDSHEAR, WINDSHEAR, WINDSHEAR.”
    • • Inadvertent windshear encounter or other situation resulting in unacceptable flightpath deviations. An unacceptable flightpath deviation is any uncontrolled change from normal, steady state flight conditions during a takeoff or an approach in excess of the
    • following:
    • ± 15 kt indicated airspeed
    • • ± 500 fpm vertical speed
    • ± 5° pitch attitude
    • ± 1 dot displacement from the glideslope
    • Unusual thrust lever position for a significant period of time
  4. What is the Windshear recovery procedure?
    • PF:
    • • Disengage autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Press either TO/GA switch.
    • • Aggressively apply emergency thrust.
    • • Simultaneously roll wings level and rotate to an initial pitch of 15°.
    • • Retract speedbrakes (if extended).
    • • Follow flight director guidance.
    • • If terrain contact is still a threat, continue rotation up to pitch limit indicator or respect the stick-shaker or initial buffet.
    • • When windshear is no longer a factor:
    • - Gear and flap configuration may be changed.
    • - Slowly decrease pitch attitude and accelerate.

    • PM:
    • • Ensure emergency thrust.
    • • Ensure recovery controls are applied.
    • • Monitor vertical speed and altitude,
    • • Call out any trend toward terrain contact.
    • • Call out significant airspeed changes.
  5. What are the GPWS terrain/obstacle warnings?
    • “Pull Up”
    • “Terrain, Terrain Pull Up”
    • “Obstacle, Obstacle Pull Up”
  6. What is the Terrain Avoidance Manuever?
    • PF:
    • • Disengage autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Aggressively apply emergency thrust.
    • • Simultaneously roll wings level and rotate to an initial pitch of 20°.
    • • Retract speedbrakes (if extended).
    • • If terrain contact is still a threat, continue rotation up to pitch limit indicator if installed or respect the stick-shaker or initial buffet.
    • • When terrain contact is no longer a factor (monitor radio altimeter and/or EGPWS display for sustained or increasing terrain separation):
    • - Gear and flap configuration may be changed.
    • - Slowly decrease pitch attitude and accelerate.

    • PM:
    • • Ensure emergency thrust.
    • • Ensure recovery controls are applied.
    • • Monitor vertical speed and altitude.
    • • Call out any trend toward terrain contact.
    • • Call out significant airspeed changes.

    NOTE: Do not use flight director commands.
  7. What are the GPWS terrain/obstacle cautions?
    • “Terrain”
    • “Too Low Terrain”
    • “Caution Terrain”
    • “Caution Obstacle”
  8. What is the crew response to the GPWS terrain/obstacle cautions?
    • • Correct the flight path.
    • • Be prepared to accomplish the Terrain Avoidance Maneuver.
    • • If on approach, initiate a go-around for any of the following:
    • - Night
    • - IMC
    • - Unable to acquire terrain visually
  9. What are the "Additional GPWS cautions" and what is the crew response?
    • “Don’t Sink”
    • “Sink Rate”
    • “Too Low Gear”
    • “Too Low Flaps”
    • “Glideslope”
    • “Bank Angle”
    • “Airspeed Low” (as installed)

    Crew response: Correct the flight path, aircraft configuration, or airspeed.
  10. By definition, under what conditions should an upset recovery be performed?
    • An upset can generally be defined as unintentionally exceeding the following conditions:
    • • Pitch attitude greater than 25° nose up
    • • Pitch attitude greater than 10° nose down
    • Bank angle greater than 45°
    • • Within above parameters but flying at airspeeds inappropriate for the conditions
  11. How can a stalled condition be recognized?
    • Continuous stick shaker activation accompanied by one or more of the following:
    • • Buffeting, which could be heavy at times
    • • Lack of pitch authority and/or roll control
    • • Inability to arrest descent rate

    If the aircraft is stalled, recovery from the stall must be accomplished first by applying and maintaining nose down elevator until stall recovery is complete and stick shaker activation ceases.
  12. Nose High Recovery?
    • PF:
    • • Recognize and confirm the situation.
    • • Disengage autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Apply as much as full nose down elevator.
    • • Apply appropriate nose down stabilizer trim. 
    • • Reduce thrust.
    • • Roll (adjust bank angle) to obtain a nose down pitch rate.
    • • Complete the recovery:
    • - When approaching the horizon, roll to wings level.
    • - Check airspeed and adjust thrust.
    • - Establish pitch attitude for desired flight conditions.

    • PM:
    • • Recognize and confirm the situation.
    • • Call out attitude, airspeed, and altitude throughout the recovery.
    • • Verify that all required actions have been completed and call out any omissions.
  13. Nose Low Recovery
    • PF:
    • • Recognize and confirm the situation.
    • • Disengage autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Recover from stall, if required.
    • • Roll in shortest direction to wings level (unload and roll if bank angle is more than 90°). 
    • • Recover to level flight:
    • - Apply nose up elevator.
    • - Apply nose up trim, if required.
    • - Adjust thrust and drag as required

    • PM:
    • • Recognize and confirm the situation.
    • • Call out attitude, airspeed, and altitude throughout the recovery.
    • • Verify that all required actions have been completed and call out any omissions.
  14. Stall Recovery procedure?
    NOTE: Do not use flight director commands during the recovery.

    • PF:
    • • Hold the control column firmly.
    • • Disengage autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Smoothly apply nose down elevator to reduce the angle of attack until buffet or stick shaker stops. Nose down stabilizer trim may be needed.
    • • Roll wings level.
    • • Advance thrust levers, as needed (up to and including emergency thrust, if required).
    • • Retract speedbrakes (if extended).
    • • Do not change flaps or landing gear configuration, except during liftoff, if flaps are up, call for flaps 1.
    • • Return to the desired flight path.
    • • Reengage autopilot and autothrottle, if desired.

    • PM:
    • • Monitor altitude and airspeed.
    • • Ensure recovery controls are applied.
    • • Call out any trend toward terrain contact.
    • • Set the flap lever as directed.
  15. Rejected Takeoff (RTO) procedures.
    • CA:
    • Simultaneously perform the following:
    • • Close the thrust levers.
    • • Disengage the autothrottles.
    • • Apply maximum manual wheel brakes or verify operation of the RTO autobrake system.*

    • Without delay:
    • • Raise the speedbrake lever.
    • • Apply reverse thrust up to the maximum amount consistent with conditions.
    • • Continue maximum braking until certain the airplane will stop on the runway.

    * - If RTO autobrake is selected, monitor system performance and apply manual wheel brakes if the AUTO BRAKE DISARM light illuminates or deceleration is not adequate.

    • • Using the PA, the Captain will advise the Flight Attendants/Passengers to “Remain Seated.”
    • • If necessary, an all exit evacuation is ordered by stating, “Evacuate, Evacuate, Evacuate.” In some situations, it

    • FO:
    • Verify action as follows:
    • • TLs closed, A/T disengaged, Max brakes
    • • SB up, and call “Extended” or  “No Speedbrake.”
    • • Both green REV lts illum, call “Deployed” or “No Reverse.” 
    • If the AUTO BRAKE DISARM light illuminates:
    • • Call “Autobrake Disarm.”
    • • Call out any omitted action items. 
    • • Call “60 knots.”
    • • Communicate the reject decision to the
    • control tower.

    NOTE: A Captain should reject a takeoff above 80 Knots only for the following reasons: an engine failure, fire or fire warning, predictive windshear warning, or the aircraft is unsafe/unable to fly.

    NOTE: A takeoff shall not be started or continued with any warning horn or bell sounding before the aircraft attains 80 knots.

    • NOTE: After V1, rejecting the takeoff is not recommended unless the Captain judges the airplane
    • incapable of flight.

    NOTE: The Captain must submit an Irregularity Report if a takeoff is rejected. If an erroneous takeoff warning horn actuates on takeoff or during the takeoff warning check, the Captain must ensure that an Info Only entry is made in the aircraft logbook.
  16. Driftdown procedures.
    • PF:
    • • Disconnect autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Manually set continuous thrust.
    • • Set engine out MAX ALT in the MCP (from L or R ENG OUT on the FMC CRZ page)
    • • Select LVL CHG.
    • • Set ENG OUT SPD in the MCP.
    • • Initiate turn (if required).
    • • At single engine altitude, maintain continuous thrust.

    • PM:
    • • Select CON thrust in the FMC.
    • • Select L or R ENG OUT on the FMC
    • CRZ page.
    • • Notify ATC.

    • CA:
    • • Turn the landing lights ON.
    • • As conditions and workload permit, call for or announce the appropriate QRH checklist.
  17. Engine Failure During Takeoff Profile
    • At Positive Rate of Climb:
    • • Landing gear up.
    • • Climb at V2 minimum or present speed, whichever is
    • higher (max V2 + 20 kt).

    • At 400 ft AGL:
    • • Select/verify the appropriate roll mode.
    • • Verify route tracking.


    • At Minimum Cleanup Altitude:
    • • Set speed to flaps up maneuvering speed.
    • • Retract flaps on schedule.
    • • At flaps up maneuvering speed:
    • - Select LVL CHG or other appropriate pitch mode.
    • - Set CON thrust.
    • • Climb out at flaps up maneuvering speed.
    • • Accomplish the QRH checklist.

    NOTE: It may be necessary to perform immediate action items prior to reaching minimum cleanup altitude.

    • NOTE:  Certain runways have special engine-out turn procedures. Advise ATC when actually performing an engine-out procedure that differs from the ATC clearance. These procedures may require a turn prior to 400 ft. At airports with engine-out turn procedures, the procedure will be briefed and the initial turn
    • flown regardless of meteorological conditions.
  18. One Engine Go-Around Configuration Profile
    • Initiation:
    • • Simultaneously:
    • - Select TO/GA.
    • - Set go-around thrust.
    • - Select flaps 1.
    • - Smoothly rotate toward 13° pitch attitude, then FD
    • • At positive rate of climb, retract landing gear.
    • Set missed approach altitude.

    • At 400 ft AGL
    • • Select/verify appropriate roll mode.
    • • Verify route tracking.


    • 1,000 ft AAE
    • • Set speed to flaps up maneuvering speed.
    • Retract flaps on schedule.
    • • At flaps up maneuvering speed:
    • - Select LVL CHG or other appropriate pitch mode.
    • - Set CON thrust.
    • • Engage the autopilot, as needed.
  19. What does TA ONLY mean and when should it be selected?
    By selecting TA ONLY, the Flight Deck Crew effectively takes responsibility for ensuring safe separation and is required to operate at a heightened state of traffic awareness.


    • The TA ONLY mode should be selected under the following circumstances:
    • • During single-engine operations.
    • • During visual approaches to closely spaced parallel runways if annotated on the respective airport’s 10-7 page. The 10-7 page provides guidance as to when TA ONLY is selected.
  20. What is the crew response if an RA is received while in cruise at the aircraft maximum operating altitude?
    Flight Deck Crew is expected to follow the RA guidance and then return to the cruise altitude when the RA is resolved.
  21. What is a “Monitor” or “Maintain” RA and what is the crew response?
    • This includes the following alerts:
    • • “Monitor Vertical Speed”
    • • “Maintain Vertical Speed, Maintain”
    • • “Maintain Vertical Speed, Crossing Maintain”

    • PF:
    • • Maneuver as needed to satisfy the RA.
    • • The autopilot may remain engaged.
    • • The autothrottle may remain engaged.
    • • Follow the planned lateral flight path unless contact with the conflicting traffic requires other action.

    • PM:
    • • Advise ATC of TCAS deviation as soon as possible.
  22. What it the response to an RA other than a “Monitor or “Maintain” RA. (Except a Climb RA in landing Configuration)?
    • PF:
    • If maneuvering is required:
    • • Disengage the autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage the autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Smoothly adjust pitch and thrust to satisfy RA
    • command.
    • • Follow the planned lateral flight path unless
    • contact with the conflicting traffic requires other
    • action.
    • • Adjust response for any increase, reversal, or
    • downgrade of TCAS guidance.
    • • Return to previous clearance as soon as “Clear of
    • conflict” is heard and traffic conflict is resolved.

    • PM:
    • • Advise ATC of TCAS deviation as soon as possible.
  23. What is the crew response to a Climb RA in Landing Configuration?
    • PF:
    • • Disengage the autopilot (if engaged).
    • • Disengage the autothrottle (if engaged).
    • • Apply go-around thrust.
    • • Call for “Flaps 15.”
    • • Smoothly adjust pitch to satisfy RA command.
    • • Follow the planned lateral flight path unless
    • contact with the conflicting traffic requires other action.
    • • Verify a positive rate of climb and call, “Landing Gear Up.”

    • PM:
    • • Verify that go-around thrust is set.
    • • Repeat the PF’s flap callout, and select Flaps 15.
    • • Verify a positive rate of climb on the altimeter, and call, “Positive Rate, Landing Gear Up.”
    • • Advise ATC of TCAS deviation as soon as possible.

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