Pharmacology - Anti-Parasites 3

Card Set Information

Author:
kyleannkelsey
ID:
259613
Filename:
Pharmacology - Anti-Parasites 3
Updated:
2014-02-01 14:17:31
Tags:
Pharmacology Anti Parasites
Folders:
Pharmacology - Anti-Parasites 3
Description:
Pharmacology - Anti-Parasites 3
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user kyleannkelsey on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. What non-anti-parasitic action does eflornitine have?
    Facial hair treatment topically
  2. What type of neuropathy is most common with Nifurtimox?
    Memory loss
  3. What is the spectrum for Trimethoprim-sulfamethazole?
    Pneumocystis pneumonia (fungal)(primary), toxoplasmosis and some bacterial infections
  4. What is the MOA for Trimethoprim-sulfamethazole?
    Inhibits both dihydrofolate reductase (trimethoprim) and dihydropteroate synthetase (sulfamethazole) and in the end causing folic acid inhibition
  5. What is the spectrum for Pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine?
    Toxoplasmsis and Pneumocystis pneumonia (non-malaria resistant strains)
  6. What is the MOA for Pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine?
    Inhibits folic acid synthesis, Inhibits both dihydrofolate reductase (Pyrimethamine) and dihydropteroate synthetase (Sulfadiazine)
  7. What are the side effects for Pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine?
    Bone marrow suppression, GI mucosa impairment, hypersensitivity, potential teratogen
  8. Why does Pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine cause bone marrow suppression?
    It Prevents rapidly diving cells from growing
  9. In what patient population should Pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine be avoided?
    Folic acid deficient
  10. Why is Pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine potentially a teratogen?
    Because it can cause folic acid deficiency in the fetus ( mostly important during 1st trimester)
  11. What is the spectrum for Dapsone?
    Leprosy, pneumocystis pneumonia and toxoplasmosis
  12. How is Dapsone administered?
    Oral in combo w/ Pyrimethamine or Trimethoprim
  13. What is the MOA for Dapsone?
    Sulfonamie inhibiting dihydropteroate synthase
  14. What are the side effects for Dapsone?
    Hemolytic anemia and GI
  15. What patient population is at the greatest risk for Hemolytic anemia with Dapsone use?
    G6PD deficient
  16. Can Dapsone potentially cause a folic acid deficiency?
    Yes
  17. What is the spectrum for Atovaquone?
    Pneumocystis pneumonia, Malaria and toxoplasmosis
  18. How is Atovaquone administered?
    Oral
  19. What is the MOA for Atovaquone?
    DNA synthesis inhibitor: Interferes with mitochondrial electron transport thus inhibiting ATP and pyrimidine biosynthesis
  20. What are the side effects for Atovaquone?
    GI, rash and liver
  21. What does Atovaquone need to be administered in combo with to treat malaria?
    Proguanil
  22. What does Atovaquone need to be administered with to treat toxoplsmosis?
    Pyrimethamine
  23. What is the spectrum for Primaquine?
    Malaria, pneumocystis pneumonia
  24. What must primaquine be administered with to treat pneumocystis pneumonia?
    Clindamycin
  25. How is Primaquine administered?
    Oral
  26. What is the MOA for Primaquine?
    Oxidizes the cell membrane and makes it more permeable
  27. What are the anti-helminthic drugs?
    Benzimidazoles, Pyrantel, praziquantel, ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine
  28. What are the clinically relevant Nematodes (roundworms)?
    Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) and Strongyloides stercolaris (hookworm)
  29. What are the clinically relvenat Trematodes (Flukes/Hookworms)?
    Schistosoma species
  30. Where does Strongyloides stercolaris (Hookworm) come from?
    The ground
  31. What are the clinically relevant cestodes (Tapeworms)?
    Taenia species
  32. What patient population is most likely to get Pinworms (a nematode)?
    Children that don’t wash their hands
  33. Where do trematode infections come from?
    Snails that excrete it into the water
  34. Why do we have low tapeworm infection rates in the US?
    Good cooking habits and controlled ports
  35. What meds are included in the group, benzimidazoles?
    Albendazole and mebendazole
  36. What is the spectrum for benzimidazoles?
    Nematodes and cestode (Trichuris, Enterobius, Ascaris, Strongyloides, Toxocara, Taenia
  37. How is benzimidazoles administered?
    Orally
  38. What is the MOA for benzimidazoles?
    Inhibit microtubular polymerization and glucose uptake
  39. Does Albendazole have systemic or luminal activity?
    Both
  40. Does Mebendazole have systemic or luminal activity?
    Luminal
  41. How can you increased the oral bioavailability of albendazole?
    Take with a fatty meal
  42. Why is Albendazole used more than mebendazole?
    It has a wider spectrum
  43. Is Albendazole or mebendazole a prodrug?
    Both are prodrugs
  44. What are the side effects for benzimidazoles?
    Well tolerated, GI, liver, HA, Thrombocytopenia, teratogenic (1st tri)
  45. What is the spectrum for Pyrantel?
    Nematodes, Luminal Helminths, roundworm, pinworm and hookworm
  46. Is Pyrantel OTC or prescription?
    OTC
  47. How is Pyrantel administered?
    Orally
  48. What is the MOA for Pyrantel?
    Releases Ach, inhibits AChase, stimulates ganglionic neurons and block neuromuscular action: causes muscular release of Helminths from GI
  49. What are the side effects for Pyrantel?
    Well tolerated, GI, rare optic neurosis and CNS effects
  50. Why does it often take awhile for Pyrantal to wipe out a helminth infection?
    Because it does not effect eggs
  51. What is the spectrum for Praziquantel?
    Trematodes (flukes) and Cestodes (tapeworms)
  52. How is Praziquantel administered?
    Orally, well absorbed
  53. What is the MOA for Praziquantel?
    Increaes membrane permeability causing Ca influx, excessive muscle contraction, death and release of parasite and damages tegument of parasite
  54. What are the side effects for Praziquantel?
    GI distress, hepatic damage, myalgia, CNS toxicity (seizures, mental state)

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview