LANGUAGE ARTS 5

Card Set Information

Author:
shockwave
ID:
259695
Filename:
LANGUAGE ARTS 5
Updated:
2014-06-02 22:36:05
Tags:
LANGUAGE ARTS
Folders:
LANGUAGE ARTS 5
Description:
LANGUAGE ARTS 5
Show Answers:

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview

The flashcards below were created by user shockwave on FreezingBlue Flashcards. What would you like to do?


  1. HOW TO USE BAD AND BADLY.
    • Bad is an adjective.
    • Badly is an adverb. 
    • Since the sensory verbs like feel, smell, taste, and sound are followed by predicate adjectives, it is correct to say feel bad, smell bad, taste bad, and sound bad.

    • EX: I smell bad after my workout. (sensory verb)
    • I felt bad about missing my doctor's appointment. (sensory verb)
    • Did the orchestra sound bad with so many people absent? (sensory verb)

    • My nephew throws the ball badly. (Action verb requires an adverb.)
    • The actor performed badly and received a poor review. (Action verb requires an adverb.)
  2. HOW YOU YOU USE GOOD VS WELL?
    • Good is always an adjective.
    • It should not be used as an adverb with an action verb.
    • Never say, "You read really good, Mary" or "You hit the ball good, Liz."

    • Well is more versatile. It may be used as an adjective or an adverb. 
    • "He feels well again after his illness" or "All is well" or "The vocalist sang well."

    Note: It is the incorrect usage of the word good that will stand out as nonstandard usage and will reflect badly on you.
  3. Most adjectives and adverbs of one syllable form their comparative and superlative degrees by adding _______ AND ______.
    -er and -est. [Ex.- short,shorter, shortest and late, later, latest]

    • COMPARATIVE = COMPARE
    • SUPERLATIVE = SUPER
  4. DEFINE coordinating conjunctions
    • Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses.
    • F = for
    • A = and
    • N = nor
    • B = but
    • O = or
    • Y = yet
    • S = so
  5. WHEN TO USE A SEMICOLON?
    • REVIEW THIS THERE ARE 5 BUT HERE IS TWO. 
    • Used between independent clauses that are not joined by and, but, for, or, nor, yet, or so in a compound sentence. (This is done to avoid a run-on or comma splice sentence.)

    Used between items in a series if the items contain commas.(NY, NY; LA,CA; SF, CA)
  6. WHEN TO USE A COLON.
    Used before a list of items, especially after expressions like as follows and the following.

    Used before a long, formal statement or quotation.

    Used between the hour and the minute when you write the time.

    Used between chapter and verse in referring to passages from the Bible.

    Used between volume and number or between volume and page number of a periodical.

    Used after the salutation of a business letter.
  7. WHEN TO USE A COMMA?
          • Used to separate items in a series.






          • Used to separate two or more adjectives that modify the same noun.






          • Used before and, but, or, nor, for, yet, or so when they join independent clauses in a compound sentence.






          • Used to set off nonessential clauses and nonessential participial phrases.






          • Used after certain introductory elements such as well, yes, no, introductory phrases and clauses, etc.






          • Used to set off expressions that interrupt the sentence such as appositives, words of direct address, and parenthetical expressions.






          • Used to separate items in dates and addresses in a sentence.






          • Used after the salutation of a friendly letter and after the closing of any letter.
  8. WHEN TO CAPITALIZE?
    • Capitalize the first word in every sentence.
    • Capitalize the pronoun I and the interjection O.
    • Capitalize proper nouns and adjectives.
    • Capitalize the names of individual persons.
    • Capitalize geographical names like countries, states, counties, townships, cities, continents, islands, peninsulas, mountains, canyons, plains, forests, parks, dams, oceans, gulfs, lakes, streets, roads, etc.
    • Capitalize titles.
    • Capitalize the parts of a compound word as if each part stood alone (Italian-American, pre-Victorian)
  9. T OR F 
    Drop the final e before a suffix beginning with a vowel (caring, bridal, etc.)
    TRUE
  10. T OR F 
    Keep the final e before a suffix beginning with a consonant (lovely, placement, hopeful, etc.)
    TRUE
  11. T OR F 
    Double the final consonant before a suffix that begins with a vowel if both of the following conditions exist: (1) the word has only one syllable or is accented on the last syllable; (2) the word ends in a single consonant preceded by a single vowel (swimming, sunning, etc.)
    TRUE
  12. Stationary vs Stationery
    • Stationary = to be still
    • Stationery= as in paper
  13. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
    ALL TOGETHER AND ALTOGETHER
    All together means everyone or everything together.

    If the two terms can be separated, that’s a dead giveaway that the term you want is all together.

    • Altogether is an adverb and means "all in all," "all told," or "completely."
    • If you can replace the term with something like "completely" or "when all is said and done," you are altogether better off with altogether.

    If you can rewrite the sentence to use all and together separately, the term you want is all together.
  14. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 
    ALTOGETHER AND ALL TOGETHER
    • altogether - entirely
    • all together - everyone in one group or place
  15. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CAPITAL AND CAPITOL.
    capital - a city which is the seat of government of a country or state; also money used to carry on a business

    capitol - building in which a legislature meets.THINK ROTUNDA IS ROUND IN CAPITOL BLDG.
  16. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ITS AND IT'S
    its - possessive of it

    it's - contraction of it is
  17. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LOOSE AND LOSE.
    loose - free; unfastened; not tight

    lose - to suffer the loss of; not to win
  18. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHO'S AND WHOSE.
    who's - contraction of who is or who has 

    • whose - possessive form of who
    • (Whose book is this?)
  19. Jeanne and I have known each other literally since birth, she is one of my best friends.

    what is wrong with this sentence?
    It's a comma splice. 

    • To fix:
    • it either replace the colon with a semicolon or ",and" instead of the comma.
  20. THE 4 POINTS THAT ARE ON THE RUBRIC FOR THE WRITING PART OF THE TEST ARE.....


    BTW...5 PARAGRAPHS OR MORE!
    • FOCUS
    • SUPPORT (ELABORATION)
    • ORGANIZATION
    • GRAMMAR (& CONVENTIONS OF ENGLISH USAGE)

    • -A fully developed composition should be about five paragraphs or more. 
    • -Each  paragraphs will  have 5 sentences. ----State your position in an introductory paragraph. 
    • -Follow it with about three full paragraphs, each of which will discuss one point of support. 
    • -If you can determine these points before you start the essay, you will have a good start.
    • -End with a concluding paragraph.
  21. DEFINE ACCEPT AND EXCEPT
    EXCEPT = EXCLUDING 

    The word except is most commonly seen as a preposition.  However, it can also be used a conjunction and very occasionally as a verb.

    • ACCEPT
    • HOLD SOMETHING AS TRUE
    • RECEIVE SOMETHING WILLINGLY
    • TO ANSWER YES

What would you like to do?

Home > Flashcards > Print Preview