LANGUAGE ART 6

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shockwave
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259781
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LANGUAGE ART 6
Updated:
2014-03-05 14:38:12
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LANGUAGE ART
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LANGUAGE ART 6
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LANGUAGE ART 6
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  1. T OR F 
    The word GRANDMOTHER, MUM, DAD, ECT is capitalized only when it is being used as a substitute for a person’s name, not when it is preceded by MY.
    TRUE
  2. WHAT'S CORRECT?

    Did you know that Professor Johnson’s wife is a professor of Biology at Hampton College?

    ------OR----

    Did you know that Professor Johnson’s wife is a professor of biology at Hampton College?
    PROFESSOR is capitalized when it is used as a title before a person’s name, as in PROFESSOR JOHNSON. The word is not capitalized, however, when it is not used as part of a name (as in PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY). General subject areas such as BIOLOGY are also not capitalized.
  3. T OR F
    A semicolon can join two complete thoughts into one sentence without a joining word.
    TRUE

    • BUT.....
    • IT CAN ALSO BE USED WHEN YOU HAVE TRANSITIONAL WORDS!

    I didn't forget to buy a lottery ticket; in fact, I bought ten of them.  

    The sentence is made up of two complete thoughts (I DIDN’T FORGET TO BUY A LOTTERY TICKET and I BOUGHT TEN OF THEM) joined with transitional words (IN FACT). A semicolon before the transitional words can join two thoughts into one sentence.
  4. CORRECT THIS SENTENCE:
    THE GROUP IS PLANNING THEIR PICNIC.
    SUBSTITUTE THEIR WITH ITS.

    • TAKE HOME: "ITS" SINGULAR POSSESSIVE. REMEMBER ITS MEANS POSSESSIVE.
    • IT'S MEANS "IT IS".
  5. DEFINE Demonstrative Pronouns
    • A demonstrative pronoun represents a thing or things:
    • near in distance or time (this, these)
    • far in distance or time (that, those)

    • singular: this (near) that (far)
    • plural: these (near) those (far)
    •  
    • Do not confuse demonstrative pronouns with demonstrative adjectives. They are identical, but a demonstrative pronoun stands alone, while a demonstrative adjective qualifies a noun.
    • That smells. (demonstrative pronoun)
    • That book is good. (demonstrative adjective + noun)

    • Normally we use demonstrative pronouns for things only. But we can use them for people when the person is identified.
    • This is Josef speaking. Is that Mary?That sounds like John.
  6. _________ modify or describe nouns.
    Adjectives modify or describe nouns.
  7. “He swam good.” why is this wrong?
    The proper sentence is "He swam well."

    Because "swam" is an action verb and it needs an adverb to describe it. 

    • "well" is an adverb it modifies verbs.
    •  
    • "good" is an adjective it modifies nouns.
  8. WHAT ARE COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS?
    and, but, or, nor, for, so

    USED Between independent clauses TO JOIN TOGETHER.

    USE A COMMA BEFORE IT!!

    Example: We wanted to see the show, but we didn't get there on time.
  9. T OR F
    A COMMA IS USED BETWEEN ADDRESSES AND DATES AND THE REST OF THE SENTENCE.
    TRUE. 

    • Example: 
    • He vacationed at the White Pine Hotel, 98 Ashland Street, Radford, Virginia, in May, 1987.
  10. HOW IS THE COMMA USED IN REFERENCE TO ADDRESSING SOMEONE.
    WHEN THE PERSON IS SPOKEN DIRECTLY TO, YOU SEPARATE THE NAME. BOTH BEFORE AND AFTER. (THINK PRESENT TENSE).

    Be sure, however, that the name is that of someone actually being spoken to.

    I'm telling you, Juanita, I couldn't be more surprised.

    I told Juanita I couldn't be more surprised. 

    • Their years of training now forgotten, the soldiers broke ranks.
    • Yes, it is always a matter, of course, of preparation and attitude.
  11. HOW TO USE COMMAS IN A DIRECT QUOTE IN A SENTENCE?
    Example: “Call the police,” she screamed, “and tell them to come quickly!”

    NOTICE THE COMMA INSIDE THE 1ST QUOTE AT THE END. THE SECOND QUOTE IS SEPARATED BY A COMMA ON THE OUTSIDE (BEFORE) IT.
  12. T OR F 
    USE A SEMICOLON Between parts of sentences which already contain commas.
    TRUE 

    Example: The starting lineup includes Mary Gardner, forward; Jean Phillips, center; and Helen Weaver, guard.
  13. T OR F
    USE A SEMICOLON Between independent clauses if either clause contains other commas.
    TRUE 

    She is a beautiful, talented, young woman; but she will have trouble getting to Hollywood, New York, or Boston because of her attitude.
  14. T OR F
    USE A SEMICOLON Between independent clauses joined by a conjunctive adverb such as however, therefore, moreover, furthermore, consequently, or on the other hand
    TRUE

    The test began on time; however, we were late getting out of class.
  15. T OR F 

    USE A COMMA Between contrasting parts of a sentence.
    TRUE 

    It was John, not Harry, who paid for our dinner.

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