Medieval Art History 8th Century

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wegg
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259730
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Medieval Art History 8th Century
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2014-02-04 17:55:47
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8th Century
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Medieval Art History in the 8th Century
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  1. Oratory of John VII, Old St. Peter, Rome, 705-07 (destroyed)

    Square Halo represents someone who is still alive and is not a saint.
  2. Frescoes, S. Maria Antiqua:  

    Abandoned after an earthquake in the 9th Century.

    Built in the 5th Century.  

    Commissioned by client Thedotus, a high Church Official.

    created during Zaccarias’ (741-752) papacy

    dedicated to the martyrdom of saints

    most significant episodes of pre-Carolingian Roman art

    The client himself is pictured next to Mary.
  3. Frescoes, S. Maria Antiqua:  Abandoned after an earthquake in the 9th Century.

    Built in the 5th Century.  Crucifixion.

    Mary on left.

    Longinus was the soldier who pierced the side of the Crucified Savior.

    Stephaton was the soldier that gave Christ Vinegar.

    • The two solders are not seen in eastern art.
    •  
    • John the Evangelist on the right.

    Christ with eyes open with no signs of suffering.

    This has some modeling and layers of space.
  4. Frescoes, S. Maria Antiqua:  Abandoned after an earthquake in the 9th Century.

    Built in the 5th Century.

    Paul 1 - Apse, Adoration of the cross.

    Christ Crucifiction on the fork of the four rivers of Paradise.  

    • Mary,Paul.  
    • Angels.  
    • Lamb of God.

    Bezentine Christ on top.

    Beginning of the cross being the symbol of Christ's sacrifice.

    Alter would have been placed in front of this.
  5. Lombard Italy.

    Alter of Ratchis, c. 740

    This alter would have faced the congregation.

    Medieval Christian theology places seraphs in the highest choir of the angelic hierarchy. They are the caretakers of God's throne, continuously singing "holy, holy, holy".  

    Very abstract.  

    Big hands tiny bodies.

    Part of migration art where there was no training.

    Every Alter at this time had bits of the saints in them.  This one has a window where you can look in and see the relic.  They would dangle a cloth down to touch it.

    Very simple.  Maji all wearing pants to show they are foreign.  

    Style is very different from early Christian art.

    Strange frowning faces and goggle eyes.
  6. S Sofia, Benevento.  760

    Small churches were pretty normal for this time and location.

    This is a late Roman Building technique.

    Has three abse.

    Unique star pattern.

    Unusual Hexagon.

    Copy of hagia sophia in constantinople in that it has a dome and is built next to the palace.  Medieval copying was not exact.  It is enough to have a few elements to be considered a copy.
  7. Hiberno-Saxon and Viking.

    Franks Casket c. 700  Romulus And Remus.  Weyland and Smith and Adoration of the Maji.

    Not the tribe of the Franks but owned by the franks.  Made of whale bone.  Ivory would have been hard to come by.  

    Sack of Jerusalem where the building in the middle of the temple was destroyed in the year 71.

    Romulus and Ramus story of the origin of rome.

    Story of a princess that wanted to have a jewel repaired, drinds from her brothers skull and is poisoned.  very random because it is right next to the maji story.
  8. Lindisfarne Gospels.  c. 710-25

    Carpet page.

    The Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library Cotton MS Nero D.IV) is an illuminated manuscript gospel book produced around the year 700 in a monastery off the coast of Northumberland at Lindisfarne and which is now on display in the British Library in London. The manuscript is one of the finest works in the unique style of Hiberno-Saxon or Insular art, combining Mediterranean, Anglo-Saxon and Celtic elements.
  9. Lindisfarne Gospels.  c. 710-25

    Auther Portrate of Matthew.  Figure peeking out of curtain may have been christ making sure he is getting things right.  

    Very similar to the older Roman image of a scribe but no modeling.  more cartoonish.  copy but not.  no sense of illusion.

    The Lindisfarne Gospels (London, British Library Cotton MS Nero D.IV) is an illuminated manuscript gospel book produced around the year 700 in a monastery off the coast of Northumberland at Lindisfarne and which is now on display in the British Library in London. The manuscript is one of the finest works in the unique style of Hiberno-Saxon or Insular art, combining Mediterranean, Anglo-Saxon and Celtic elements.
  10. Book of Kells, c. 800

    Virgin and Child.  Ugliest Christ Child depiction in medieval art.

    Composition seems to crowd around the scene squeezing them in.  Hidden figures denote that there are hidden things in the text.
  11. Book of Kells, c. 800

    Culmination of this style.  Carpet pages, Author pages and all sots of other Illustrations.  Man or angels?  

    Chiro Page.  Very Decorative.

    swirls in the tradition of metal work.  Hidden faces with angel wings.  Hidden down the bottom are tom and Jerry.
  12. Gelasian Sacramentary, ca 750

    An example of Merovingian art.  Lots of animals. Architectural framework. Blue marble is an attempt to imitate the pattern of marble.  The fish and birds make up letters in the alphabet.  When a word is abbreviated, normally they use a line above the word to show this.  in this manuscript they used animals.  No interlace in this art.  Very flat and abstract.
  13. Gelasian Sacramentary, Te Igitur page c. 790

    Sacramentary is the text the priests would have used to give sermons.  The letter T is made into a cross.  Arms are straight out and eyes open but now for the first time we see the wound and blood.  Starting to see the effect of the Crucifixion but no signs of suffering.  This is the transition to showing lots of suffering that comes later.

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