Jazz Final Cards pt 1

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Author:
ndumas2
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25684
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Jazz Final Cards pt 1
Updated:
2010-07-04 18:13:12
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Jazz Final
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Part one Know something about each of these jazz musicians
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  1. Cootie Williams
    • Plays Trumpet
    • Featured in:
    • New East St. Louis
    • Toodle O

    • (2)
    • Concerto for Cootie-
    • Duke Ellington and Orchestra; used plunger mute to:
    • Color sound
    • Growl effect
    • In Mellow Tone
  2. Scott Lafarro
    Bassist

    • revolutionized the technical approach to the double
    • bass
  3. Jaco Pastorious
    • Bass player
    • (electric) with Weather Report

    • Changed the
    • direction of jazz bass playing

    • Imitated
    • just as the great jazz bassists.

    • Outstanding
    • in four different roles

    • Walking
    • Bass

    • Interactive
    • approach (ala Scott LaFarro)

    • Funk Bass\
    • Soloist
  4. Chet Baker
    • With Gerry
    • Mulligan

    • Pianoless
    • quartet - Trumpet, bari sax, bass, drums.

    • Main focus
    • was on counterpoint, with no harmonic instrument present.

    • Bernie's
    • Tune

    • Walkin
    • Shoes
  5. Django
    Rheinhart
    • Guitar
    • (1910-1953)

    • Belgian
    • gypsy guitarist

    • 1928 - Lost
    • 2 fingers in a fire. Compensated with a new technique.

    • Used an
    • un-amplified guitar- unlike Charlie Christian.

    • Most famous
    • group was Quintette du Hot Club De France with violinst Stephane Grappelli

    • First
    • outstanding European Jazz Musician

    Dinah

    Shine
  6. Paul
    Chambers
    • Miles
    • Davis’ sideman during hard bop period
  7. Art
    Blakey
    Drummer

    • Leader of
    • the Jazz Messengers- important hard bop band

    • Epitomized
    • the loosening of jazz drumming styles.

    • Used loud
    • intrusions as accompanimental figures.

    • Moanin -
    • 1958

    • Blues March
    • - 1958

    • Dat Dere -
    • 1960
  8. Art Tatum
    Piano

    • Severely
    • limited vision - completely blind in one eye, limited vision in the other

    • Amazing
    • Technique & velocity at piano

    • Well known
    • for Reharmonization - Keeping the original melody -
    • substituting different chords

    • Willow
    • Weep for Me

    • Too
    • Marvelous for Words
  9. John

    Coltrane
    • In Miles
    • Davis’ all star band on Kind of Blue

    • Tenor &
    • Soprano Sax

    • After
    • Charlie Parker, the most widely imitated saxophonist in Jazz.

    • Came to
    • fame in 1955 with the Miles Davis quintet

    • Addiction
    • to drugs/alcohol disrupted his career.

    • Overcame
    • the addictions.

    • A Love
    • Supreme celebrates this victory and the
    • religious experience associated with it

    • Turned to
    • radical musical styles in the mid 1960s. Attracted large audiences

    • After his
    • death, he acquired a cult-like following. Church in San Francisco bears his
    • name

    • Coltrane's
    • Music

    • One of his
    • main objectives was to elaborate the full implications of bop chord
    • progressions.

    • Improvised
    • from formulae

    • Pattern
    • oriented, rigid eighth note repetitions

    • Impressive
    • technique yielded sheets of sound.

    • Entrenched
    • in the Thesaurus of Musical Scales by Nicholas Slonimsky.

    • Coltrane's
    • Influence

    • Enormous
    • impact on contemporaries and future players.

    • Re-established
    • the soprano saxophone as a modern jazz instrument.

    • He sold
    • hundreds of thousands of albums in his final years, & established
    • Avant-Garde jazz as popular music. (Temporary)
  10. Clifford

    Brown
    • Worked with
    • Sonny Rollins (Sax) and Max Roach (Drums)

    • Long fluid
    • lines, reminiscent of bebop.

    • Died in
    • auto accident at age 25.

    Cherokee

    Easy Living

    • Clifford
    • and Sonny Rollins

    Pent-up House

    • Listen for
    • the melodic development in Sonny's playing

    • Listen for
    • the long lines in Clifford's playing.
  11. Sonny

    Rollins
    Saxophone

    • Worked with
    • Clifford Brown
  12. Dave

    Brubeck
    Piano

    • Achieved
    • international fame.

    • Admired as
    • a composer, not as a pianist.

    • Worked with
    • Paul Desmond (Alto Sax) who had a very light, airy, sweet sound.

    • Had a
    • mastery of "odd" meters.

    • Blue
    • Rondo a la Turk

    • Take
    • Five
  13. Herbie

    Hancock
    Piano

    Headhunters

    Chameleon

    • Wanted to
    • hire not jazz musicians who could play funk but to hire funk musicians who
    • could play jazz.

    • Very
    • electronic, lots of studio production and overdubs.

    • Platinum
    • selling album.

    • My mind wandered to an old dream I had to be on one of Sly
    • Stone’s records. It was actually a
    • secret desire of mine for years—I wanted to know how he got that funky
    • sound. Then a completely new thought
    • entered my mind: Why not Sly Stone on one of my records? My immediate response
    • was “Oh, no, I can’t do that!” So I
    • asked myself why not. The answer came to
    • me: pure jazz snobbism.
  14. Miles

    Davis
    • Birth of
    • the Cool (1949-1950)

    • Done in
    • collaboration with arranger Gil Evans

    • Nine piece
    • band – Nonet

    • Instrumentation
    • was unusual, it added french horn and tuba.

    • Once
    • again, the arrangement was central to the music.

    Boplicity

    • Summertime
    • - Listen for Miles' muted trumpet sound.

    • Important
    • hard bob band

    • Influential
    • on Four Decades of Jazz

    • West Coast
    • (w/ Gil Evans)

    • Hard
    • Bop/Modal (Kind of Blue)

    • Post Bop
    • (1963-68)

    • Jazz
    • Rock/Fusion (Bitches Brew)

    • Trumpeter,
    • composer, and bandleader.

    • Unmistakable
    • sound. (Harmon Mute)

    • Great use
    • of space.
  15. During the Hard Bop period. Miles Davis Used the following sidemen
    • (1)
    • Paul Chambers

    • (2)
    • Wynton Kelly

    • (3)
    • Jimmy Cobb

    • (4)
    • John Coltrane

    • (5)
    • Albums included Kind
    • of Blue, Live at the Blackhawk, & Milestones.
  16. Talk about Miles' Kind of Blue
    • (1)
    • Recorded in 1959.

    • (2)
    • Most important and
    • pivotal album in modern jazz.

    • (3)
    • Featured an all-star
    • band:

    • (a)
    • Miles Davis

    • (b)
    • John Coltrane

    • (c)
    • Bill Evans

    • (d)
    • Cannonball Adderly

    • (e)
    • Jimmy Cobb

    • (f)
    • Paul Chambers

    • (4)
    • Significance

    • (a)
    • A set of inspired improvisations
    • by an all-star band

    • (b)
    • A significant departure
    • from traditional bop-derived styles.

    • (c)
    • Introduced the format of
    • Modal Jazz

    • (i)
    • Affected the Harmonic
    • Rhythm

    • (ii)
    • Harmonies of a single
    • chord or scale remain in effect for several measures.

    • (5)
    • Selections

    • (a)
    • So What

    • (b)
    • Freddie Freeloader

    • (c)
    • Blue in Green

    • (d)
    • Flamenco Sketches

    • (e)
    • All Blues
  17. Miles band in 1963-1968 This band included a famous rhythm section
    • (1)
    • Miles

    • (2)
    • Wayne Shorter
    • (Saxophone)

    • (3)
    • Herbie Hancock (Piano)

    • (4)
    • Tony Williams (Drums)

    • (5)
    • Ron Carter (Bass)

    • (6)
    • This band created a new
    • jazz idiom.

    • (7)
    • Every album used new
    • concepts.

    • (8)
    • They used tunes which
    • did not have bridges, turnarounds, or sections.

    • (9)
    • Used these forms to
    • encourage free-flowing sounds and improvisations.

    • (10)
    • The music Caused an
    • "airy" feeling.

    • (11)
    • Albums included -
    • Nefertitti, Filles de Kilimanjaro, & Miles Smiles

    • (12)
    • Experimental, rock
    • influenced recordings from 1963-1968. Headed in the direction of
    • "Fusion"
  18. Thelonious

    Monk
    • An
    • unorthodox composer, his work seriously challenged improvisers.

    • Able to
    • sound as if he "Bends" notes.

    • His music
    • transcends a stylistic category.

    • Melodic,
    • germ development.

    • Had well
    • focused compositions with a minimum amount of material. Each of his pieces has
    • different qualities.

    • Used rhythm
    • extensively.

    • Straight,
    • No Chaser

    Epistrophy
  19. Charlie

    Christian
    • Guitar-
    • used amplified guitar

    • Rose Room with Benny
    • Goodman sextet

    • Breafast Feud with BG
    • sextet
  20. Billy

    Strayhorn
    • Ellington’s
    • “alter ego”

    • Co-wrote
    • much of the music during this period

    • Liked to
    • compose is “dark” keys

    • Wrote Take
    • the A Train, Lush Life (age 18), and collaborated on the suites

    • Flourished
    • in Ellington’s shadow

    • It was
    • difficult to discern where one's style ended and the other's began.

    • Ellington/Strayhorn
    • Listening

    • Danse of
    • the Floreadors (Nutcracker)

    • Sugar Rum
    • Cherry (Nutcracker)

    • Such Sweet
    • Thunder (1957) (Shakespeare themes)

    • Sonnet in
    • Search of A Moor (Shakespeare themes

    • Up and
    • Down (Shakespeare themes)

    • Star
    • Crossed Lovers (Shakespeare themes)

    • Come
    • Sunday – (from Black Brown and Beige)
  21. Benny

    Goodman
    Swing

    • As a
    • soloist, he defined jazz clarinet as no other, before or since.

    • As a
    • bandleader, he established standards of technical perfection unheard of in that
    • era.

    • Autocratic
    • approach to band leading. (The Ray!!)

    • Popularized
    • swing, he became a pop icon.
  22. Benny

    Goodman History
    • Born
    • Chicago, 1909, 9th of 12 children

    • Eastern
    • European Jewish immigrant parents. Grew up in a ghetto.

    • At the age
    • of 14 he meets and play with Bix Beiderbecke.

    • Had
    • extensive classical training.
  23. Benny

    Goodman Quartet
    • Began in
    • 1935 as a trio.

    • First
    • racially mixed band.

    • Nationwide
    • tour met with negative reaction, until they got to the Palomar ballroom in LA.

    • Due to
    • prior radio broadcasts.

    • Important
    • concert - Carnegie Hall - 1938
  24. Duke

    Ellington
    • Ellington
    • in the 1950s

    • Continuation
    • of excellence in composition and sidemen.

    • Expansion
    • of forms, and compositions.

    • Formed a
    • collaboration with Billy Strayhorn. Strayhorn became his "Alter Ego"

    • More
    • sacred concerts.

    • Suites -
    • Such Sweet Thunder, Nutcracker, Black Brown and Beige

    • Ellington
    • Listening

    • Such Sweet
    • Thunder - based on the ideas and characters from Shakespeare.

    • Come
    • Sunday - Black Brown and Beige) with Mahalia Jackson - Gospel singer.

    • Sugar Rum
    • Cherry - From Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite. Features the bari sax.

    • Danse of
    • the Floreadors - changes the meter from a waltz to a swing tune.

    • Diminuendo
    • and Crescendo in Blue
    • Duke
    • Ellington at Newport

    • Diminuendo
    • & Crescendo in Blue
    • PaulbGonsalves plays the blues (27 choruses)
    • Has the same energy one would find at a contemporary rock concert.
  25. Count

    Basie
    Piano

    Swing

    • his early
    • playing has much stride in it. It begins to drop out in the 1930s and is gone
    • by the l950s. (just plink, plink)

    • Kansas City
    • Swing Style

    • Emphasized
    • swing as the main component. First great rhythm section came out of this band:
  26. Gil Evans
    Arranger

    • Birth of the Cool with
    • Miles Davis

    • West Coast
    • style with Davis

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